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Discussion Starter #1
Folks, I’m new here and only have a handful of posts. I’m a complete beginner, but I’m really enjoying archery with my daughters.

I got a Bear Cruzer at the end of April, and upgraded to a Hoyt Defiant a little over a month later so I could set up the Bear for my oldest. The Bear was at 40 pounds for me, the Hoyt at 50. Draw length is 28 inches if it matters.

At first the Hoyt was too heavy, but I worked with it until now, and about a month and a half in its as easy as the Cruzer was when I got it. My question is, obviously I don’t want another 10 pound jump but I’d like to work up to the 60 pound draw weight the bow can provide. Do I do this 1 turn at a time, or 2, or 5 pounds at a time? When is a good time to increase? After a month after it becomes easier to draw, or longer? Etc.

Any advice is much appreciated. I feel like I can increase now, but I want to be sure to avoid injury and bad form. Thanks in advance.
 

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i don't know your setup and how many pounds one turn equates to but you could try 1/4 turn every couple weeks if you are shooting regularly. though, you may only need a half of a turn to get to where you want to be for this season. shooting low poundage bows can be a nice treat if you have the time to shoot all day.

just remember to keep the turns equal on each limb or you'll throw off the sync of the cams. you will may also need to re tune as you go up and check you arrow spine. if it's the same arrows from your 40lb bow you may need a stiffer arrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i don't know your setup and how many pounds one turn equates to but you could try 1/4 turn every couple weeks if you are shooting regularly. though, you may only need a half of a turn to get to where you want to be for this season. shooting low poundage bows can be a nice treat if you have the time to shoot all day.

just remember to keep the turns equal on each limb or you'll throw off the sync of the cams. you will may also need to re tune as you go up and check you arrow spine. if it's the same arrows from your 40lb bow you may need a stiffer arrow.
Thanks. Arrows are 400 spine which is correct per the charts, but my next increase puts it at 340. I’ll get a fresh set when I do.

I’ve considered going up to 54-56 and staying there for the season. That may be the best way to go.

Thanks again.
 

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The first thing you need to ask yourself is whether or not you really need to increase DW... Are you looking for more hitting power while hunting? Are you looking for a little faster arrow and a flatter trajectory for 3D? If you're just plunking targets in the backyard or local club, the only real reason to increase is ego... As long as you can stick in the target without hitting the ceiling you've got enough umph.

Some advantages to shooting a lighter weight is the ease on the shoulders, and you can maintain form for more shots before fatigue sets in and form breaks down.

So, here's a useless and vague answer to how much and when... When it feels right to you and only enough that you can still control the draw and shot from beginning of the session to the end. Can you sit on a chair, lift your feet, and draw comfortably? Do you have to sky draw or draw at angles where you're not pointing directly at the target through the entire draw cycle? Are you planning on ever shooting leagues [especially indoor spots or outdoor 900 rounds]? If so, you don't want to increase to the point, or too early that, you can't maintain form and not feel fatigue after 60-100 shots... Typically 5 shots within 4min with a couple min rest...

As for how many turns, every model bow is different. Some might increase 4lbs per turn of the limb bolts; others 1-2lbs. Mark the bolt and a spot on the bow so you can keep track of how much you turn the bolts, and make sure to turn them equally. Depending on your rest it may need to be retimed/adjusted as you increase. Also consider the need to purchase new shafts as you increase.

My $0.02
[Which is worthless after inflation...]
 

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Try one turn each top & bottom, don't know- but you're probably 2-3lbs a turn. Try that & see if your pin float stays steady and your patterns stay tight. More than poundage, educate yourself on good shooting form... practice it & make it repeatable.
 

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If you shoot daily turn it up one turn and shoot it for a week or 2 then add another turn. When you turn it up and it feel to heavy and uncomfortable turn it down 1/2 and try. Always keep it to where it is comfortable for you and you execute a smooth draw. By the way, welcome to AT.
 

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The Impartial Archer
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IMHO people worry too much about draw weight. Shoot the bow and enjoy it. If you shoot enough and it gets really easy to pull increase the weight then. If it's doesn't get easier there are other alternatives than struggling with bow weight.
 

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Hunter of many things
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Crank it up until your accuracy is effected, which also means form is effected. IF you are young and still growing then dont force it, strength will come.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks folks -- I'll do the sitting down, feet up draw test and see how that goes to determine whether to increase now. I think I'll be fine -- I'm not skying the bow at all on the draw. It just stays on plane toward the target. I didn't really raise it when I went from 40-50 either, but it was a significantly harder pull a month ago than it is now. Now it's just easy every time.

I'll report back when I get a couple of turns under my belt.
 

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You can go to the 340 shafts and leave them long, use hot melt on the inserts so you can remove them. Cut the arrows shorter as you turn the bow up, 1 inch is equal to about 5 pounds of draw weight. If you hold the tips in a pan of boiling water for 20 seconds you can remove the points and inserts with pliers easily when the hot melt gets soft. You can also add 25 grains of point weight and it will weaken the dynamic spine of the arrow 5 pounds. Refer to the Gold tip spine selection chart as they show what happens with 100, 125, and 150 grain points. Good luck
 

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I'm a big proponent of shooting the highest poundage you can COMFORTABLY draw and hold for minutes at a time. I see far too often guys cranking their bow up to 70lbs and struggle to draw the bow back PROPERLY. When you draw back you should be using your back and not dropping your elbow and condesing your shoulder. You can hurt yourself and ruin a shoulder very easily by not drawing back a bow correctly. All this being said, when I first started shooting I could pull back and hold 63lbs comfortably. I shoot everyday and by the end of my second week I could pull 70lbs no problem. I know it's subjective and everyone is different but do not start cranking up your poundage until you can comfortably draw and hold back the weight you are currently shooting. Then I would slowly increase the weight by 1-2 lbs until you are at your comfortable max limit.
 
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