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Hello, just wanted to find out if anyone has made their own back quiver and any links to go to?Thanks Gordon
 

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I've made two backpack quivers using vented plastic tubing. It's basic tile line tubing that I got at home depot. Very lite, and easy to work with. I then made a camo cover, and pockets... check it out!! I also made a two bow soft case. One main pocket for a strung bow, and one unstrung...
 

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To make the quiver, measure around the tube, cut fabric to fit the tube plus 1 inch for your seams. Then you sew on your pockets, turn the fabric inside out, and sew the sides and the bottom. Then, turn right side out again, slide in tube, make sure you put a cap on one end, fabric cover with velcro on top. Walla!!

Total cost per quiver, about $20 bucks. oh yea. almost forgot, drill two holes and attach back strap using a bolt and locking nuts.

Whatever plastic tube you get, make sure it has holes to let air in and out. Otherwise if you shoot feathers, on a warm moist day your feathers could be toast.

If you don't know how to sew, learn, it will save you lots of money. I learned because what I wanted was either too expensive, or poor quality. Mine are 4 1/2 wide by 35 tall for target arrows, 37 for hunting. I leave my arrows in them at all times, when I hunt, I use a bow quiver. I never take my back quiver out to the field because if you need to get an arrow fast, your out of luck!

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Quivers

Thats a sharp set up Dave,thanks for info and your right learn to sew.That part I got.Still want to try leather for tradition.
 

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Simple leather/skin quiver:

Cut a piece of animal skin (dried, scraped, and stretched- hair on, no chemicals, tanning, or salt) or pliable leather about 14" across the top, 12" across the bottom, about 24" deep. Fold a cuff down, about 1.5" for the neck, from the inside out, and fold the whole thing in half (tear-drop shape) and whip stitch it closed. You can sew it up into an oval if you'd like, just takes a little longer. No other reason. Then cut a botton out, oval or tear drop, and whip stitch it on the bottom. Place another piece of hide inside, hair up, to cushion broadheads. Sew on an old leather belt, cut slightly off center so it's comfortabley adjustable, and you're done. Takes about an hour or two.

It's as simple or complicated as you make it.
 

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I made a few several years ago. I made a pattern from heavy paper, to be sure the deminsions were right before I started cutting leather. When I was satisfied with the pattern, I marked my holes, punched them, then laced it together with leather. I also reinforced the bottom for broadheads.

This was before I figured out I absolutely HATE back quivers. They look the coolest, but are the worst for function--I tried them for hunting and 3-D, and they just don't work for me.

After years of trying different quivers, I think my search ended earlier this year with the Safari Tough "Arrow Master". I haven't had a chance to hunt with it yet, but I've worn it to several 3-D tournaments--so far, I love it. It's not cheap, but compared to what I've spent over the years on quivers I've bought and made, it was a real bargain.

Chad
 
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