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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am wanting to set up a target at work. We have a warehouse that will allow me to shot 17 yards. The problem is that the backstop is an adjoining wall to another business. Basic 2x4 drywalled wall. I am trying to figure out what material to use behind my target to keep my arrows from passing through the wall if I miss? (like that would ever happen... :tongue: ) would a couple of layers of 3/4" plywood be sufficient? I am not wanting to invest a ton of money in the backstop, and don't really care if the arrow gets destroyed on a chance miss. Just want to make sure an arrow doesn't pass through the wall. I pull 70lbs and shoot carbon arrows with 100g tips.
 

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Horse stall mats from Tractor Supply or somewhere similar; Not against the wall but give it a little space, and hang them [don't secure to the floor.

Mats will stop about anything, and free hanging will absorb more energy before a pass through.
 

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indoor archery set up

All I can say is be careful! Be extra careful !! Be extra, extra careful. Two sheets of 3/4" will give you the protection that you need as far as depth. My concern would be how large the wall is because it would have to be protected from floor to ceiling and a sufficient width, I'd say at least 16' and that's assuming you have good form. I'm sure there would be some insurance concerns based on your activity and Murphy's law comes into play. Not what you want to hear and I'm sure others will chime in. I hope you achieve your set up. And: the horse mats would be a better choice of materials.
 

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Look at an indoor archery range some time. Pay particular attention to the side walls and the ceiling. My Gut's telling me this is a bad idea all the way around.
 

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While it may seem alright, in my opinion, I think I would pass on this and shoot somewhere else. A lot can/could go wrong.
 

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20190202_161030.jpg For my indoor range I went a little overboard. Not only do I have large targets I used 2 layers of horse stall rubber matting (1 on front of OSB and 1 behind the 3" foam board), OSB plywood, 3" closed cell foam and 2 layers of 2x10's running both vertical and horizontal. After I finished it I should have only used 1 layer of matting and saved some cost. The rubber matting is ~$38 a sheet 4'x6' unless you catch it on sale. The other day I had a misfire with a back tension and the arrow never made it past the matting out of a 53lb Wake with fat shafts.
 

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I would like to add one more voice to those concerned posters above. I have seen premature fires from broken releases and one arrow through the wall and that could spell disaster and or fines. Have you talked with the other business-- they have a role in your decision-- you do not have the right to put them in any danger. Can't blame you for wanting to shoot at work when you have the time but safety is first second and third on the list and over trumps all else.
 

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If something bad does happen, you'll have to change your username
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the input! I am starting to realize that its probably not a good decision to set up the range in the warehouse. :( I will definitely not set it up unless I am 100% confident that it's safe. The prospect of being able to fire a few arrows over my lunch break is pretty enticing, but I definitely don't want to cause any damage, or worse, hurt someone in the process. I may take some materials with some junk arrows to my local range and test the stopping power. Even if I don't set up the range it would be fun to see what an arrow is capable of passing through...
 
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