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Is draw weight proportional to age?

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Seems to me that the older I get the less I like rifle recoil and high poundage bows. Anyone else notice that?
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I think Ted Nugent had it right a long time ago. When you shoot a lower weight you enjoy it more, and you practice more, and that results in being a better shot. A side benefit is it's easier on your shoulders, and more people get into and remain in the sport.

For 90% of the activities related to archery, from 3d competition to taking down a mountainside of animals hunting, you don't need more than 60#, and 50# gets it done pretty well for many game.

So if your form or practice suffers, I'd say lower the weight, and if it doesn't, enjoy what you prefer. It's an individual thing, and age doesn't have anything to do with it.
 

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2007 Bowtech Equalizer, 2009 Hoyt Alphamax 32
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I recently reduced my draw weight from 58# to 50# at age 66. Much more pleasant to shoot. Hunting in cold weather and the draw was a struggle. Reducing the draw weight allows me to practice longer and work on my form. It also makes for a smoother draw when hunting deer.
 

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Everyone’s different. I started shooting when I was 16 at 67#. Today I’m 58 and shoot 67#. It’s easy and comfortable for me. This even after a rotator cuff repair. But I wouldn’t hesitate to lower my DW if it ever gets uncomfortable.
 

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You also have guys who just aren't capable to draw heavy weight so they attempt to make fun of the guys who can.
I've always been fairly strong for my size. I was a power lifter in high school and framed houses most of my life. I'm 45 now and still shoot 75lbs. It's not hard for me to draw I can sit flat on my butt and draw. I still go to the gym to work out. I look at staying in shape as part of my hunting prep. Everyone is different. I get the attempt at humor by some here . But the bottom line is your only trying to make yourself feel better.
 

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Seems to me that the older I get the less I like rifle recoil and high poundage bows. Anyone else notice that?
Happy Thanksgiving
I am 69. Guns, kick does not bother me if very infrequent like a deer rifle. Shooting trap, if 12 gauge, I want gas operated action to reduce recoil. But then you shoot 50 rounds. Bow, the progression as a kid weight went up as I grew, of course. Shot 60# a few years. Thought I needed 70, hurt myself. Recovered back to 60, until I was 64 and went to 50. Comfy for me still and more than enough to kill a whitetail. But not every person has the same body type. After all there are people who can shoot a hundred pounds of more and not get hurt. Not many but some.
 

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Crossbows have negated the need for worry about draw weight. You just have to convince yourself to shoot one
Lol I started worth a crossbow and found it was no challenge and way to easy...I never found much need nor joy in practicing with it so my son and I got bows... Way more fun. The crossbow hasn't been taken out of it's case in 2 years. If I hadn't gotten vertical bows I would have stuck with guns for hunting.
 

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Crossbows have negated the need for worry about draw weight. You just have to convince yourself to shoot one
Perhaps in your case & your state. In the State I reside in Archery hunting means hunting with a vertical bow that will not allow a mechanical means of maintaining the bow in a drawn condition. Exceptions are allowed for those deemed disabled.
 

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Yes, draw weight is proportional to age.

When I was a lot younger I drew twice my age. A bit further on I drew my age. Very soon I'll be drawing half my age.

Automan
 

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Boys were shooting old Stevens 410 today along with my old hawker 50 cal, I joined in, shooting my A5 chambered in 3 1/2 Nitro turkey loads, love that gun...
 

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Athens Vista 33, 35, Axcel sights, Hamskea rests
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I can draw any poundage I want. I have no shoulder issues or strength issues. I'd guess I shoot 300 arrows/week on average. I choose to shoot 60 pound bows. They do everything I want and are more comfortable than 70 pounds. I switched about 5 years ago after hearing about everyone's shoulder issues.
 

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I dropped down after injuring my shoulders, never went back to 70#. Something people seem to forget is that once you tear the parts of the shoulder joint, they never "heal" in the truest since of the word. A 50% tear will be still be 50% torn the day you die. As such it will never support as much load without further tearing, regardless of what kind of shape your muscles are in.
 

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Mathews Atlas, Easton carbon arrows, Iron Will broad heads
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I Think it’s more of an issue of recognizing or accepting that you don’t need a 300 win mag or a 70 pound pull bow to kill a deer.
 

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*inversely proportional. I kind of think poundage is a weird metric anyways. When shopping for my latest bow, 1 bow had 50 or 55lb limbs. The other had 70. Same brand, same model. Both rated at the same speed. I also have a 10 year old bow set to the same draw weight as my newer one. They are shooting around 80 fps different with the same arrows. Kinetic energy is what we should be comparing and talking about rather than poundage. Except in this conversation where the poundage is what you're body "feels". I say all that to say that I think bow technology has increased as well. A newer, lower draw weight bow can be just as good or better than the higher draw weight bow you were shooting when you were younger.
 
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