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Looking to get my first dog. I have had dogs in the past but only when I was real young. Looking to get my first puppy but I can't say I know anything about how to train it right. Probably will be mostly a regular dog but might do a little hunting with it. Any suggestions?
 

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what kind of hunting????
 

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Bird, Duck, not sure. I don't have the dog yet so I don't know what breed it will be. I just want to know how to train it to be a good dog. Ill worry about training it to hunt later I guess.
 

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there is a author named Richard wolters he has several books that are really good for helping guys train dogs , he has different books like the water dog , the gun dog ,bird dog he has several more
 

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Well instead of reading books, since your new to the whole dog thing, take your dog to obedience classes, they will train you and your dog if it's a good class. I know so many people that get dogs that have never owned one before and don't know how to properly train them, that when the dog gets older they become so bad the owner doesn't want the dog any longer, even though it's not the dogs fault. And since your going to be starting out with a puppy, I warn you, it will be very tough. Potty training is the worst time, make sure you have access to a shampooer because they will go on the floor, just takes time. Do some YouTube searches, there are plenty of great videos on there for training your dog to do so many different things. Also just remember this, if you want your dog to be your long life friend, so treat your dog good and he will be by your side for life
 

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OOOOOHHHH, general training like going potty outside, sitting, lay down, shake, kennel! Dunno any books for that.
 

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If your going to use the dog to hunt you need to start training him as soon as he/she is able to learn his basic commands like sit, stay, and come. Wolters books are not bad but very old. In the beginning pick up something that explains how to crate train your puppy, that will be the first step to him becoming a great dog. Key word in any kind of dog training is "Consistency" Good luck.
 

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Nothing better then a Labrador Retriever. Great hunting and family dogs. Richard Wolters was a great trainer in his day, but a lot of better training material has come out since he wrote his books. I would consider the following books and videos. I like to use both as you will get more information from reading, but its helps also by watching it being done. I would go check out the web site www.rushcreekpress.com , and the video series Fowl Dawgs 1-4. Good luck
 

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I've trained 2 hunting dogs. The first was a Brittany puppy that was bought for pheasant hunting and that is all he did. Outside kennel. Never in the house. The second was a 2 year old shorthair I saved from an idiot. She was a house dog/hunter. Both were good hunting dogs and I read some books but it was a simple process. Nearly every method is the same for training dogs. Both dogs were very good hunters, but I don't give myself the credit for that. They were bred for hunting. I don't hunt birds any more and my current rescued retriever is just a companion. I hoped to blood train her for tracking deer but she doesn't have the nose for it. My 14 year old shorthair tracked one for me when she was lame, half-blind and deaf without ever having done it before....

There are probably 1000 web sites on gun dog training and I'll bet they all use the same method, pretty much.

Obedience. The dog must have no free will. It must think everything it does it does for you. If the dog is bred for hunting, there is no teaching it to hunt. It knows that. It only needs to be taught to hunt for you. Never let the dog run loose and hunt for itself. Teach it to Sit, Stay, and Come. Add "whoa" and "leave it" once those three are learned. Teach it "kennel" which means to get into whatever you are pointing to....the box, the truck, the car, the house, etc. Teach it to come to a whistle. Teach it to "whoa" to a hand sign. That's it for upland hunting. I guess "find the bird" is a good idea too. I like pointers. I never hunted ducks. Seems like a good way to drown...both you and the dog.

Gun shy. The dog needs to be introduced properly to gun noises,which can be firecrackers. Or a .22. At a distance. At meal time. Slowly. No 12 gauges at 10 feet to start off with.

Hunt close. I trained my Brittany on a set of abandoned RR tracks. He learned to hunt back and forth between the fence lines...perfect distance left to right, all I had to do was keep him close. Which I did with "come" and then releasing him. The shorthair needed a shock collar to learn "stay close" but she was a bit wild at first.

I don't like shock collars, but if you don't train every day, it might be a necessary evil.

"Hunt" as often as you can. Each outing should be hunting even if its not hunting season. Don't let the dog wander off. Train like you hunt. If you can use pigeons, game farm birds, etc. in the off-season you'll be miles ahead.

Remember its a long haul deal...a dog isn't going to get it all in the first couple of years. They get excited and forget whose the boss.

Don't beat the dog. I read somewhere that after the third swat you aren't disciplining the dog but taking out your frustrations on it. Neither of my dogs needed much discipline but the 3 swat rule keeps you in check if you lose your temper. Instead of beating the dog just quit training for the day. For me, training was as fun as hunting.
 

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I've trained 2 hunting dogs. The first was a Brittany puppy that was bought for pheasant hunting and that is all he did. Outside kennel. Never in the house. The second was a 2 year old shorthair I saved from an idiot. She was a house dog/hunter. Both were good hunting dogs and I read some books but it was a simple process. Nearly every method is the same for training dogs. Both dogs were very good hunters, but I don't give myself the credit for that. They were bred for hunting. I don't hunt birds any more and my current rescued retriever is just a companion. I hoped to blood train her for tracking deer but she doesn't have the nose for it. My 14 year old shorthair tracked one for me when she was lame, half-blind and deaf without ever having done it before....

There are probably 1000 web sites on gun dog training and I'll bet they all use the same method, pretty much.

Obedience. The dog must have no free will. It must think everything it does it does for you. If the dog is bred for hunting, there is no teaching it to hunt. It knows that. It only needs to be taught to hunt for you. Never let the dog run loose and hunt for itself. Teach it to Sit, Stay, and Come. Add "whoa" and "leave it" once those three are learned. Teach it "kennel" which means to get into whatever you are pointing to....the box, the truck, the car, the house, etc. Teach it to come to a whistle. Teach it to "whoa" to a hand sign. That's it for upland hunting. I guess "find the bird" is a good idea too. I like pointers. I never hunted ducks. Seems like a good way to drown...both you and the dog.

Gun shy. The dog needs to be introduced properly to gun noises,which can be firecrackers. Or a .22. At a distance. At meal time. Slowly. No 12 gauges at 10 feet to start off with.

Hunt close. I trained my Brittany on a set of abandoned RR tracks. He learned to hunt back and forth between the fence lines...perfect distance left to right, all I had to do was keep him close. Which I did with "come" and then releasing him. The shorthair needed a shock collar to learn "stay close" but she was a bit wild at first.

I don't like shock collars, but if you don't train every day, it might be a necessary evil.

"Hunt" as often as you can. Each outing should be hunting even if its not hunting season. Don't let the dog wander off. Train like you hunt. If you can use pigeons, game farm birds, etc. in the off-season you'll be miles ahead.

Remember its a long haul deal...a dog isn't going to get it all in the first couple of years. They get excited and forget whose the boss.

Don't beat the dog. I read somewhere that after the third swat you aren't disciplining the dog but taking out your frustrations on it. Neither of my dogs needed much discipline but the 3 swat rule keeps you in check if you lose your temper. Instead of beating the dog just quit training for the day. For me, training was as fun as hunting.
Very close to my philosophy except I'm a great fan of electronic collars, if used correctly. Know what you want in a dog...don't try training a flushing dog to point.
 

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Best method I've used for getting a dog used to gunfire; parked 2-3 blocks away from a trap range, had the dog on a leash a just started walking toward the range. Approach from the proper side of the range of course! I bounced a ball along the way & talked to the pup the entire time. The dog never even noticed the shots. I'll second Wolter's books as well.
 

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I would purchase a training clicker if I were you. There are plenty of you tube videos out there showing how to properly train your dog using one. Its much easier for them to understand a certain command through clicks as opposed to using a voice command which can sound vastly different from person to person.
 

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I would purchase a training clicker if I were you. There are plenty of you tube videos out there showing how to properly train your dog using one. Its much easier for them to understand a certain command through clicks as opposed to using a voice command which can sound vastly different from person to person.
As a matter of etiquette, I tried my best to keep my mouth shut when I was hunting over another dog with the owner present...no matter how bad the dog was. Mine would respond to hand, voice or whistle commands. Just depends on how much effort you want to put into your dog.
 

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I have raised, trained and finished as Field Champions 5 German Shorthairs. If you get a pointing dog do NOT use Wolters books. Maybe Smiths "Best way to train your gun dog" If you are new to dogs please read "The art of raising a puppy" by the Monks of New Skete. I now have a Gsp and an English Pointer at home. If you are new to dogs, please stay away from electric collars. Remember that whenever you interact with a dog you are teaching them something, and what you want them to do more than anything is to learn to love and respect you, do not lose your temper with them, ever.
 

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Im in my first year with a lab mix and have enjoyed clicker training. My dog will be family dog frst and an antler dog in my dreams. Basic commands become challenging in different environments/situations and so include these. But train with success in mind not "testing" the dog. Does that make sense?
 

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Basic obedience is the foundation of any traing program. Crate train you dog if you plan to have it inside the house - it will save you and the puppy huge problems. Be sure to socialize your pup. To avoid gun shyness I introduce loud noises at feeding times like banging skillets together then slowly introduce them from a distance to gun fire. E-collars are good tools but you need to learn how to use them or you can do more harm than good. There are tons of books out there. I'm a Boykin spaniel guy and they really seem to respond to positive reinforcement best. I'll plug Lion Country Supply (www.lcsupply.com) for their selection and price of supplies - they also have training books and videos.
 

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I've had dogs my whole life, including many hunting breeds, and some just companions. Its my opinion that you can't train a dog to hunt, they either have it or they don't. However, they can all be great pets. More than anything, spend as much time with them as possible when they are pups. I treat mine like kids, they go everywhere with me, sleep in the same bed, watch tv on the couch, etc. It is no coincidence that the best dogs I've had are the ones I've had the strongest bond with.
 
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