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I’m scheduled for a total knee replacement in late Aug. or Early Sept. My question is…how long will it take to be able to use my climber for archery deer (starts Oct 1. and runs through Nov 14th?.I have a Summit viper (sit and climb that is really easy to use (I always said I thought you could do it with one leg now I may get to try!

Is my season screwed? Will I have to hunt from a ground blind?

What has been your experience with a total knee and bow hunting?

Do you think the Doc will O.K. the climber use?

Thanks all,

MQ
 

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Brother

It took good 6-8wks. Now he could walk on it but climbing I would say your just taking unessary chances. I would purchase some good leafy wear outfit and hunt from the ground in blind or stool. I have had deer walk right up to ne with full leafy wear outfit. Good Luck. They can do some amazing things today with kness and joints.
 

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father

My old man had both knees replaced and he was in his late 50's when he had it done. Time , cant remember for sure, but I know that the docs had him up and working it the following day. :( . He had a faster rehab time than some other knee replacement people he knew because of how hard he worked after the surgery. Tons of exercise. He worked through alot of pain and it helped strengthen the muscles around the knee with moved the progreess along. I would think your hunting season is not over, but like DB said, take it to the ground until your ready.
 

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I am 72 and rehabing from my second total knee replacement. This one was done March 31 and I am still having some difficulty with steps. Your speed of recovery is related to many things with your age being one of the most important factor.

Climbing is not the only problem. During the operation they cut some nerves which may never grow back. These nerves help you know the position of your leg and foot. It will take some time unitl you can walk on rought terrain. At first I tripped walking across a sdmooth lawn.

Bottom line is I am glad I had them replaced and am willing to go thorugh the lengthy rehab. Never had much pain only some difficulty walking since the operation involved some separation of the quads to get the new prosthesis in place.
 

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Good advice so far....I tell my hunting patients that they better learn to hunt from the ground. Its just not worth the trouble you can get into climbing.

I have had some get back into treestands, but it took about a year.

Not worth the risk....get a double bull...:D
 

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I am 22 and had a total knee replacement ( wrestling/football injury) It took me 3 weeks to be able to go turkey hunting agian good enough to walk and squat. As far as that goes you could use a fixed position pretty easy providing you rehab well. hope that helps
 

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I worked with a guy that had parts placed in his knee, not a complete replacement but close. He's able to run and he's in his 70's. Jerry Rice the 49er receiver and now for the Oakland Raiders had the same surgery done and he's also able to run also and continues to play football.

I've got a bum knee also and am in my mid-40's the guy above recommended that I get my knee replaced while I'm still young. I'm going to wait until I can't walk normally and then begin to think about it.
 

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My father had both knees replace several years ago in June and after lots of hard work, I had him climbing a ladderstand that fall. It was awkward to say the least and his mobility diminished some but the constant pain was not near as intense as before the surgery.

I'm headed for a knee replacement sometime in my future and need a partial right now but I'm holding off. At 38, even the best replacement knees last only about 15 to 20yrs of average use and I'd be looking at a possible second replacement.

My wife used to work for an orthopedic supplier who made and sold replacement joints to doctors. As with any mechanical part, there are good ones, mediocre ones and bad ones on the market. Problem is, it's up to your doctor to choose which one to use, and often his choice is based solely on what kind of deal his sales rep made him and what he feels comfortable with in installing and not always on what is the best, longest lasting model for his patient. The patient rarely knows the brand of choice and even if they did, what do you compare it to?

As a patient, you would be well advised to do a lot of your own research before going through with the surgery. The information is available, you just have to look for it and make an educated decision. Believe me, there are bad knees out there and are installed every day.
 
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