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To all that are hunting Canada. The meta animal ban has been lifted. There are some things you have to do to get your meat back, but you can bring it home. I recieved the news about 5 pm today. You can thank Jay McAninch from the ATA for all his work. There are many others also, but he spearheaded the job. For more on the subject email me and I will send what I have.
Joe
 

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U.S. lifts ban on some Canadian beef products, but not live animals

The United States is lifting its ban on some Canadian beef products, but the border will remain closed to live animals, the U.S. secretary of agriculture said Friday.

Anne Veneman said acceptable products will include meat from cattle under the age of 30 months, veal from calves 36 weeks or younger and fresh or frozen beef liver.

It’s unlikely any beef will begin crossing the border before the end of the month, however, she said.

The United States closed its border almost immediately May 20 when a single case of mad cow disease was confirmed in an Alberta black Angus cow.

“We closely reviewed the (international) standards for BSE, the investigation conducted by Canada and the international expert panel review of the investigation,” Veneman said.

“In addition, we reviewed the Canadian system of beef processing and production and concluded it has been and continues to be based on a strong foundation of BSE preventative measures.”

U.S. officials had already indicated they believe Canadian beef is safe.

But a decision allowing beef to freely flow south has been prevented by America’s key beef trading partner, Japan, which has said it will not accept U.S. beef if trade resumed between Canada and the U.S. without safeguards such as country of origin labelling.

Canada’s embattled beef industry has been hoping for some kind of trade breakthrough.

It has hemorrhaged millions of dollars and thousands of jobs since the case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy -- also known as BSE or mad cow disease -- was confirmed in the Alberta breeder cow. All major export markets, including the United States, then closed their borders to Canadian beef.

Other products that will be allowed across the border include boneless sheep or goat meat from animals under 12 months of age, vaccines for veterinary medicine for non-ruminant use and pet food.

Veneman also said the United States will immediately begin a “rule-making process” that would enable the imports of live cattle under the age of 30 months, but no timeline was given.

Japan has set a Sept. 1 deadline for the U.S. to provide assurances its beef is free of Canadian product. The Asian nation had its own mad cow scare in 2001 and has set up strict regulations on its cattle industry. Its agriculture minister has said Canada’s rules may be too lax.

For Canada, the United States is the make-or-break market. In 2002, Canadians exported $1.8 billion of beef products to the U.S. The second-largest importer, Mexico, came in at $200 million and Japan was $81 million

In all, 34 countries have banned Canadian beef.

More than 90,000 beef producers across Canada have been losing an estimated $11 million a day since the crisis began, a figure that doesn’t include the steep price drops for cattle on Canadian auction blocks.

Western producers have been hardest hit as they account for 70 per cent of beef production. Canada exported 1.7 million live cattle in 2002.

http://www.canada.com/calgary/story.asp?id=5273DB19-5D15-4999-9F82-084010C66C12
 

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Joe Barbieur;

Up here we are a little more concerned about beef cattle than meat from hunting expeditions. I think there is pretty much a 0.00001% likely hood that a wild game animal would ever contract BSD - unless it had taken up canabalism as a hobby...

;)

I can't see why game animals wouldn't be taken off the restricted list quite quickly..

-CG
 
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