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I need new arrows single cam 100grain 62# 29"
gt hunterpro 340 .001straight 1%grain total weight 281.3grains $115approx
gtxthunter 340 .003st 2%grain total weight 281.3grains $85 approx
c e maxima .0025 1%grain total weight 232 grains $130approx
easton fmj .003 2% total weight 322
xx78 .0015 1% 299 grains $70 approx

when I see these numbers and take straightness out of a dozen, weight and price the xx78 look very nice. I know that the carbon is a faster shaft but only if you by the top end arrows. when you see the nice groups you get from aluminum, the price, and energy down range I wonder if everyone is happier to shoot at 60 yards or more effectively at 40. But does everyone by their carbon arrows by the dozen then sort through them for the straightest? Diameter of the shaft on a gt is .300 and a xx78 is .375 with a crosswind is there that much difference. I don't mind switching to carbon or a carbon + aluminum butm at 40 yards give me a good reason why. Thanks
 

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2nd time around said:
I need new arrows single cam 100grain 62# 29"
gt hunterpro 340 .001straight 1%grain total weight 281.3grains $115approx
gtxthunter 340 .003st 2%grain total weight 281.3grains $85 approx
c e maxima .0025 1%grain total weight 232 grains $130approx
easton fmj .003 2% total weight 322
xx78 .0015 1% 299 grains $70 approx

when I see these numbers and take straightness out of a dozen, weight and price the xx78 look very nice. I know that the carbon is a faster shaft but only if you by the top end arrows. when you see the nice groups you get from aluminum, the price, and energy down range I wonder if everyone is happier to shoot at 60 yards or more effectively at 40. But does everyone by their carbon arrows by the dozen then sort through them for the straightest? Diameter of the shaft on a gt is .300 and a xx78 is .375 with a crosswind is there that much difference. I don't mind switching to carbon or a carbon + aluminum butm at 40 yards give me a good reason why. Thanks

Are you a target shooter mostly
or a hunter primarily?

Do you usually shoot NFAA field (up to 80 yds)
or mostly 3D tournaments?

It really depends on what type of shooting you like to do?

For hunting, you could go with aluminum or carbon.
There are advantages and disadvantages for both.

For a 3D shooter, they usually want the fastest and lightest possible arrow.

For NFAA field, you want medium weight and the narrow to medium outside diameter. The all carbon shafts are popular, and if you can afford it,
the hybrid aluminum core with a carbon exterior arrow shafts are popular as well.


If your maximum range is 40yds,
then I would say that a aluminum hunting arrow is hard to beat. They might get a few dings / dents. The higher weight will get you more kinetic energy.

Carbon shafts get more expensive each year.

For long range target shooting, carbon is the superior choice.
 

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Arrows

Nut & Bolts has good points, you have to know your purpose. I use XX78 2315's for league in the winter because of the fat shaft. For hunting I use Easton ST Axis 340's, lighter,faster,and they don't bend, they break! As for the down range energy some the carbons, have between 10.1 to 12.5 or more grains/per inch possibly. You can get more grain/per inch with the metal insert/ with carbon over the top arrow, but they will still bend. I like carbon for hunting because you can shoot multiple animals most of the time with the same arrow, they don't bend. You have to hit something very hard to shatter them. You can also vary your grains, depending on what you want.

Shoot straight & shoot often,

Boonie
 

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The guys made good points ( no pun intended). Something to consider is that a carbon shaft (GT-XT) that is .003 will be closer to .002 till you cut it down to length.

Another is that it will stay straight shot after shot. Aluminum can bend and dent, crease or just lose straightness over time. I think that to justify shooting aluminum you should have your own arrow straightener. Not a big deal, but just something to use for comparison.

As for cost of top shafts. There aren't too many people in this world who can shoot well eough to tell the difference between .003" and .001". I sure am not one of them. I can tell the difference between .006 and .003"

I'm not quite as sure about the effects of differences in weight tolerance, but I think too much is made of it. I don't think, from experience, that you'll be able to shoot well enough to tell even 5 gr difference from shaft to shaft till you start shooting at about or in excess of 60 yards.

I agree, too, that you have to make your own choice based on your personal application.

As much as I have shot aluminum in the past and still do accasionally there is no denying that decent carbon arrows truely are more economical in the long run.
 
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