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I am curious on ACC shafts is there a stiff side of the arrow? The reason I asked this is that I shoot Grizzly Sticks and they have a definite stiff side. I have looked on the Easton website and could find nothing on the subject.
 

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From the years I spend shooting ACC's I don't recall seeing a specific stiff side...some had to be nock tuned a little to group with the rest of them but that was the case with Redlines and Lightspeeds as well so nothing new there. Most of the time I would just fletch all of them with a specific part of the label facing up so that they were all the same (but the labels aren't alligned with anything on easton shafts) more for asthetics i guess.
 

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I don't know about a stiff side, but they have a heavy side. I used to float them when that's what I shot.
 

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They shouldn't have a stiff side, that usually only shows-up on cheap carbon shafts.

-Grant
 

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They shouldn't have a stiff side, that usually only shows-up on cheap carbon shafts.

-Grant
Agreed. I shoot with a group of friends. Between us we have every A/C arrow and there's no stiff side (neither lengthwise or widthwise) on any of them. However, eventually some get bent and that might be what you're referring to?
 

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Agreed. I shoot with a group of friends. Between us we have every A/C arrow and there's no stiff side (neither lengthwise or widthwise) on any of them. However, eventually some get bent and that might be what you're referring to?
I was referencing is that some cheaper carbon shafts do not have very good radial spine, as in it is different as you rotate the arrow. This has mostly been solved with wrapped shafts.
The ACC should have some of the best radial spine consistency because they are carbon wrapped around an extruded aluminum core, extruded aluminum is still the most consistent arrow material available; it just doesn't hold its characteristics very well over time.

-Grant
 

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I've tested the spine of several dozen ACCs with a good spine tester at numerous angles and never found a stiff side. They also hold the weight specs given by Easton. Super shaft.
 

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However, eventually some get bent and that might be what you're referring to?
carbon arrows do not bend. they're either as they left the factory or broken.

the moral of the story is to to use cheap arrows with wide manufacturing tolerances.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks

Thank you for all of the input. My spine tester isn't the greatest and just needed to know if I needed to spend a lot of time with spine.
 

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I don't know about a stiff side, but they have a heavy side. I used to float them when that's what I shot.
I have floated them with results same as you reported. I did not do any bare shaft or static spine measurements. I, as you did (if I am understanding your note) indexed the nocks along the heavy side simply to insure the arrows were assembled the same as possible, given what I had reasonable control over.
Since I was and continue to be the largest component of controllable variation I decided that my time would be better spent working on improving that area.
 

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Sorry to bring this up, but I still struggle to understand why someone would think that the stiff side is always the same spine as the next arrow with a stiff side. The spine is important. You may have one arrow with a stiff side that the spine is equal to another arrow with the weak side of the other arrow. Thus, it is better to tune by moving your nocks per arrow. You should still float the shafts and mark the heavy side for at least a starting point, then shoot the arrows for grouping and continue to move the nock around until the arrows group good. Each arrow is independent of the other, thus should be treated separately.

One final comment. If you have a heavy side it means that there is an overlap of material thus creating a stiffer section. How much is dependent on the overlap.
 

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the moral of the story is to to use cheap arrows with wide manufacturing tolerances.
wow, what a typo. can't edit the post anymore either. :(

the moral of the story is NOT to to use cheap arrows with wide manufacturing tolerances.
 
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