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New Kid
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Discussion Starter #1
Shooting a Samick Sage 25# with a 26" draw length and full-length arrows, my point-on distance is somewhere around 20 yards. Barebow, no sights, high anchor, three under.

I've got an eye on doing field archery eventually, out to 80 yards. So far the longest I've shot is 30 yards and for that I'm aiming above the bale.

Is it somehow possible to "increase" my point-on distance so I have an easier time aiming at longer distances?
 

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That's great you're able to have a 20 yard point on. Lots of archers struggle to achieve that.

A lower anchor point will increase your point on distance. I use the "C mandible" anchor for field, the web between the thumb and forefinger against the corner of the jaw. As said, using shorter and lighter arrows helps too.
 

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If you're headed toward field archery I suspect your best/easiest option is to lower your anchor.
 

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With a 25# and 26" draw you are not going to have a good trajectory. It is going to arc badly so I would look into string walking or the real low anchor.
I too have a 20 yard point on sighting. I shoot three under with a high anchor, but I am shooting a 420 grain arrow at 200 fps with a 28" draw and just over twice you draw weight. Even then shots to 30 and 40 yards require a substantial hold-over. I have not attempted anything past 40 so , my hats off to you for going the big distance.
Recurves are all prone to an arcing trajectory to some degree or another. It is something we have to recognize and compensate for such.
 

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Shorter, lighter spined arrows with lighter points, and, if you haven't already, a high performance string like BCY-X or 8190. Farther PO with more consistent gaps.
 

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As others have stated:
Lighter, shorter arrows with smaller fletches is the answer for longer range.

-Grant
 

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s -

Most of the recommendations will make only small differences.

If you want a farther point on, odds are you'll have to lower your anchor and switch to split*.

*That assumes you're using the correct arrows in the first place.
1516s would be as heavy as I'd go.

With a std trad anchor/split my wife has a 40 yd point on with a 25# bow/1516s, but a slightly longer DL.
That's not uncommon, and with an Oly anchor, I've had people reach 60 yds without running out of sight travel at that weight

Viper1 out.
 

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New Kid
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all your suggestions.

1) I already have light arrows ... they are have .950 deflection, with 70 grain tips and 1.8" vanes and are about 233 grains TOTAL. They are matched pretty well with the bow weight/DL. Afraid if I cut them shorter they would become too stiff.

2) I have an elevated rest.

3) I have a fast-flight string.

So, looking like I need to go lower anchor, which is pretty much what I thought would be the case.
 

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Yes, a lower anchor and use a split finger hold on the string if you do not do it already, rather than three fingers under. I would also trim one or two of your arrows a bit at a time, and get lighter points if you can, and see if they will tune well.

It would help a lot if you can learn a longer draw length and a good coach could be very helpful with that. The JOAD, Junior Olympic Archery Program, has coaches that are used to light bows and short draw lengths. Once you have taken your draw length about as far as it is likely to go, which may be nearly two inches more than you have now, trim arrows to not extend past the back of the bow, and tune to that length. This may well require new arrows but you have got to do it to maximize your range.

I have helped a number of 'light archers' youths, women, and disabled. I suggest to them a goal of working up to the youth stakes on the field course, which have a maximum distance of 50 yards. That distance also encompasses most 3D events. The NFAA has authorized clubs to offer this option for competition to traditional archers. So you may never need to shoot farther.

With proper technique and tackle this can work out very well. The most accurate archers in the world are light archers, the girls and women of Korea.

I have left for last the notion of switching to heavier limbs. Develop your best form, with some good coaching, using your present limbs. Once that is done most light archers, including young teen girls, can work up to 30 pound limbs and more. But learn the form first.

And kindly keep us informed of your progress. - lbg
 

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Trad Shooter
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Sprinke -

You've already gotten some great advice from some of the more experienced archers here. I've only been shooting about 1.5 years, but my equipment setup is very similar to yours, so I thought I'd throw out my own observations:

My bow: #25 Sage, Fast Flight Plus string (from 3 Rivers Archery, $17.50), elevated rest (Hoyt "super rest").
Arrows: 800 spine carbon with 3" feathers. I think my points are a little lighter than yours (65 gr with 44 gr inserts?).
My draw length: 28".
Anchor position: As described by Arrowwood.

My point-on distance is 30 yards when I shoot 3-under and 50 yards when I shoot "split". Incidentally, a lot of people would like to have a 20-yard point on for indoor tournaments!
 

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New Kid
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Discussion Starter #13
This morning I went out and tried split finger and anchoring with my index finger at corner of mouth (I had been using middle finger) and it made a vast difference in the sight picture. Went out to 30 yards and was still aiming significantly below the spot, so the point-on will be further. I could get used to it. Tomorrow I have some free time in the afternoon so I think I'll try a walk-back and see if I can find the point-on distance.

QUESTION: Are you allowed to change anchor points during a field round in NFAA competition? Is that considered facewalking?

ANOTHER QUESTION: Many of you have suggested cutting the arrows shorter. Is this simply to make the arrow's total weight less so it will fly further?
 

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Shorter arrow brings the point closer, and relative to your eye's perspective, lower, making the elevation of the trajectory, relative to the reference of the point, higher.

Changing anchor points is face walking. I believe it is usually allowed in classes that6 allow string walking. That would not be NFAA trad division.
 

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Instead of changing your point on - find reference point on your arrow/bow to hold on for different distances. An example, where my arrow and rest cross, if I put that X on the spot I'm on at 50 yards. It takes a little tinkering to find what works but can be a very effective way to shoot longer ranges.
 

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Barney -

Not necessarily.
She could just find a better overall anchor.

A 20 yd point on implies a pretty high anchor, kinda useless for anything else.

Viper1 out.
 

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How high is your nock point? lower it bit and see what happen. Fletched arrows only. Someone here said they shot more than one over. When I shoot my compound I shoot the two middle fingers under.
Dan
 

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New Kid
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Discussion Starter #18
Today I did a walk back from 5 yards to 80. With my new anchor point and shooting split, I found my point-on to be around 40 yards. This was my first time shooting anything longer than 30 yards so I consider it a personal triumph that I was able to keep most arrows on the bale out to 80 yards. :D
 
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