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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Interesting weekend. My parents arrived from NC a few days ago to stay and visit through Thanksgiving. I live in a tiny community near the dam my company is rebuilding, out in the middle of the Gila Wilderness. Saturday night my mom is taking their old labrador out to pee one last time and all hell breaks loose. She starts yelling at the dog to come back, then it turned to a deathly shreking from there on out. Meanwhile I was trying to light a fire in the wood stove, and I knew exactly what was going on outside. So I run into my bedroom to grab my .380 from the sock drawer, not there (I left it in the safe from the last time I was out of town), and decide the next best thing to grab is the hatchet I was just holding by the wood stove. Since then my dad has run outside to try and save their old dog from being completely tore up by the little beasts, and my english bulldog is bolting out with my fiance to see what is going on. So now my entire family is in the front yard screaming at the dogs, the javelina, and just screaming in general. I run out the door and go straight for my bulldog standing in the middle of at least 10 javelina. Thought for sure he was going to get beat up pretty bad, but I saw him running around through the pigs (yes I know they aren't pigs) and at least holding his own for the time being. Just the Friday before another of my neighbors was hiking around the lake with his dog and ran into me at work. He had some kind of chow mix with a huge hole in her lips and about five deep puncture wounds around the neck and body, obviously the result of a pretty good scuffle with javelina. Anyway, I run out into the herd of pigs to grab my dog yelling and flailing to scare them away like I have done so many times in the past, and one of the little *******s stopped and stood me up! At first I was a little intimidated and took a few swings at his face with my hatchet, but he just backed up a couple feet and mostly stood his ground. Then he decided to charge and that's when I gave him a good backswing with the hammer part of my hatchet upside his nose. He flopped over, got up, and took off with the rest of the pack closely behind. I start looking around to access the damage and my dog is still running around and seems ok, my parents old lab is on the porch with my mom and fiance, seems ok. Then I see my dad holding the inside of his leg, his pants are ripped, and their is some blood, but at least it's not gushing out.

We all get inside and surprisingly the lab is completely calm and appears unharmed. Later I find a 3" torn puncture wound in her gut (that's what they do, get a dog on their side or back and just rip them open), but thankfully not much blood and the stomach looking at me was unharmed. Whew, could have been so much worse! Knew she needed stitches for sure, but she would be fine for now. My mom is completely freaking out during all of this, I thought her having a heart attack was our biggest concern. We can see blood coming through my dads jeans and knew he got tagged good at least once. The problem is where he got hit is right in the femoral artery region, but again we didn't see squirting blood so he was pretty sure it wasn't too serious. Finally got this pants off and see two deep puncture wounds on his inner thigh pouring out a decent amount of blood and it's already bruised pretty good. Another three inches up the leg and the family jewels would have been in serious jeopardy! Start to talk over the situation with my dad and he is convinced it's just a scratch. To be honest I was pretty sure he would be ok, but if it was my leg I would have been in the car already (town is an hour away). So we grab some towels and start putting pressure on the wounds to see what happens. I decide to take the dog down to the vet that lives a few miles up the road and get her stitched up real quick. While I go down to the office to make the phone call, I told them to figure out what we are doing with dad and that he should just come with us and go straight to the hospital. Get back and he is still being super stubborn, so I told him to hang tight until I get back from the vet, and if things take a turn for the worse they should just take off.

To make a long story short, I get back from the vet (dog is fine four stitches in the gut and some antibiotics) and my parents loading up into their car and heading for town. Dad noticed some swelling and thought he might have nicked a major artery and was bleeding internally, so finally off to the ER. All said and done, four puncture wounds on his inner thigh (none hit an artery thankfully) and some major bruising. These critters are only 60 lbs, but they are strong and tough! Typically they get a tusk under the skin and just start pulling, had they done that on his leg and femoral artery I'm quite sure dad would have been toast. In the end I have two pretty sore family members both on pain killers and antibiotics, but we survived!

They came back twice that night while I was at the vet, and another solo hog the day after when I was in town picking up prescriptions. The Hoyt is on standby still waiting for revenge!
 

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Old Yeller' details the attack for a Javalina group that amazingly real. They are very aggressive when cornered or defending their piglets.

Best of luck and good shootin'.
 

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If I get a tag next year, can I come stay with you? :)
 

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First of all, I'm glad your dog is ok and your dad not seriously injured. However, I've been in the middle of javelina packs many times. When they get in a "panic" they run around and snort and since they can't see well, if they feel "cornered", they will raise the hair on their backs up and rapidly pop their tusks together as an attempt to intimidate the threat. However, I've never felt truly threatened by them, unless they are really cornered, they will eventually turn and run. You don't try to bite them, they won't try to bite you. Dogs, however, don't understand that; hence, the injuries you describe and since you and your dad were in the middle of the javeline-dog fray, all bets were off.

FYI, this does not necessarily apply to big, lone, rutting wild hog boars or sows with piglets, Some of these just have a bad attitude, period!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My company has a contract with NM Game and Fish, so obviously I talk with those guys on a regular basis. Can't wait to ask them if it's open season at my house after the attack. I know the entire Gila, plus a major portion of Grant county, only has one game warden which I know personally. Not to mention everyone in town has problems with the little demons and will not say a peep if a few go down. I'm hoping after I kill one they just stay away.
 

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Man, that a "hair raising story". Glad everyone is basically ok, Ive hunten them a couple times, they can be viscous little buggers when in a frenzy.

I hear Tregger is having a black friday sale in BBQ's.........just sayin... ;-)

Had a mt lion try cornering / cutting in on my pooch a few years back. Long story short, result was a dead cougar. Shot it at 18' off my back porch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
First of all, I'm glad your dog is ok and your dad not seriously injured. However, I've been in the middle of javelina packs many times. When they get in a "panic" they run around and snort and since they can't see well, if they feel "cornered", they will raise the hair on their backs up and rapidly pop their tusks together as an attempt to intimidate the threat. However, I've never felt truly threatened by them, unless they are really cornered, they will eventually turn and run. You don't try to bite them, they won't try to bite you. Dogs, however, don't understand that; hence, the injuries you describe and since you and your dad were in the middle of the javeline-dog fray, all bets were off.

FYI, this does not necessarily apply to big, lone, rutting wild hog boars or sows with piglets, Some of these just have a bad attitude, period!
I completely agree, every other time I have been in contact with them which is frequently, they are very docile and for the most part run from me. Just like you said, they got all worked up with the situation and were simply in defensive mode. However I'll be damned if I was going to let them kill my parents dog or mine, and my dad paid the price for it too. All I really want to accomplish is to keep them out of my yard, but a few of the neighbors feed the deer, and subsequently the hogs, so we'll see how it goes. When I go outside at night I'm always very cautious of them and other things lurking around such as cougars. My mom however didn't look and that is what started this whole mess.
 

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I have hunted those mean little *******s a lot over there past 30 years. All over the state. Had many of them charge me. They are crazy. Can't see hardly at all and when they spook they will come at you. I'll be down in the Gila with my son soon to hunt them. Can't wait.
 

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You may notice from my screen name that I have a pre-disposition to these little fellows. I've spent a good deal of time with them in the brush of S. Texas. I just love them. They are the perfect quarry for bowhunters. They can't see worth a durn, and their hearing is nothing to brag about. They do have a good nose, though, with the way they smell, they probably wish they didn't. Probably the ideal walk-n-stalk critter. Just stay downwind and you'll do OK.

The best part is that they are fantastic table fare. Beautiful, lean, white meat that is tender and tasty. Chile, tamales, enchiladas, whatever.

Their fundamental natural enemy is the Coyote. I don't think they can tell the difference between Coyotes and dogs. I believe that's why this confrontation took place. The humans just complicated the situation. Around camp we put out a little corn in the evenings just so they'll come in as we sit around the fire. As long as we're still and relatively quiet they come right into the yard and poke around. Never yet seen one act in any threatening way.

In Texas it's a bag limit of 2 per year. Honor system -- no tags required. I doubt anyone cheats.

If you get a chance to stick one, don't pass it up. Best meat you'll ever get. Lots of folks shoot them and let them lay. What a waste. All the smell comes from a small gland on the back just forward of the tail that looks for all the world like a small nipple. Once the skin's off the smell is gone.
 

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Reading that link and the hunting regs, it sounds like all you're allowed to use is an ammonia filled squirt gun unless you specifically have a permit and then you can't actually shoot one if you're within 1/4 mile of an occupied building. Pathetic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Just got an update from the General Store and another dog, a boxer, got hit last night and messed up pretty bad. Seems they are making the rounds around town!

I really hope killing one does the trick, but it sounds like we're in for a war
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You may notice from my screen name that I have a pre-disposition to these little fellows. I've spent a good deal of time with them in the brush of S. Texas. I just love them. They are the perfect quarry for bowhunters. They can't see worth a durn, and their hearing is nothing to brag about. They do have a good nose, though, with the way they smell, they probably wish they didn't. Probably the ideal walk-n-stalk critter. Just stay downwind and you'll do OK.

The best part is that they are fantastic table fare. Beautiful, lean, white meat that is tender and tasty. Chile, tamales, enchiladas, whatever.

Their fundamental natural enemy is the Coyote. I don't think they can tell the difference between Coyotes and dogs. I believe that's why this confrontation took place. The humans just complicated the situation. Around camp we put out a little corn in the evenings just so they'll come in as we sit around the fire. As long as we're still and relatively quiet they come right into the yard and poke around. Never yet seen one act in any threatening way.

In Texas it's a bag limit of 2 per year. Honor system -- no tags required. I doubt anyone cheats.

If you get a chance to stick one, don't pass it up. Best meat you'll ever get. Lots of folks shoot them and let them lay. What a waste. All the smell comes from a small gland on the back just forward of the tail that looks for all the world like a small nipple. Once the skin's off the smell is gone.
how do you prepare them? I have heard mixed reviews on them being edible, and since I will likely have the opportunity to find out here soon I was wonder the best ways to prepare them.
 

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Just got an update from the General Store and another dog, a boxer, got hit last night and messed up pretty bad. Seems they are making the rounds around town!

I really hope killing one does the trick, but it sounds like we're in for a war
Does NM have a "stand your ground" law?

I don't care what the biologist say, these things are just another type of hog. If there's something for them to eat, they will be there. I've got to believe that if there were no food source they would be elsewhere.

Might be hard to re-train all of Silver City.

I did check the TX Dept. of Wildlife and their guidelines were just like the ones from AZ.

Best of luck to you.
 
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Does NM have a "stand your ground" law?

I don't care what the biologist say, these things are just another type of hog. If there's something for them to eat, they will be there. I've got to believe that if there were no food source they would be elsewhere.

Might be hard to re-train all of Silver City.

I did check the TX Dept. of Wildlife and their guidelines were just like the ones from AZ.

Best of luck to you.
The javelina/peccary is actually a member of the suina....an offshoot of the pig family. This particular "pig" is called a collared peccary and usually is found in groups. They are omnivorous so they really do not seek out meat to eat. They will defend themselves if they feel threatened and the dog threatened them. They have adapted to humans quite well and will frequent neighborhoods looking for plants and other natural foods/forage. Those tusks can/will do some damage...the snapping sound they make when the jaws shut is meant as a deterrent but they will use them to defend themselves. Interesting read. Sounds like someone needs to do a little "culling". Cheers!
Fred
 

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Can javelina carry rabies? Shouldn't they both have been started on rabies vaccinations? Even if a dog has been vaccinated, after an attack they should be given additional vaccinations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Can javelina carry rabies? Shouldn't they both have been started on rabies vaccinations? Even if a dog has been vaccinated, after an attack they should be given additional vaccinations.
They can have rabies, but neither was treated nor was it recommended. My dad got a tetanus shot and various different antibiotics, so if he starts turning into a zombie it might be rabies. Are you thinking that might explain the aggression towards people? I don't think this type of encounter is very uncommon where javelina roam.
 

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There is a large musk gland on top of there back to the back just above there back legs. Get the gland off while skining and do not let it get to the meat. They are not bad eatting at all. Lots of bbq sause and mesquite wood helps at camp.. It is said that they think they are also related to the hippopotamus. They get 20-40lbs. and my biggest one was 43lbs.
 

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I have been in several close encounters with javalina...probably one of my favorite animals to bowhunt because their eye sight is horrible. Have never had one directly come after me. Predator calling when the herd is busted up is always a blast. Just had a few in my yard eating the left over Halloween pumpkins. As far killing one and not having the herd come back is up in the air. I trapped one that was ripping up sod in my dad's yard and the herd never returned. AZGFD also told a resident of a gated community to contact some archers when he started having a pretty bad pig problem. We killed 2 in his yard on the first morning and then a couple of my buddies killed a few more the next 3 days. The javalina showed up same time everyday. If they are getting food close to where you live, I wouldn't count on killing just 1 and hoping they don't return. I would imagine that you would be pretty well justified to light all those little *******s up with a 10-22 if they come back on your property again and start acting violent. On a different note...the only way I can choke down javalina is by making it into summer sausage and chorizo. Any other way I've had it, you know your eating a stinky peccary! I have killed and eaten lots of em. They were made for bowhunters!
 
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