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Ok lets here the best way to stop the wobbling I get at full draw that's making my shots in consistent.
 

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Reduce your draw weight to a point that is comfortable and excersize, draw and hold your bow everyday and work yourself up to a poundage that works best for you. Don't think you have to shoot at the top end just to "Man up". Make sure your draw length isn't to long also, it is impossible to relax if your forced into a poor shooting form.

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you may also be in need of a good stabilizer. Think about it. The heavier your bow is, the harder it is to move. So once you get zeroed in on the bullseye, it will be easier to hold it there.
 

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CoonHound and Spaz are right on the money, once you have the draw and poundage correct work on holding your form together at full draw with your back muscles.
If your bow arm is slightly bent and your release arm from wrist to elbow makes a strait line off the arrow you should be set.
Just keep working at it and enjoy the process.
 

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Try to stay relaxed...both physically and mentally. Any tension will introduce tension and torque into your bow. Get a good rigid, weight forward stabilizer to control rotational inertia since many forces are built up in the bow string, cables, limbs, the arms, hand and back of the archer, etc. when at full draw.
 

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Holding steady begins by getting your draw length perfect, not a half inch long, but perfect. From there you will need some help with form, since good form is the only answer to a steady shot. Form is very hard to explain on a computer, but, as stated above, you should have every muscle in both arms as relaxed as possible. You will need to learn to get all the weight balanced on the back muscles, no arm muscles should come into play once the bow is back at full draw and you settle into aiming. If you shoot too much weight, this will be almost impossible. You should actually be kind of "proping the bow up" between the push and pull of the back muscles. A back tension release can help you learn this faster for some people. Maybe someone with better words can be of more help to explain it. The thing is, if you know what you are striving for during practice, your practice sessions will eventually produce improvements. The stabilizers won't work wonders, but will definetly help. I like to weight the end of the stabilizer so that when at full draw, the back tension is just enough to keep the aiming point from creeping downward. This is personal preference. You will have to experiment with weights until you get it just right for you. Find someone who is a great shot and bug them until they help you out with form:)
 

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I always hunted with about 68 lbs. draw weight. Last fall I didn't touch my bow for about 1 1/2 months during firearms season. When I picked up the bow again, I could draw 68 lbs. easily, but had the shakes bad. I was rock solid before the lay off. I reduced my weight to 63lbs. and still had the shakes after shooting 4 or 5 times a week for the last couple of months. I switched to a heavier stabilizer and that did the trick for me. I'm still scratching my head about how I developed the shakes. The only thing I can figure is, I'll be 54 this year!
 

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maybe lower the poudage and dont drink pop or tea stuff that has caffine in it is not good get a longer stablizer if u dont already they help a lot
 

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Are you gripping your bow too tight? It causes tension. I have that happen when I %&*% up and grip the bow. No problem when I barely touch my thumb and index finger together.
 

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Holding steady begins by getting your draw length perfect, not a half inch long, but perfect. From there you will need some help with form, since good form is the only answer to a steady shot. Form is very hard to explain on a computer, but, as stated above, you should have every muscle in both arms as relaxed as possible. You will need to learn to get all the weight balanced on the back muscles, no arm muscles should come into play once the bow is back at full draw and you settle into aiming. If you shoot too much weight, this will be almost impossible. You should actually be kind of "proping the bow up" between the push and pull of the back muscles. A back tension release can help you learn this faster for some people. Maybe someone with better words can be of more help to explain it. The thing is, if you know what you are striving for during practice, your practice sessions will eventually produce improvements. The stabilizers won't work wonders, but will definetly help. I like to weight the end of the stabilizer so that when at full draw, the back tension is just enough to keep the aiming point from creeping downward. This is personal preference. You will have to experiment with weights until you get it just right for you. Find someone who is a great shot and bug them until they help you out with form:)

Exactly right! Draw length, form & relaxation at full draw.

You also have to accept some movement. Only a chosen few seem to be able to hold dead steady. Us mortals have to accept a range of motion that good form and relaxation (both physical & mental) can help to reduce.
 

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Ok lets here the best way to stop the wobbling I get at full draw that's making my shots in consistent.
I would first make sure that your draw length isn't set too long and then turn your bow poundage down a bit.
 

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Even most of the top pros dont hold perfectly steady. But then again success in archery never did have anything to do with holding steady.
 

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have a high protien , no carb meal before the shoot. carbs make you more edgey
 

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dont drink pop or tea stuff that has caffine in it
Yep, I always shake more in the morning after my coffee, but after I eat lunch or dinner, it's usually rock solid. That's the time when I start busting nocks and arrows, so I usually don't shoot groups anymore after I eat.:wink:
 
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