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OK, this is really dumb. But hey, I thought I'd ask.

Given that you don't get a perpendicular string on a single cam (at least, none that I've seen), and it only attaches at one point at the lower end (on the cam) wouldn't this induce a fair amount of twisting motion in the lower limb? (Not in the top limb, because it's anchored around the idler and then at the edges of the limbs rather than slightly off-centre)

And because of the Hoyt split limbs, which basically are two limbs that are largely independent of each other, wouldn't they be more prone to twisting?

Yeah, I know this is dumb because of the scores shot with these things. But had to ask...:rolleyes:
 

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if you look at the way the string and the cables are confegered thay all work to keep it pulling start so if it is tuned proper things stay straight so that ther is no lean


runawaysXs;)
 

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Shirt,

My understanding is that you are right, on both counts -- split limbs are way weaker than solid limbs and thus much more prone to twisting (when such a problem exists).

But the observed performance, i.e., the scores, does not justify a whole lot of worry. The major job that a bow has to do is launch an arrow consistently, not necessarily with everything perfectly straight. Hoyts do the former job exceptionally well.

To really give your question a full treatment involves a fairly complicated analysis and some difficult measurements, which I have never done.

It is a strange fact that machines will often perform better if things are "pushed" just a little bit to one side of perfect equillibrium. Lots of cars run better before a tune-up; rifle bullets fly better if they hit a tight spot just before the muzzle, etc. Asymmetries are not always bad.

Scott
 

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Just a question, How can split limbs be "weaker" than solids? The answer lies more in the fact that because there is a split in the center, that the torsion of the cam, induced by the cable guard and the fact that the cable (which has all the stress on at at full draw) is attached to one side of the cam rather than the center, acts more upon one limb than the other. The same force acts upon solid limb bows, but is not as noticeable.

In the end, a machine is a machine. Any machine that is working properly, will do it's job exactly the same all the time if you do yours.......;)
 
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