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I need some advice...

387 Views 4 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  WrongdayJ
Hi, my name is David, I'm 15 years old, and I've rescently decided to really get into archery. I've been saving up for a while now and today I went down to a local archery shop, and I've been trying to decide weather to get a Recurve or a Compound. I origionally went thinking I was going to get myself a nice Recurve bow, however now I'm not so sure. I can pull about 40 lbs and my draw length is approx 25". I plan on hunting and target shooting with the bow. What are your opinions on each bow? What do you think I should do? Any thoughts on the matter are appriciated.
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Hi, my name is David, I'm 15 years old, and I've rescently decided to really get into archery. I've been saving up for a while now and today I went down to a local archery shop, and I've been trying to decide weather to get a Recurve or a Compound. I origionally went thinking I was going to get myself a nice Recurve bow, however now I'm not so sure. I can pull about 40 lbs and my draw length is approx 25". I plan on hunting and target shooting with the bow. What are your opinions on each bow? What do you think I should do? Any thoughts on the matter are appriciated.
If you started with a recurve for hunting you would have to get at least 40 pound recurve to be hunting legal. trouble with recurves is they take a long time to learn how to shoot them longer to learn how to shoot them accurately. So that is the downside plus you have to hold the whole draw weight while aiming which makes it hard.

Componds have a thing called let off, when at full draw your 40 pounds lets off to 10 or 12. this makes shooting them easier and you can be more accurate sooner. For hunting this is a plus cause you can be ready to hunt next season if you started now. so being 15 I would recommend a compound that is draw length adjustable that could grow with you for a few years.
 

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If you started with a recurve for hunting you would have to get at least 40 pound recurve to be hunting legal. trouble with recurves is they take a long time to learn how to shoot them longer to learn how to shoot them accurately. So that is the downside plus you have to hold the whole draw weight while aiming which makes it hard.

Componds have a thing called let off, when at full draw your 40 pounds lets off to 10 or 12. this makes shooting them easier and you can be more accurate sooner. For hunting this is a plus cause you can be ready to hunt next season if you started now. so being 15 I would recommend a compound that is draw length adjustable that could grow with you for a few years.
Definitely good advice. Recurves do require more work to shoot well.

I would also suggest that if you go with a compound, you look at going with 40-50# rather than maxing out at 40. You are still going to grow a bit and get stronger as you shoot more. Getting a higher max weight and backing off the weight to what you can pull now will give you some additional flexibility later on. I almost did something simliar when I ordered my bow. Glad I listened to the pro shop folks to get the next higher draw weight.
 

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With respect to Bees and SCarson, how can advising a young archer to spend his hard earned dollars on a compound over a recurve simply because they are easier to shoot be the best advice? I happen to believe that there is more to the sport of archery than that. And again,I say that with respect.

BBXA,

The best advice that I can offer is that you owe it to yourself to at least try out both before you buy and make your own decision. Some people love their compounds and others (like me) love their recurves (or longbows). One thing is true and that is a vast majority of us have experience with both but something within us gravitates us one direction or the other.

Todd
 

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I agree with the previous posters, but I think wte makes a great point. . .

Your best bet is to go to your friendly neighborhood archery shop and try out both styles. Talk to the staff. Fling some arrows. They will be more than happy to help you try out as many bows as you like. It's their job.

Compounds have their strengths and weaknesses, and so do recurves.

Some people actually feel comfortable shooting both (like me).

You can't lose either way. . .which ever bow you choose will get you out there shooting and enjoying Archery (plus, you can always buy ANOTHER bow later if you want. . .)
 
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