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Discussion Starter #1
I been bowhunting for 5 years now I started when I was 14 so that will tell you how old I am.I bowhunted all last year and killed three deer and 5 hogs so I know I can hit where I'm aiming.Before season started this year I bought a new bow,and I love the way it shoots,but the whole season I have struggled with what I guess is target panic?Last year I didn't have this problem.When I'm at the house practicing (sp) I can't manage to hit the dots one my bag.I always hit right below the dot and no matter how hard I try I can't move that last 1" up to put my pin on the dot.If I move it up to the dot I shoot real quick.I don't know If it's me not being used to the new bow or what,cause last year I never had this problem this bad.I've already missed 2 deer and a hog this year,and it's starting to get the best on me.What should I do to work this problem out?I did hear about the back tension release,but I don't 50 or 60 dollars to buy a back tension release at the time.Don't get me wrong I would use one,but do not have the money at the time!

thanks
 

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try blank bailing take your sight, stand 4-5 feet from the target and jsut practice squeezign the trigger. then once you fel that you have that down slowly start aimign again, start at say 5 yrds and shoot there to you jsut cant miss and move on. p.s. yo dont need a back tension release to shoot back tension it is more of style. if you do a search you can find some info on it here
 

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Another thing if I keep my finger BEHIND the trigger and try to put my pin on the dot I am calm and relaxed,and it is no problem to put my pin on the dot!But if I start to put my finger in front on the trigger I start to move my pin and I anticipate the shot,and then make a crazy shot!
 

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I had this problem in the past. There are several ways to deal with it. At first I just let my pin stay just below the spot I wanted to hit and sighted it in that way. It worked for a while, but I was a hunter then and shot my bow casually. Then I got a little more serious about archery and joined a spot league shooting a 60 arrow 300 round. Aiming off was not an option. Practice was key at this point for me. I would just practice holding on the x and then let down the bow, draw aim hold and let down over and over until I could hold on the x with out getting shaky. Maybe it will help you too. I shot several leagues and that improved my abilities greatly, I still struggle from time to time. I am now learning back tension and OH MY it is very different. It will get you out of the snap shooting that I still do sometimes while on the 3D course. Target archery will make you a better shot as a hunter (as far as form and exicution, not buck fever).
Blank bailing can help too if you do it right.
 

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try some aiming exercises, along with the blank bailing, split the time up, shoot blank bail for a while. then do an aimign exercise.draw anchor and aim BUT dotn release aim for say5-10 seconds then let down take a breather and do it again, keep that up and you will jsut slwoly have to start to incorporate things slowly but onyl work on one thing at a time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I hear about that surprise release.Do most people not know when the trigger is susposed to go off?What if your pin is not on the dot when it goes off?I have got a surprise release before,but It was more of a shock than anything.
 

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I hear about that surprise release.Do most people not know when the trigger is susposed to go off?What if your pin is not on the dot when it goes off?I have got a surprise release before,but It was more of a shock than anything.
It is a controlled supprise, you aim, tighten your muscles, aim and as you contract your back it will go off. If you get all the way contracted and it still hasn't gone off, you let down carefully so as not to accidently set it off.
This is where the practice of letting your pin float around the x comes into play. small movement is ok. the trick is to set off the release at teh same time you are right solid in your aiming.
 

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Surprise shooting with a trigger release tip....

Any chance your string has stretched? Otherwise, hate to tell you - it's all in your head. Been there, and I'm sure I'll be back there again. After a few misses you tend to get "spooked." In such situations, I have to tell myself, "it's only a freakin' deer.... I've done it before, so lets get with the program - I can do this.... So calm down...."

Shooting is 90% mental... And when I think too much about it (or too little) I have a tough time getting the shot I want. Seems I have to "be in the sweet spot." Ironically, when a deer comes in fast & close, I usually smoke it. When it comes in real slow, I usually get it too. But when it comes in "in between" I loose that "pin-it, skin-it feeling." I think it has something to do with initial reaction & adrenalin rising and falling or something...

Aside from that, it sounds like a problem I'm all too familiar with firsthand: Punching the trigger. Last year, I didn't have the problem, this year I did/do. It came back this year due to shooting problems I continue to have with my 2009 Admiral. I will probably always use a trigger release, because I can't see myself doing the back tension thing from a tree...

But heres a tip that helps me add surprise to my release timing..... (learned about it recently in one of my hunting mag. subscriptions)

Having a 27.5 inch draw, I have always shot a very short release (short as I can adjust the barrel) with extreme trigger forward design. Scott makes a great one. I don't think there is a better hunting release made! (I use the original Silverhorn, not the Silverhorn NCS)
http://www.scottarchery.com/archery-releases/string-loop-releases-silverhorn.php I even prefer it to their new Rhino XT, because it can be set softer than their new one. Have about 5000 shots on it, and no failures.

Here's the trick I read about (which just so happens to work great with my release which I have always used in the shortest position on the connector): Instead of putting the tip of your finger on the trigger, hook around the trigger so that the middle part of your finger is doing the pulling. Because you have less sensitivity and control of this part of your finger, additional "surprise" factor is added. This also has the added benefit of gaining back a touch of draw length. Also, the single hook is easy to connect. After a while, you can even learn to "hook up" by feel.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sounds good!My bow is set at 27.5" draw also I'm really 28,but with the d loop I set it at 27.5"
Any chance your string has stretched? Otherwise, hate to tell you - it's all in your head. Been there, and I'm sure I'll be back there again. After a few misses you tend to get "spooked." In such situations, I have to tell myself, "it's only a freakin' deer.... I've done it before, so lets get with the program - I can do this.... So calm down...."

Shooting is 90% mental... And when I think too much about it (or too little) I have a tough time getting the shot I want. Seems I have to "be in the sweet spot." Ironically, when a deer comes in fast & close, I usually smoke it. When it comes in real slow, I usually get it too. But when it comes in "in between" I loose that "pin-it, skin-it feeling." I think it has something to do with initial reaction & adrenalin rising and falling or something...

Aside from that, it sounds like a problem I'm all too familiar with firsthand: Punching the trigger. Last year, I didn't have the problem, this year I did/do. It came back this year due to shooting problems I continue to have with my 2009 Admiral. I will probably always use a trigger release, because I can't see myself doing the back tension thing from a tree...

But heres a tip that helps me add surprise to my release timing..... (learned about it recently in one of my hunting mag. subscriptions)

Having a 27.5 inch draw, I have always shot a very short release (short as I can adjust the barrel) with extreme trigger forward design. Scott makes a great one. I don't think there is a better hunting release made! (I use the original Silverhorn, not the Silverhorn NCS)
http://www.scottarchery.com/archery-releases/string-loop-releases-silverhorn.php I even prefer it to their new Rhino XT, because it can be set softer than their new one. Have about 5000 shots on it, and no failures.

Here's the trick I read about (which just so happens to work great with my release which I have always used in the shortest position on the connector): Instead of putting the tip of your finger on the trigger, hook around the trigger so that the middle part of your finger is doing the pulling. Because you have less sensitivity and control of this part of your finger, additional "surprise" factor is added. This also has the added benefit of gaining back a touch of draw length. Also, the single hook is easy to connect. After a while, you can even learn to "hook up" by feel.
 
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