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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am new to traditional archery, just got a martin savanah longbow. Of all the arrows I have tried the 2016 seem to shoot the best, with my limited abilities. Is this a heavy enough arrow to hunt with. the bow is 55 lbs @ 28, my arrows are cut at 30" with 100 grain tip.I'm drawing about 28 1/2 inches.
 

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The arrow is perfect spine wise for that weight and draw.
 

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sound -

Considering that the 2016 is a pretty standard arrow for a #55 bow, I'd say yes. The only monkey wrench is the 30" length, might make it a little weak (spine), but the 100 gr tip probably compensates. If you KNOW it's tuned correctly - you're fine. Don't fall into the heavier is better crap. A well tuned, well placed arrow will always be more efficient than shooting a log, just for the sake of "extra weight".

Viper1 out.
 

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I don't think the 2016 will be weak in a longbow, a 30 inch might be in a 'curve though.

Sounds like a good set-up.:thumbs_up
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks guys! compounds are my thing, but this longbow is soooo different. A local shop, where the archery guy is a traditional shooter says it has to be 2117 the heavier the better, I just figured whatever shoots better is what I should shoot.
 

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He's probably using the Easton charts, which are garbage when it comes to traditional bows. Your results are the ultimate decider, and you should be doing well with those I reckon.
 

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I like using "logs"! I like to make my arrows with heavy ramon or oak dowels 32 to 34 inches long with Grizzly broadheads (spine tuned by arrow length). Yeah this setup is best for under twenty yards but talk about quiet. The arrow leaves the bow with almost no sound and hits so dang hard. To each his own I guess but I think that the light arrows are best with the pully bows that can best take advantage of quick limbs.

Bob
 

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If you measure the efficiency of bows, the heavier arrows, in any bow, pulleyed or pulleyless, will get the most return on your investmet of pulling the string back. But with some of these newer traditional bows using better laminates, better string materials, better geometry, they are pushing the lighter arrows with more efficiency.

I was shooting 2016s for a long time out of my 45# Quinn until I tried bareshafting and I found out they were way weak. That bow, with my draw length likes a spine of about .500" or so. That's just the characteristics of that bow. I sold those 2016s to my friend who shoots a Bear Grizzly that's 43# and they work great for him. I ended up shooting Beman ICS 500s weighing 380 grains at 190fps. I know people who've had pass-tru shots on deer with the same setup. Recently I switched to using 390gr. CE Thunderstorm SEs becuase they're cheap and I can loose them in the woods shooting at squirrels and stuff and not break the bank. Speaking of which, I should get off my kiester and make these flu-flus.

Both heavy and light arrows have their strengths and shortcommings. Find what works best for you, your setup, and what you're trying to do with it. Then drink more beer. :darkbeer:
 

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... and the light arrows work very well in most recurves. Some of my arrows lately have been so heavy I don't know if I should shoot them or throw them. I had to make a quick "barn arrow" this afternoon and didn't have time for anything fancy so I used a bare full length 36" x 3/8" oak shaft with six fletch (tri-fletcher x 2), judo point. Ugly but shot well, but no critters tonight.

beer would be good, could you bring some over?

Bob
 

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What kind of oak are you using? I've never heard of anyone using oak. I'm thinking white oak would work pretty well.
 

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I really don't know, just says oak on them. I just "feel" for the spine I want. Fairly straight too. Went through about 40 dowels found 10. The only problem is you have to spend time trimming length to tune and the arrows are not all that matched but great for critters. I like to use oak or ramon wood for my heavier arrow/broadhead combo's too. I use cedar also but they are expensive and have to order them. When Bass Pro came to Atlanta, they put out of business all the small Trad Archery shops. Mostly Bass Pro sells pully bow items. I have found cedar there but have to re-fletch which is more work than building my own.

I have some poke salad berries growing out back, I'm going to concentrate the pigments and use that to stain the oak shafts. I picked up some red barred fletching to match to purple shafts post staining.

Bob
 

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Soundman - the 2016 is a renowned hunting shaft. Personally I'd trim them shorter and go to at least a 125 grain head, adding a little more weight, but that's just me.
 

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I agree with Talon. A shorter arrow with a 145 grain Magnus II screw in would be bad medicine for alot of animals in the right hands....
 
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