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Discussion Starter #1
Without going into detail, the plan would be to shoot indoors and outdoors with appropriate equipment for both.

Is it plausible to use...

1 riser/plunger/rest/string
1 sight
1 stabilizer setup

2 sets of limbs
2 sets of arrows

?

It makes sense in my head, but is there any reason I'm not thinking of that this wouldn't work?
 

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I shoot indoors and out with one set up, i just use older arrows.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't mind buying some things twice if it means not making any concessions like using skinny arrows indoors or vice versa.
 

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brandon -

Technically sure and you could even use the exact same rig for indoors and outdoors, depending on your level of shooting and expectations.

My thinking the last few years was along the same lines for the outdoor season:
1 riser
1 pair of limbs
1 sight
2 apertures (and carriers - easy with Sure-locs)
2 strings
2 plungers
2 sets of arrows

I don't like the idea of two sets of limbs for indoor/outdoor during season.
Regardless of what you think the feel will be different.

Viper1 out.
 

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This is actually how several people in our local club (myself included) do it, with some slight variations. (very similar to Viper1 above)

In general:
1 riser
1 set of limbs
1 sight
2 sets of arrows
2 strings
1 Beiter plunger or 2 Shibuya Dx plungers

Me personally:
I use heavy aluminum arrows with long feathers for line cutting in indoor (Easton Plat+), and skinny arrows with spin wings for outdoor (CX Medallion Pro).
I do use the same riser, limbs, plunger, and rest, but some in our club have lighter limbs for indoor so they control it better when not needing the additional arrow speed.

The only additional thing I have is separate strings for indoor and out. The two sets of arrows are different thickness and use different nocks so they require my tied on nocking points to be at slightly different heights. The strings are identical otherwise, so if needed the tie in knock can be redone and the alternate string can be used as a backup.

I would say that if you want to do this with one plunger, it would be best if it was a Beiter or something that can be quickly readjusted to a known value. Otherwise I would have two plungers, one tuned correctly for each set of arrows. (2x Shibuya Dx is still cheaper than a Beiter, but Beiters are the top of the line . . .)
 

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I think the answer to that depends on where you shoot.

You may enter an event where your competition has a backup bow ready to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What poundage limbs are you guys using then if only 1 pair?
 

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b -

What poundage limbs are you guys using then if only 1 pair?
Bad question. What we're using has no bearing on what you should be using.
The outdoor venues typically require more arrows and a higher degree of precision, so that determines the optimal weight.

Viper1 out.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My only experience switching from indoors to outdoors was when I was on my college archery team (10 years ago?). We switched from 30# limbs indoor to 40# for outdoor (read: they took back the one set they gave us, and handed out different ones).

Also note: I'm not claiming to have any appreciable experience factor here.
 

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b -

Humm, your archery "coach" gave you a 10# jump???

I've had plenty of students (adults) do quite well at 70M with good bows in the 30# range, and appropriate arrows of course.

Without knowing your current experience, I would suggest you start indoors (reasonable for PA this time of year) and on your first outdoor session use your indoor rig and see what happens. That's what I did years (OK, a lot of years) ago, and was pretty pleasantly surprised.

Viper1 out.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Cool....good advice, thank you.

I was going to get everything together for indoor right now and then reevaluate later on for outdoor anyway.

From my above experience I just assumed the higher poundage limbs were needed to go outside.
 

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I used to swap arrows, plunger and string for indoors but after several seasons changing back and forth i've found that what works well for one usually applies to both.
I don't see shooting skinny arrows indoors a concession, I've found the scores to be as near as identical as makes no difference, my only concern is the number of nock strikes and shaft damage indoors.

I try to shoot the same poundage throughout the year changing only to tune arrows or change form.
 

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toj -

Arrow on arrow violence is a very real problem indoors, unless you're using multi spot targets and probably the biggest reason I use aluminum indoors and carbon or composites outdoors. However, I know a lot of really good shooters who favor ACEs and X10s indoors - I'm too cheap for that...

Viper1 out.
 

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I try to pick up the remains of other archers outdoor sets, we only shoot in three arrow ends indoors so sets of five or six are really cheap even x10s.
I also have a short draw so i can buy from pretty much everyone.
 

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It is realistic plan. But after using thin X10's for outdoors and thick X7's I struggled with varying thickness of the arrows versus each plunger, different rest adjustments (I used hoyt supers, and various wire magnetic flippers), and encountered different clearance issues. Time is something I have less off so to save the trouble I have two different sets of everything for indoor and outdoor.
 

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I use carbons outside for 70m, aluminum shorter than 50/inside, one riser with AL, one riser with C, separate strings, same set(s) of limbs for both risers, same sight. You could in theory drop down to one riser but then the rest needs to move each time the arrow sizes change, etc. I have separate plungers but in theory you could adjust that each season, change the settings from outdoor to intoor. I have been considering getting separate sights -- LAS has a certain desirable sight on sale -- but in theory each season you can re-adjust it to the different setup.

In theory you could use one setup all the time with ACs or carbons inside. You could also have basically everything but the rest position (and maybe string or nocks) the same and use all the same stuff with two different arrows. My thing was when I tried that and had a mixed indoor and outdoor schedule simultaneously, adjustments started getting missed and I snapped a rest in practice unwittingly shooting skinny arrows on fat settings that submarined the plunger. It works better if the seasons are separate. Mine weren't and that's when I put the second bow into action for outdoors. I then found I preferred the second bow for 70m and have left the situation as-is. If I ever build up some draw weight and like how the first bow shoots 70m, I might consider warily mixing and matching again, but it's a pain. [In Texas we can shoot outdoors in the winter....]
 

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A -

Arrow diameters aren't that big a deal. On a "real" adjustable rest, like most of the AAEs, changing the height isn't that hard or you could just find a compromise between the two. I've done both and came to the conclusion being slightly off center on the plunger really didn't cost me anything.

Viper1 out.
 
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