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I am a newbie archer. I've always loved target sports and sports where you compete against yourself, so archery is a great fit. Recently I received permission to hunt on a 10 acre suburban property, so I've made the dive. For about a month I've been outfitting and learning and thought that I'd share some of the experiences I've had with others.
I'll start at the beginning.
Trying to find a good pro shop.
The first one I found was geographically perfect. Within 20 minutes of my home - on the same route I take to visit my girlfriend.
I called to check if they were open and told the owner I was coming by that night. This is exciting! I went for a visit with money in my pocket.
When I arrived, the outside looked exactly like I imagined. A log cabin in the woods with signs from new and old bow companies. A cartoonishly giant target.
Practically an old west provisions store.
It had a different energy inside. Dirty would be the first word that comes to mind. I don't mean disorganized - it was that too. I mean dirty.
I looked around for a bit. Not too many bows on the wall and accessories were generally in piles.
The owner was deep in conversation with another customer. It was about politics.
I don't need big box store bright lights and clam shell packages lined up nicely, but this was not really what I was expecting. I was not just in the market for a bow, but also a mentor. Someone I could trust to give me good advice about equipment, form and local hunting opportunities.
I met the owner when he finally acknowledged me. The conversation was short. "Give me $500, and I'll set you up with everything you need."
Eh, no.
I resolved I may have to figure archery out myself. Fortunately I have youtube, podcasts, and archerytalk.

Tune in tomorrow to find out what bow I bought, what my trip to another pro shop was like, and which tool I built first.
Shoot straight!
-KEG
 

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Isaiah 6:8
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yeah i definitely wouldn't go to that first one again! I've been aggravated with one i have been going to because the tech acts like i am a bother to him because i need help, found a different one and he has helped me so much better and takes time with me to teach me things
 

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This is the very reason I bought all my own stuff and learned how to work on my own bows. People wonder why nobody wants to buy local anymore.

Sent from my SM-N970U using Tapatalk
 

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Back Yard Champion
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About 2 years into working at this small shop I became manager. More like, chief cook and bottle washer. Mopped the floor, swept, cleaned windows, rest room, you name it. All hung and displayed as should be. This was a small shop. Towards the end there was but maybe 5 or 6 bows hanging - those went to another bow shop to be sold.

I ended up buying most the archery tools, jigs, bow vice, arrow saw and most all the vanes. The like new bow press was out of date when the owner bought it - didn't buy it.
 

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I drive 45 minutes each way to my shop and know others that drive 3+ hours each way to get their work done at the same shop. Good people and good work are worth the time.
 

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allot of shops around like that. because archery is such a little known sport, allot shop owners think what they know is the only thing worth knowing and are opinionated about it. they have specific brands they like and push them hard, or brands that they get good pricing on and push them for the profit. i've been in the sport for 49 years and don't rely much on shops for anything,... having accumulated more tools and equipment than i can shake a stick at. best thing you can do is make a mission out of learning all that you can about tuning, shooting, tools for bows and equipment and stay away from the "pro" shops.
 

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In my limited experience, a good pro shop and a good mentor are your best bets for cutting the learning curve in half and reaching your potential. They're out there. Keep looking.
 

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I like elk!
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I drive 45 minutes each way to my shop and know others that drive 3+ hours each way to get their work done at the same shop. Good people and good work are worth the time.
That’s insane...
Why wouldn’t someone just buy a press?
Tuning and wrenching on a bow is so easy.
 

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That DVD set+youtube tutorials from folks like John Dudley+your own press and draw board setup+a few tools = happiness and self-sufficiency.

Username nuts&bolts on here can make you feel bad about your form and how to improve it if you need accuracy help, or take some lessons.
 

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Try to go to a couple of shops and take some lessons, that way you can find someone you click with, and you DO need lessons if you want to get good fast and avoid bad habits. Find your EXACT draw length and how many pounds you can pull EASILY. Try out a lot of bows before you buy. A bow requires proper set-up and maintenance, who will provide this service? Personally, I bought a press and draw board so I can do my own work and get it done when I need it. Good luck
 

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Elite Kure
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allot of shops around like that. because archery is such a little known sport, allot shop owners think what they know is the only thing worth knowing and are opinionated about it. they have specific brands they like and push them hard, or brands that they get good pricing on and push them for the profit. i've been in the sport for 49 years and don't rely much on shops for anything,... having accumulated more tools and equipment than i can shake a stick at. best thing you can do is make a mission out of learning all that you can about tuning, shooting, tools for bows and equipment and stay away from the "pro" shops.
the only real archery shop near me (not including places id say that are mainly sales, i.e. no real range) is just like that. Its all mathews, rage, blazers, and minimal bow tuning.
 

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I've been thinking about going all in myself but still lack confidence also there's a sizable investment in tools. I have been working up my own arrows for sometime now I bought a ram,arrow saw and fletching jig. I just need to just take the step and do it.
 

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I am a newbie archer. I've always loved target sports and sports where you compete against yourself, so archery is a great fit. Recently I received permission to hunt on a 10 acre suburban property, so I've made the dive. For about a month I've been outfitting and learning and thought that I'd share some of the experiences I've had with others.
I'll start at the beginning.
Trying to find a good pro shop.
The first one I found was geographically perfect. Within 20 minutes of my home - on the same route I take to visit my girlfriend.
I called to check if they were open and told the owner I was coming by that night. This is exciting! I went for a visit with money in my pocket.
When I arrived, the outside looked exactly like I imagined. A log cabin in the woods with signs from new and old bow companies. A cartoonishly giant target.
Practically an old west provisions store.
It had a different energy inside. Dirty would be the first word that comes to mind. I don't mean disorganized - it was that too. I mean dirty.
I looked around for a bit. Not too many bows on the wall and accessories were generally in piles.
The owner was deep in conversation with another customer. It was about politics.
I don't need big box store bright lights and clam shell packages lined up nicely, but this was not really what I was expecting. I was not just in the market for a bow, but also a mentor. Someone I could trust to give me good advice about equipment, form and local hunting opportunities.
I met the owner when he finally acknowledged me. The conversation was short. "Give me $500, and I'll set you up with everything you need."
Eh, no.
I resolved I may have to figure archery out myself. Fortunately I have youtube, podcasts, and archerytalk.

Tune in tomorrow to find out what bow I bought, what my trip to another pro shop was like, and which tool I built first.
Shoot straight!
-KEG
By my third year in archery, the 2 good shops near me were out of business. That was over 30 years ago. After that, I had so many negative shop experiences that I decided to go 100% DIY. I'll never regret it. I'm sure there are good shops and good techs, but it's a very hard business to survive in to begin with. It's not high-paying, so there's a lot of employee turnover with techs. Shops have to hire who they can get, and their training and knowledge curves are highly variable. Right now, I don't know a single shop, near me, I'd trust to put on a new string set, much less set up my bow properly. Many shops focus much more on sales than customer service.
 

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Mathews Traverse
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I've been thinking about going all in myself but still lack confidence also there's a sizable investment in tools. I have been working up my own arrows for sometime now I bought a ram,arrow saw and fletching jig. I just need to just take the step and do it.
Just do it. I was the same way. Very apprehensive about a press until i said [email protected] it. Things are much easier than they look. I have a fantastic shop to go to amd have become goods friends with them but there's nothing like doing you own work and tuning.
 

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That’s insane...
Why wouldn’t someone just buy a press?
Tuning and wrenching on a bow is so easy.
Good service/people is worth it. Two years ago these guys flew from out of state and blew a bow up while practice shooting for their guided hunt. The shop loaned and setup a flagship model for their hunt free of charge.
 
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