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Urban Archery
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do people think of this Lifetime warranty that has popped up in the last 10 years or so. Personally I'm not a fan. Hoyt, for example, use to offer a warrently where you were covered for the first year, then after that you paid a percentage of the price. For example if the bow broke after 2 years I paid 10% and got the replacement. While that seems bad comparred to lifetime, look at it this way.
If I buy a UltraTec for example. Feels fine in the shop but after 3 months I find I just can't hit anything with it. I decide to sell it and buy a ProTec. I try to sell the as new bow to someone else and they won't buy because it's not covered. I'm stuck with a bow I don't shoot well with because no one will take it without warranty. However if I was able to resell with warranty (just like in the computer industry) then I would be able to buy a new bow. Hoyt still get their money, I'm a happier customer, and someone else is now shooting a Hoyt bow for a cheaper price. Surely that's an all win situation.


(BTW not picking on Hoyt, just an example company name)
 

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Ahhh.."Limited" Lifetime Warranty...

;)

"However if I was able to resell with warranty (just like in the computer industry) then I would be able to buy a new bow."

You have said that before Marcus, and it isn't true. Warranties for the majority of computer equipment (and most everything else) are not transferable, they are limited by time, use and to the original owner...

"I try to sell the as new bow to someone else and they won't buy because it's not covered."

That's life in the fast lane...

;)

-CG
 

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I have owned several of most every bow manufacturers bows in my time. And have experienced a failure of one kind or another with a few. In every case, I got the needed parts, from limbs to risers, and never once was asked for a warranty card. I don`t know for a fact, but I don`t think they monitor that stuff to close.

I hope not, I already have 4 new hoyts this year and # 5 is on the way. I have yet to register, or whatever it is you do with them.
 

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Urban Archery
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You have said that before Marcus, and it isn't true. Warranties for the majority of computer equipment (and most everything else) are not transferable, they are limited by time, use and to the original owner...
I think you are buying the wrong computers. I have managed computer service centres and handled all the warranty claims for one of the largest Apple resellers in Australia, warranty was 1 year, transferrable, same goes with the PC maker I deal with now. Perhaps if that is not the case overseas it's a local legal requirement.
 

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Marcus;

I would have to dig up the warranty card for the last I-MAC I bought, but I suspect it is non-transferable as well. I think you are confusing with a minority of equipment in a specific country - with what happens with the majority of equipment everywhere else. In which case it is hard to use it as a meaningful example...

;)

-CG
 

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Urban Archery
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not really. It's a reasonable system in my book. We were trained my Apple Australia using the information supplied by Apple US (Apple Australia have about 3 original thoughts every 10 years) so I'm pretty sure that the warranty is tied to the serial number, and not the owner. In fact when we did a claim we analysed the serial number which would be in the form of
SG132XXXXXXXXX
the SG was the location of production, the 1 was the year of manufacture (in this case 2001) and the 32 was the week of the year built. If that number was outside a year we then required POP. If it was inside a year we were instructed to process it as warranty.

Anyway, doesn't matter. Would you prefer a transferrable shorter term warranty, or a limited lifetime?
 

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Marcus;

"In fact when we did a claim we analysed the serial number which would be in the form of
SG132XXXXXXXXX the SG was the location of production, the 1 was the year of manufacture (in this case 2001) and the 32 was the week of the year built. If that number was outside a year we then required POP. If it was inside a year we were instructed to process it as warranty."

You are just missing one part of the process, which is that it is at Apple’s digression whether to have the warranty customer provide proof of original ownership. Don't confuse what is a procedural process, with what legality of the warranty agreement stipulates. Some companies at various times will do warranty work without requiring customers to prove warranty fulfillment for various reasons; good will, internal cost of warranty procedure, shifting the burden to dealers, etc. That doesn't mean though that they couldn't or wouldn't turn around at some point and fully enforce all the restrictions in a warranty.

"Would you prefer a transferable shorter term warranty, or a limited lifetime?"

What makes sense as a supportable warranty policy for a company isn't up to me - its up to the company that has to provide the warranty. They have to look at the cost and benefits to warranty policies over time and determine if it makes fiscal sense. Many companies try ideas such as transferable warranties at different times but few industries can support the costs on a per unit basis. When you implement transferable warranties you are in effect supporting a secondary market which erodes the companies first sale market. Unless the company can cost justify such a warranty in the unit cost of the product/service, or can derive additional sales within the secondary market (ie upgrades, additional extended warranties, etc.) it make little sense to make the warranty survivable past the original owner. No sense in hamstringing a company just because the consumer wants additional benefit beyond the original or intended use of the product or service...


-CG
 

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My experiences in this indicate that few bow companies really check this. I have had great service from most of the major bow companies, and they were more concerned with me being satisfied than who bought the bow first.

Dan
 

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typically even on a second hand bow all the work is done through the archery shop. i have never had a shop ask for my name, social, adr, etc to get warrenty work done. the companies typically just honor the warrenty and go on. that is my experience anyway, the warrenty work is done off of the bow serial number i believe rather than owner info. if im not correct in this assumption feel free to correct me!!:D easton94
 
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