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Discussion Starter #1
I was thinking about buying an old Ben Pearson for $20 but it has a little bit of a twist in the upper limb, how do i fix it. Thanks
 

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Pat -

An "old" Pearson, with a limb twist? Yeah, right!!! Don't waste your money. Where did you say the bow was, by the by ... :)

LOL, welcome aboard. :darkbeer: Minor limb twists (meaning the string will stay on the limb when strung) usally aren't an problem and can either be left as is, or "bumped" back into shape by twisting it (UNSTRUNG) in the opposite direction. Sometimes a little warm (not hot) tap water can help in the limb is being stubborn.

A bigger factor is which Pearson model it is, draw weight and overall condition besides the twist. But ... for $20 ... :rolleyes:

Viper1 out.
 

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It would be nice if sombody came up with a sure cure for a twisted limb. I have a Ben Pearson BP - H52 7329 in very nice condition except, I think both limbs are twisted. I have tried the warm water and bumping it into place and it worked for about an hour.. Then it slowly twisted again and the string came off when I released an arrow. I tried it again with same results.I had the warm water method work before on other bows but this one will not cooperate.

I currently have the bow strung up and hanging in the bow rack thinking that may straighten it , if I leave it under preasure long enough.
Are there other ways.??.. ideas appreciated
 

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I ended up buying the ben pearson for $18 and its in pretty good condition but for the upper limb., Fl archer, i heard that if you soak it in warm water while twisting the limb to its origional form, then run it under cold water, then put the string on the bow for about 24 hours it will straighten up, but i havent tried it. I was trying to find out the best way to do it so i wouldnt screw it up.
 

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FLA -

The recurring twist is troublesome. If a limb takes a twist by standing on one end it will usually respond to bumping. If it responds and then reverts back, it could mean the cause hasn't been addressed. First check the string nocks and make sure they are symetrical in depth and height. If they are and the limbs keep retwisting, the worse case scenario is uneven tension on the glass or core. That could be a bad wood or glass laminate or a failing glue joint. That possibility would worry me enough NOT to leave the bow strung and make it a wall hanging.

If the twist is minor and refuses to correct, that's usually nothing to worry about.

Viper1 out.
 

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I hate to let it go, because it will straighten out and shoot fine for a short time. Then the bow string slowly moves to the left on both limbs after each shot. Then it pops off. @### It will probably be a wall hanger . Thanks!
 

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I've had a fair bit of success in repairing twists using this method. Mostly the cheaper Korean-made recurves, but I have fixed 2 older Bear Kodiaks and a Wing using this method.

You'll need a workbench that is firmly against the wall, and a hook screwed into into a wall stud on the far side of the bech, about 4" above the bench top. Attach a turnbuckle to the hook.

Clamp the bow to the edge of the workbench with C clamps, making sure you place a piece of wood between the clamp and the limb. You have to secure the bow so it doesn't slide on the bench when you apply side pressure. You have to put the clamp in the appropriate spot on the limb, depending on where most of the twist is. In most cases, you should put the clamp close to the riser, but sometime you need to clamp it nearer the recurve.

Take a loop of rope and hook it over the nock of the bow and to the hook on the turnbuckle, and tighten the turnbuckle so the limb is being bent sideways in the opposite direction of the twist. The amount of bend is trial-and-error, but don't be afraid to give it a good amount of twist.

Leave it overnight and check the twist. Repeat if necessary.

I've found that once you get it right when you first string up the bow, it'll tend to shift back a little towards the original twist, so it's best to very slightly overtwist the limb in the opposite direction of the original twist. That way it will settle down straight after a few days.

I would strongly suggest you NOT use heat and/or water, as this may cause permanent damage to the laminations.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the info everyone, and "STASH" ill give your procedure a try.
 

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Thank you, that is a well thought out set up. I had tried something around that basic idea using wood working table clamps and weights. Your set up is much better with more control then mine. My bow will make a good test subject. I will try it.....

I have to say, that the warm water dip and bump method has worked for me in the past, but for whatever reason this bow will not stay straight for very long. Viper may be correct in saying , there may be other problems causing it.

Thanks everyone
 
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