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I am not arguing that sharper is not better, even with today's equipment. You should use sharp broadheads. However, I personally don't think it is as critical as it was 20 years ago. I used to not use a head that wasn't sharp enough to shave hair and would cut a rubber band by passing it slowly over it. The old adage was that if it wouldn't cut a rubber band, the BH edge would just push arteries and veins aside and not cut them as it passed through the animal. Today's arrows go into targets so fast that they sometimes heat up the target material and melt it onto the shaft! I would bet you money that such an arrow, even slowing down as it passes hair, hide, tissue, etc., that it will cut what it passes even if it is only "sharp" and not "scary sharp".

What caused me to think of this was reading those broadhead tests published in Peterson's Bowhunting mag (?) a few months ago. There was a fair degree of variability in sharpness from the sharpest to the "dullest" broadhead tested. People complain about Rage sharpness, but they sure make a bloody mess when they pass through an animal's vitals.

Just wondering if anyone has thought about this and what do you think? I'm certainly not going to argue against sharpness, but I don't think I'll dismantle any new, unshot broadheads to put additional edge on them.
 

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I agree and just use new blades every time. I don't think it is a good idea to be using blades that have been shot into a target, or worse yet, through an animal already(without resharpening).
 

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Depends a lot on your setup, slow light arrows need sharp IMO, slow heavy arrows (traditional ) need sharp as well, the only time I don't see a need for " scary" sharp is if your shooting heavy arrows super fast, that would go through anything a little easier, so IMO, scary sharp has importance , I like to get mine as sharp as I can, saying too sharp is kinda like saying too much penetration, IMO


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I want mine to be as sharp as they ever can be.
Even if you shoot a super fast bow with heavy arrows, it is the best to have super sharp blades.
How the blood reacts from being smashed or quickly and cleanly cut is very different.
This might not be so important on perfect hits, but this can be very important on not so perfect hits.
 

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I want mine scary sharp all the time. Deer blood clots a whole lot faster than human blood so I want any deer I shoot to bleed until the moment they hit the ground. A cut with a scalpul/razor will not clot up as quickly as a cut with something less sharp. I suppose for the perfect shot through the heart it doesn't matter as much but for any shot that is less than perfect I prefer scary sharp.
 

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The sharpness of the broadhead will never become less important. Arrows kill by hemorrhage and cutting major vessels. Speed doesn't have anything to do with cutting ability, sharpness of the blade does.
 

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The sharpness of the broadhead will never become less important. Arrows kill by hemorrhage and cutting major vessels. Speed doesn't have anything to do with cutting ability, sharpness of the blade does.
Exactly what I was thinking. To answer th op's ? If it doesn't then it ought to.
 

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I to agree that we owe it to ourselves to go to the woods with the sharpest best performing head we can shoot, but speed does have a ton to do with how a broadhead cuts. Pressure + velocity = cutting. So given the pressure of the tissue pushing on the blades are equal, a super fast dull blade will cut with a slow sharp blade. But when we are talking about penetration there are a lot more factors to figure in. Bottom line, get them as sharp as you can. You can never have to penetration ;)
 

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To much penetration is what I meant to say.
 

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The sharpness of the broadhead will never become less important. Arrows kill by hemorrhage and cutting major vessels. Speed doesn't have anything to do with cutting ability, sharpness of the blade does.
Agreed. The sharper the better in my book.
 

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Scary sharp is what we as hunters should strive for to be more humane killers. A deer shot with scary sharp broad heads will hemorrhage better and for a longer period of time. Scary sharp blades also cause the vessels/veins/arteries to retract into the surrounding tissue, like a taught cut rubber band. This retraction also helps the vein/vessels/artery free bleed and be less likely to clot. Tissue cut with duller blades tends to leave ragged cuts which clot faster. I always have the sharpest blades I can on my broad heads.
 

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Here's my take...I like my heads to be as sharp as they can be, but don't want them to be as sharp as possible. As sharp as possible means a thinner blade, and a narrower grind. Which means less durability, and quicker dulling. A surgeons scalpel is sharper than b-heads, but way less durable, as a simplistic comparison. it ain't cutting through hair, bone, etc. So sharp with durability and edge retention so that it ain't dull when it comes out the other side. As far as bleeding and the amount...don't really care that much, it the shot is where it needs to be, it ain't dieing because it bleeds to death technically. If it dies because it bleeds to death, them the shot wasn't where it needed to be.
 

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The sharpness of the broadhead will never become less important. Arrows kill by hemorrhage and cutting major vessels. Speed doesn't have anything to do with cutting ability, sharpness of the blade does.
I agree 100%

Sorta. Paper isn't sharp...but run your finger across the edge of it quickly, and it cuts. Same with cardboard, plastic, and a few other materials. The item is not 'sharp' by its nature, but add some speed and friction...and it becomes 'sharp'. Similar concept to the 'Atom' head.
 

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I sharpen every head, new or used on a Lansky and will not shhot an animal with anything other than shaving sharp.
 

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I like sharp broadheads no doubt. On the other hand, have you guys ever seen that broadhead called the atom by Aerodynamic solutions. The blade is not really sharp at all, but it has killed all kinds of animals. I've never used the head, but i know people who have killed hogs and deer with it.
 

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Back in high school I hunted with a good buddy and he and I were understandably low on funds. He practiced and hunted with the same muzzy heads, never replaced blades and shot deer with them. He made good shots but I have to admit his tracking jobs were a major chore, very little blood even with good penetration. The first buck he ever shot got away, we tracked it for what seemed like forever, little blood here little blood there and he was convinced he made a good shot. From now on I don't take chances, keep em sharp and don't worry about the what if, the animal deserves the best.
 

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Here's my take...I like my heads to be as sharp as they can be, but don't want them to be as sharp as possible. As sharp as possible means a thinner blade, and a narrower grind. Which means less durability, and quicker dulling. A surgeons scalpel is sharper than b-heads, but way less durable, as a simplistic comparison. it ain't cutting through hair, bone, etc. So sharp with durability and edge retention so that it ain't dull when it comes out the other side. As far as bleeding and the amount...don't really care that much, it the shot is where it needs to be, it ain't dieing because it bleeds to death technically. If it dies because it bleeds to death, them the shot wasn't where it needed to be.
It is exactly when it comes to less than perfect shots, a very sharp broad head is important even with a high KE/momentum setup.
And that is the time where you really want the animal to bleed as much, fast and long as possible.
One of the main reasons for why people can't find a deer that is less than perfectly hit, is because they can't find blood on the ground anymore because the blood has clotted and stopped the bleeding.
The longer it takes before the blood clotting stops the bleeding, the larger are the chances for the deer to die and also die faster and it also increases the chances for the hunter to find blood on the ground to track.

Anyone that hasn't made a less than perfect shot yet, has not hunted enough.
 

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It is exactly when it comes to less than perfect shots, a very sharp broad head is important even with a high KE/momentum setup.
And that is the time where you really want the animal to bleed as much, fast and long as possible.
One of the main reasons for why people can't find a deer that is less than perfectly hit, is because they can't find blood on the ground anymore because the blood has clotted and stopped the bleeding.
The longer it takes before the blood clotting stops the bleeding, the larger are the chances for the deer to die and also die faster and it also increases the chances for the hunter to find blood on the ground to track.

Anyone that hasn't made a less than perfect shot yet, has not hunted enough.
Ok...and if a blade gets its sharpness from being too thin, and the bl;ade goes through the scapula and folds, because it is not as durable, then what? I agree that blades need to be sharp, really sharp, but if the durabilty of the blade, and its edge retention is sacrified to make it sharper, then it is defeating its purpose...the ability to be really sharp, and stay really sharp long enough to do what it is supposed to do. If a blade loses its cutting edge going through hide and hair, it really isn't that good of blade, regardless of how sharp it was before.

I believe a bigger reason people can't find animals that have been less than perfectly hit is because they don't have the patience to track them properly, and are too dependant on blood to track, and don't take advantage of the other sign that is left by the fleeing animal. Gut shot animals don't bleed that much, and other clues must be followed. I've had well shot animals that didn't bleed out that much because of the shot angle, or something 'plugging' the hole.

Oh yeah...if I put the shot where I intend to, I really could care less how much it bleeds...that ain't what is killing it.

So yes, sharp blades a good thing. Sharp blades that get their sharpness at the expense of durability and edge retention, a bad idea. Kinda like some of Satellite's heads from the 80s...incredibly sharp, but prone to bad outcomes when shot into an animal...or even if the blades were bumed prior to being shot...
 
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