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In 'Da Head
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That time of year is definitely upon us and we are all wanting to head out into the field with the best possible set-up. Part of this involves tuning your bow for broadheads. Broadhead tuning first requires a bow that is set to factory specs (Axle to axle, brace height, cam timing, idler string feed etc.) and properly tuned for field points in order to achieve accurate and consistent arrow flight. This can be best achieved by first paper tuning and then walk-back tuning. Fletching/vane contact issues with the bow, cables and/or rest are also overlooked by many shooters in the tuning process but can cause serious problems with arrow and broadhead flight. Fletching contact (even with feathers) can act like an incorrect center shot or nock point adjustment and cause serious frustration during the tuning process. In some cases, the frustration may be so great that the shooter wants to “gravel tune” the bow :wink: A weak arrow shaft spine can also show center shot problems for and nocking point problems for release shooters.

Now once your bow is paper and walk-back tuned and set to specs, it is time to open up that pack of broadheads. Broadheads MUST be perfectly aligned to the arrow shaft. Broadheads should be assembled according to the manufacturer’s recommendation, tightened with a broadhead wrench and SPUN like a top, on a hard flat surface or arrow spinner (available commercially) to check for straightness. The desired outcome here is no wobble present during the spinning process. If you get a wobble, try a different shaft until you see a perfect spin and no wobble.

If you broadhead does wobble and it is assembled correctly, the inserts or outserts may need to be rotated in order for the broadhead to spin properly. 2-part epoxy is good for this purpose as its slow cure time allows the archer to check the arrows as the epoxy begins to harden. Broadheads should be turned on the arrow as the epoxy thickens until the arrow spins true. Then stand the arrow up straight for the glue to cure.

Hot melt adhesive is also useful(especially for aluminum arrows). But working time is very short and occasionally must be reheated to achieve a true spin. All of these problems must be addressed prior to an archer tuning broadheads. If all of these problems are corrected broadhead tuning can be a snap

Broadhead groups that consistently deviate high and low can be fixed with either a rest elevation or minor nock adjustments. Conversely, groups that show a horizontal deviation can benefit from minor center shot adjustments. In both situations adjustments should be made minutely in 1/16" increments or less, in either direction until groups close and become more consistent.

Broadheads react to the direction in which they are launched much more that target tipped arrows. If broadheads group to the left of field points then the arrow rest should be moved to the right. If broadheads group above field points, the nocking point should be raised or rest should be lowered. This adjustment can be reversed for opposite conditions, but remember to make adjustments in very small amounts and to pay attention to broadhead groups begin to suffer.

These adjustments will obviously change the point of impact of your field tips as well. You can make sight adjustments at any time during this process, but the overall goal is to get the field points and broadheads to group together. Once this is achieved a final sight adjustment can be made.

We owe the time this takes to the animals we hunt and ourselves. The overall goal is to go into the woods with the best possible set-up to quickly and efficiently kill the pursued game. Feel free to add/comment/critique :)

"Derived from article by Mark Land at www.muzzy.com"
 

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In 'Da Head
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Discussion Starter #4
rockwaters18 said:
If the broadheads group above the field points, shouldn't you move the nock point up? just asking
Fixed it, I must have omitted that line initially. I initially was just going to write only rest adjustments, but added the nock point adjustments too, but forgot to include the direction for the nock point...thanks:darkbeer:
 

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How much does arrow wt/spine play into this?

I shot a Muzzy 3 blade 100gr on a 340 Easton ST. Every shot was high and left.

Put the same broadhead on a 400gr ICS hunter and it flies like a field point.

Is it me or can this make that much of a difference?
 

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not trying to hijack thst thread but I have been broadhead tuning recently. Broadheads were grouping 6 inches low. i moved my nock point down in small increments. Broadheads and field points converged to about 3 inches. That was as close as I could get them to group, no matter what I tried.
 

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In 'Da Head
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Discussion Starter #7
redruff said:
How much does arrow wt/spine play into this?

I shot a Muzzy 3 blade 100gr on a 340 Easton ST. Every shot was high and left.

Put the same broadhead on a 400gr ICS hunter and it flies like a field point.

Is it me or can this make that much of a difference?
Arrow spine and point weight are a huge factor in how a bow will tune.
 

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JUst buy the G5 sqauring tool

It works. Flattens those aluminum inserts square evertime.:wink:
 

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Another Thing I'm doing this year is shooting at 2 diff.tagets at same time.One withF>T>and the otherw/BHS.Speeds up the comparison progress. Makes tweeking go a bit Faster.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Daniel Boone said:
It works. Flattens those aluminum inserts square evertime.:wink:
DB good point that is a very good tool. The G5 ASD will ensure a square cut to either aluminum or carbon arrows and definitely give you more success when you spin those broadheads.
 

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Doc said:
Arrow spine and point weight are a huge factor in how a bow will tune.
I just find it interesting that I shot those Eastons all summer with field points, dead on, stuck the BH on and they sailed.
 

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We owe the time this takes to the animals we hunt and ourselves. The overall goal is to go into the woods with the best possible set-up to quickly and efficiently kill the pursued game.
Glad you put that in there :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
redruff said:
I just find it interesting that I shot those Eastons all summer with field points, dead on, stuck the BH on and they sailed.
BH's will show minor set-up/tuning flaws a lot better than field points.
 

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How much does arrow wt/spine play into this?

I shot a Muzzy 3 blade 100gr on a 340 Easton ST. Every shot was high and left.

Put the same broadhead on a 400gr ICS hunter and it flies like a field point.

Is it me or can this make that much of a difference?
This factor is often over looked.if you are having to make major adjustments to your centershot your spine is off and needs adjusting.Or you have issues with cam lean,etc.


CB
 

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doc thanks for posting up, where are you located in Oh, and will you host any BH tuning sessions for help and teaching those less knowledgable?
 

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Doc great thread...There is one thing I will add mostly for the folks new to archery. Thats is check your fletching clearance. Had a guy call that was having trouble with his BH. He came over to shoot. After a few arrows I noticed a slight angle at the target. Got out the wifes lipstick. Sure enough he had contact with the cable. I also noticed black on the same fletching of all of his arrows. He was shooting a prong style rest and had the cock fletch set in the wrong place. Didn't take long to tune those BH in once we corrected the contact problem....
 

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In 'Da Head
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Discussion Starter #17
teambringit1 said:
doc thanks for posting up, where are you located in Oh, and will you host any BH tuning sessions for help and teaching those less knowledgable?
Cleveland area and no "sessions" plsnned, but always willing to help fellow archers:darkbeer:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
gonehunting 45 said:
Doc great thread...There is one thing I will add mostly for the folks new to archery. Thats is check your fletching clearance. Had a guy call that was having trouble with his BH. He came over to shoot. After a few arrows I noticed a slight angle at the target. Got out the wifes lipstick. Sure enough he had contact with the cable. I also noticed black on the same fletching of all of his arrows. He was shooting a prong style rest and had the cock fletch set in the wrong place. Didn't take long to tune those BH in once we corrected the contact problem....
Excellent point:darkbeer:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Bump for smitty09
 

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You'd be surprised at how many don't know this.

Great post Doc! I wish this site was around when I first started bowhunting. With nobody to show me the ropes, I had no clue you had to tune with broadheads. I thought you just put them on and were good to go. I learned the hard way. :thumbs_do

Chart below....

JP
 

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