Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I posted this in the general archery talk, but thought I might get more specific info here. I have a Bear Kodiak that was my dad's It has been sitting in the closet unstrung (though I have the old string) for 35 years. I have been told it is ok to shoot, but have some questions.

Where do I get a new string and how do i safely string it? If I need something to string it where do I get that?

Does anyone have an idea of what it is worth (though I would never sell it), and about what year it was made?

What kind of arrows do I use, and where should I get those?

I really appreciate the info I get here.

Thanks in advance.

Terry


PS, I am very new to archery, so bear with me.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
855 Posts
Hard to tell by the picture but your bow is either a 1956 or 57. If it has dual arrow shelfs and can be shot off either side 56. Single shelf 57.

It would take a 56" dacron B50 string. Always use a bow stringer when stringing a recurve. You can purchase a string, bow stringer and arrows from 3Rivers archery or other traditional archery suppliers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the info, it has a single shelf. Ok, stupid question. What is the best thing to use on my fingers for gripping the string?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
855 Posts
Again, personal choice on the arrows. Many would argue that cedar arrows are the proper arrow for a vintage Bear such as yours. Wood arrows would certainly be more period correct. I only shot cedars for years but now days I mostly shoot carbons because they are so durable. Although I have a few old Bears I rarely shoot the ones from the fifties and older.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,165 Posts
very neat,
i have a bear kodiac special 68" at 49# that was my grandpa's, and have wondered all the same things...

very neat piece of history anyways
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
855 Posts
Many people shoot and hunt with their vintage bows a great deal without a problem. As long as there are no limb twist, tip overlays loose or other issues there should be no problem. It might be a good idea to have someone with experience check it over for any potential problems before you string it and begin shooting it.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top