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Discussion Starter #1
I looked to see if anyone had posted this question before and didn't find it, so here we go. I am curious why limb vibration dampeners are always put on the back side of bow limbs and usually toward the ends? I am thinking from an engineering stand point that it would be more effective in the middle of the limb or even more towards the riser...and also wondered if anyone ever tested what effect they have stuck on the outside (face) of the limbs? Anybody have any light to shed on this?
I placed a set of Sims Ultra limb savers on my Mathews Ultra max as near the end, of the back side of the limbs, as recommended by that manufacturer and I have to honestly say that it doesn't appear to have made any noticable difference in vibration. And looking at them on the limb, where it was said to install them, it really doesn't look like the best place to absorb vibration in the limb.
 

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I've asked myself the same question quite often and like you said, the beginning of the limb or middle of the limb seems like a more logical place to put any form of shock absorber as opposed to the end of the limb, essentially stopping it before it starts, so to speak.

I'm interested in some inout on this as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Maybe we will get one of the engineering minds from SVL (Sims) in here to explain how they figured...or someone who had to do some design on these...maybe from BOWJAX.
I am tempted to putting a set of BowJax on the lower face of my limbs just about an inch or so away from the limb bolt....even with the end of the riser.
 

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I don't know if any of this is right but I'll try anyway. When the bow is shot the vibration starts at the string and travels through the limbs to the riser. So putting them at the cam side is getting to the vibration faster so thier is less at the riser, and if you put them on the outside they would fly off after a few shots. I have never been able to feel a differance with or without them but I still use them. TLC
 

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The limb flexes the most on the tip end--------that's where the most movement and vibration is and you want to get as close to that point as you can to calm it down. As far as being on the back side of the limb it's to help from catching them on something as your walking through the woods-------besides it looks better. All common sense things LOL.:wink: :) :darkbeer:
 

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I'm no engineer either, but, it makes sense to me...between the "frequency" of the string vibration, added to the energy the cams produce upon release, makes the best placement of the Limbsavers about where you have 'em, maybe more towards the riser by 1.5"-2". Just a guess on my part....
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Now here on my High Country, I installed the SVL Mini Extremes and they made an incredible difference...really tamed the vibration coming into my riser. So, it made me wonder if this wasn't a better area to stifle vibration. But they are a bit weighty!
I am also thinking now that it matters what brand of limbs....my Mathews limbs are very thick up towards the cam ends,Ultras didn't do much, but the High country limbs are thin at the ends and are thickest at the riser...The Sims Limb Saver Ultras did make some difference on the HC being installed up towards the ends.

 

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Discussion Starter #9
Moose mustard said:
as close to the inside end of the limb without interfering with the cables....about where you have yours.
Yes I know that is where the instructions tell you to put them, but that is why I started this post...I don't think that is the best place or at least not the best place on all limbs.
 

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Mrwintr said:
Yes I know that is where the instructions tell you to put them, but that is why I started this post...I don't think that is the best place or at least not the best place on all limbs.
In other words your saying that the biggest damping vibration company in the world doesn't have a clue how their products should be used LMAO. they make damping devices for all kinds of products------I would hope they know what they are doing.:confused: :wink: :) :darkbeer:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Dale_B1 said:
In other words your saying that the biggest damping vibration company in the world doesn't have a clue how their products should be used LMAO. they make damping devices for all kinds of products------I would hope they know what they are doing.:confused: :wink: :) :darkbeer:
I didn't say they haven't a clue, but I have spoke to someone there on the phone and they didn't sound overly brilliant. I just think they had an idea and started selling it like hot cakes and maybe overlooked some of the differences between bows and said to heck with testing and designing anymore cause they are already getting rich. I wasn't really bashing on their products, I just got done posting that their Mini Extremes worked wonders on my High Country and look at where they are placed!
 

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Lol each of their products are designed to do a different thing, to say the extremes are the same as the limb savers is wrong. They take care of different areas of the bow for very different reasons. That's like comparing them to the Leeches, cable dampener and the mini acc. ones, saying they all do the same thing. Each has it's place and reason for being there. Yes Sims makes a bunch of money on a product that does work how it was intended to. They are not a small company that just doesn't throw a gimmick out there-----their product goes through extensive testing. they work and they work the way they are intended. The shop I work at is a Dealer for over 20 bow lines and they work in the same exact way on all bows. I've installed thousands of sets of them I think I know what I'm talking about.:wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Why is it......

Every time I start a thread, asking for some input and discussion about something, someone comes along and turns it all around into a pissing match??
I was thinking maybe instead of spending a %@#& load of $$ experimenting with the Limb dampeners myself..i might find some other people who had tried some different placements...THAT'S ALL I was trying to find out.:boink:
 

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Dale_B1 said:
The limb flexes the most on the tip end--------that's where the most movement and vibration is and you want to get as close to that point as you can to calm it down. As far as being on the back side of the limb it's to help from catching them on something as your walking through the woods-------besides it looks better. All common sense things LOL.:wink: :) :darkbeer:
+1
 

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Mrwintr, the likely reason they don't do much for your Mathews is because it is already a very shock free bow. Sims is a multi-industry dampning manufacture. They didn't get their by not testing their products.
 

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Mrwintr said:
Every time I start a thread, asking for some input and discussion about something, someone comes along and turns it all around into a pissing match??
I was thinking maybe instead of spending a %@#& load of $$ experimenting with the Limb dampeners myself..i might find some other people who had tried some different placements...THAT'S ALL I was trying to find out.:boink:
Hello Mrwintr:

It has to do with several engineering concept called
moment arm and momentum. Folks are confusing two different things.

You asked a very good question.
The placement of the limb savers for purposes of absorbing shock alone, will work anywhere on the bow limb.


Oscillation is the movement of a solid object (it wiggles back and forth a very small amount at a very high frequency).

You "feel" shock. If you are holding a tuning fork,
and I hit it, and your eyes are closed, you will feel the vibration resonating in your hand.

You "see" oscillation. If you look at the tuning fork,
and before I hit it, the tuning fork looks clear.

After I hit the tuning fork, and it is wiggling back and forth at high speed,
the tuning fork looks blurry.

If I touch the tuning fork at the tip,
or the middle
or at the shaft, close to your hand where you are holding it,
my body will help to absorb the shock energy,
and the tuning fork will stop vibrating.

So, a limb saver can "ABSORB" the shock energy
anywhere you glue on the limbsaver.

I typically glue limbsavers on my recurve limbs
closer to the riser for maintaining the speed of my recurve limb tips.
A recurve has much less draw weight,
and limb tip speed is important.

So, for purposes of absorbing the shock energy,
anywhere will work. The shock energy travels several hundred miles per hour. If you and I hold a steel rod,
and I hit it with a hammer,
you will feel the impact in milliseconds.


The reason Simms recommends the
placement of the limbsaver at the "outboard" position
as more to do with dampening the oscillation (movement of the limbs).

Oscillation and shock are two different things,
but inter-related.
 

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Wasn't there a slo-motion film of limbsavers floating around on the net somewhere?
Stretching out like rubber bands when you let go of the release?
I recall also someone putting more than one on the limbs and running a chrony, but I cant find that thread.
 
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