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When tuning my new to me used Bear Arena 34 the limb stop hits the left yoke cable when trying to take out a nock right bare shaft (first picture). The second picture is the closest I can get and clear the left yoke cable but I still get a nock right.

I know I can move my arrow rest left but the the arrow won't be straight down the center and it's driving my OCD crazy. The only other option I can think of is reserve the Y yoke a little lower on the Buss cable.





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Do you have your yokes on the right side. The longer should go on the left if looking from behind I think. I can’t tell for sure from pic but looks like May be short one on left. I may be wrong but that may help.
 

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Yep, I'd add a couple inches to that yoke. I extend the yoke legs from 6" to 8" on my PSE's yokes and it solves several different problems at once. You don't want super long legs, 12" or more would start to run into possible clearance problems, but stock yokes are usually really short like this for some reason and can give problems....

At the point you're at it might be better overall to just have a whole new one made as it might be major surgery to undo a buss cable at the yoke end - could unspool into quite a mess. Maybe serve below the existing serving first, then take the old serving above it off....

Here's how I make the yoke for my PSE's buss cable:

lee

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Discussion Starter #6
Do you have your yokes on the right side. The longer should go on the left if looking from behind I think. I can’t tell for sure from pic but looks like May be short one on left. I may be wrong but that may help.
Thanks Larry for suggesting checking the length of the legs. I thought of that also but they are both the same length when Twisted the same.

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Usually I have one that’s twisted up good and one that’s got a few twist in it. That may be issue if they are twisted the same. I think the last set I had had 2 twist per yoke and I ended up adding 3 to one side and made it perfect. I have seen yokes made lower but never really knew why, this may be the reason.


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At brace, lay an arrow on the left side of the cam and see where it crosses the string. A good starting point would be to have it cross just above the nock point. You shouldn't have to shim the cam, your shims look appropriate for that bow. How long are the legs on your yokes? If they're too short, they won't give proper clearance. Most Hybrid Bear bows have around 7" yoke legs.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
At brace, lay an arrow on the left side of the cam and see where it crosses the string. A good starting point would be to have it cross just above the nock point. You shouldn't have to shim the cam, your shims look appropriate for that bow. How long are the legs on your yokes? If they're too short, they won't give proper clearance. Most Hybrid Bear bows have around 7" yoke legs.
I did that already and attached is the way the arrow looks. This is with the limb stop barely clearing the left yoke. Yet I get a nock right. I also noticed when I nock my arrow it's super tight I wondering if that might be a contributing factor. It's not nock pinch by the D-loop, but the serving underneath is thicker than all my other bows.

I'm starting to wonder maybe I should have my serving redone on the string first before I shim anything.







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I did that already and attached is the way the arrow looks. This is with the limb stop barely clearing the left yoke. Yet I get a nock right. I also noticed when I nock my arrow it's super tight I wondering if that might be a contributing factor. It's not nock pinch by the D-loop, but the serving underneath is thicker than all my other bows.

I'm starting to wonder maybe I should have my serving redone on the string first before I shim anything.







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Definitely get your nock fit squared away before you go chasing your tail trying to tune out a bad nock fit.
 

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Usually I have one that’s twisted up good and one that’s got a few twist in it. That may be issue if they are twisted the same. I think the last set I had had 2 twist per yoke and I ended up adding 3 to one side and made it perfect. I have seen yokes made lower but never really knew why, this may be the reason.


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Yep, that's one of the reasons for longer yokes rather than shorter; it helps with the one-super-twisted-up-the-other-with-no-turns in it syndrome. Longer legs also reduce the amount of change in length of a half or whole turn allowing finer adjustment (the even-a-half-turn-is-too-dang-much syndrome).

The other reasons are clearance from string/limb stops on the cam as in this example bow and less sharp bends against the outboard yoke hangers. That helps preserve the end serving and reduce separation on the loops even if the edges on the hangers are properly rounded.

This is one of the main reasons I started making my own cables, to experiment with yoke leg length to get something that has the fewest syndromes and works the best on my bows.

Really short yokes seem to be common on a lot of OEM buss cables for some reason. I suspect clearance reasons for stabs, weights or string stops if you want them in the upper part of the handle, etc....

lee.
 

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Yep, that's one of the reasons for longer yokes rather than shorter; it helps with one-super-twisted-up-the-other-with-no-turns in it syndrome. Longer legs also reduce the amount of change in length of a half or whole turn allowing finer adjustment (the even-a-half-turn-is-too-dang-much syndrome).

The other reasons are clearance from string/limb stops on the cam as in this example bow and less sharp bends against the outboard yoke hangars. That helps preserve the end serving and reduce separation on the loops even if the edges on the hangars are properly rounded.

This is one of the main reasons I started making my own cables, to experiment with yoke leg length to get something that has the fewest syndromes and works the best on my bows.

Really short yokes seem to be common on a lot of OEM buss cables for some reason.....

lee.
I guess I haven’t ran into it with Hoyt and now PSE. But I have custom strings so maybe they build em like your saying to eliminate that.



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I guess I haven’t ran into it with Hoyt and now PSE. But I have custom strings so maybe they build em like your saying to eliminate that.
Yeah definitely could be (the builders on here are experts unlike myself so they probably already redesigned the yokes on their products). The stock ABBs that originally came on my PSE when I bought it back in the Stone Age had 6" yoke legs on the buss. It was barely enough tho as the loose leg was always just about completely unwound and the tight one looked like it was going to coil up on itself :). So I just added 2" when I started making my own and that made it perfect.

So yeah just depends on the bow and who made the original strings for it, I guess....

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I make my standard yoke at 7.5". My personal bows are 8.5" because you can do finer tuning with longer yoke legs. I have run into a bow, the Bear Strike, that had to have a 5" yoke or one of the legs would contact the top string stop. That's the only one where bigger wasn't better. If your bow has a longer ATA than 30", chances are having longer yokes won't hurt. If they get too long, you could run into problems on shorter bows when they get to the cable slide.
 
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