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Discussion Starter #1
Struggling with nock high paper tear, bareshaft low at 20yds.
Hoyt CD 34, 65# limbs, 62# pulling.
ATA 33 31/32.
BH 7 1/16.
(have shot/used various arrows 300-350 spine 425 - 460 grain during tuning)

Had set in D SLOT for my D 30.25.... Cam feels kinda wonky in this slot and jumpy, but otherwise I couldn't get nose to string at full draw.
Kept lowering nock pt and rest but started getting fletching contact.

Switched to C SLOT (DL about 29. 75). Had to abandon touching nose to string as anchor pt getting really high and I wondered if my back elbow was not level/parallel with arrow. I think will just use my peep and put it a kisser button
But this seemed to FIX my nock high tear. (its super cold out so haven't been able to go shoot bareshaft or broadheads) but my paper tune looks WAY BETTER.
How come I couldn't tune with my DL that felt better? It's weird not having nose on string but I think I can get used to it. I otherwise love bow and how it shoots
I have read others posts from 2016 and 2017 on vertical nock travel on these cams.
What did I fix or did I just bandaid a bigger issue?
Thoughts?
 

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Hunter of many things
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Nock high or low usually is a pretty easy fix i have found. Set your rest first at berger hole then start with nock point level. Your timing also has to be set even. You should close at that point.
If you have a tear then adjust nock point only (not nock point and rest) or maybe timing a tad.


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Discussion Starter #3
I am having problems with lowering nock pt or raising rest and getting fletching contact issues. I de-timed the cams to have bottom hit first and still not fixed.
It's set dead level through Berger hole (shaft centered in Berger hole).left/ right seems ok...
 

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"vertical nock travel" is another buzzword that keeps archers fiddling rather than shooting and keeps their scores down and anxiety up. Put the idea out of your mind - a bow with "vertical knock travel" can be tuned to spit out a straight and level bareshaft just as well as one without. For many decades, compound bows were tuned to shoot good bareshafts before anyone even knew what "vertical knock travel" was, or whether their bow even had it or not.

In any case, the case where the arrow isn't too weak and the bareshaft isn't responding to knocking point location, trial-and-error detiming of the cams is necessary to tune out a knock high or low.

The procedure is fairly simple:
- on the draw board, adjust the cables until the cams are hitting the stops at the same time.
- go shoot a bareshaft
- if the shaft goes nock-high or low:
- detime the cams by adding/subtracting a twist or maybe two in the cables according to the bow design (say in the buss cable).
- shoot a bareshaft again.
- if that helped:
- continue twisting in that direction.
- if it made it worse:
- take out the original twists and go in the other direction.

repeat until the bareshaft is level.

That's all you need to do. Once you have an acceptable bareshaft for you, head to the field, go shoot and enjoy.

It should be noted that if the bareshaft doesn't respond to any adjustment, or plateaus a little high or low even with additional adjustment, that points to a form or execution problem and not a problem with the bow. It could also be being underspined which for me for example often shows up as an incurable knock-high. In that case, time to look at the shooter, or adjust the arrow spine..

That's the basic idea....

lee.
 

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sometimes reality hurts
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Hoyts are designed for a slightly high nock travel. it helps ensure rest clearance, which is a variable that will affect accuracy if there is contact.

people obsess far too much about getting a perfect bullet hole. it is not necessary, and possibly undesirable if it comes with clearance issues. you care about whether the bow puts the arrow in the same place each time.
 

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Hoyts are designed for a slightly high nock travel. it helps ensure rest clearance, which is a variable that will affect accuracy if there is contact.

people obsess far too much about getting a perfect bullet hole. it is not necessary, and possibly undesirable if it comes with clearance issues. you care about whether the bow puts the arrow in the same place each time.

An out of tune bow will hit the same hole over and over....so ‘obsessing’ or tuning as most call it is important especially if shooting broadheads.
 

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An out of tune bow will hit the same hole over and over....so ‘obsessing’ or tuning as most call it is important especially if shooting broadheads.
Spot on Terry.

I am a huge fan of Hoyt bows, but can admit they are are royal pain to tune for super clean/true arrow flight. I love to tinker, so that's why I still buy a Hoyt.

I don't subscribe to the notion a bow should shoot a high tear to shoot the best. Common sence would say less outside forces on a shaft, would make it more forgiving.

When shooting with a high tear, the broadheads dive. It's easy to see the shaft whip down range. Side gusts of wind will have a greater negative effect on the shot. Tremendous amounts of efficiency are lost, with the shaft plowing/augering until it stabilizes.

There is no good reason for this old mentality.
 

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I have a wild card fix that may work on your Hoyt. I have used it on some of mine and others.

Set your top draw mod 1 setting longer. Leave your cable stops in the correct hole. This will throw your cam sync way out of whack.

Next, work your control cable to get the stops hitting the same. Go ahead and begin bare shaft tuning again with nock point set level or a hair high.

One thing to note: This fix will decrease your valley and increase holding weight. Your bow will gain speed.
 

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I’m quite sure those that think it’s not the bow have not shot the DFX cams at different draw lengths and cam sizes.
There was definitely a problem and it may not be your form.

You can pull up my thread on the original Defiant that came out and I cover things you can do to correct it.

Changing one of the mod positions, grip and cam synch.

Any time you have to have a hybrid with bottom cam hitting first is not really the best situation.


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I have a wild card fix that may work on your Hoyt. I have used it on some of mine and others.

Set your top draw mod 1 setting longer. Leave your cable stops in the correct hole. This will throw your cam sync way out of whack.

Next, work your control cable to get the stops hitting the same. Go ahead and begin bare shaft tuning again with nock point set level or a hair high.

One thing to note: This fix will decrease your valley and increase holding weight. Your bow will gain speed.
This will get you dialed in on those problem bows


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Thanks Norm!

Shame and Norm ( ontaget7 and whack and stack) are basically resident experts on these bows, so I’d listen and follow any and all suggestions they offer.
 
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