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I am shooting about at 60-65 lb, 400 grain beman arrow, 100 grain field tip/broadhead. I am pretty happy with my arrow flight up to 30-35 yds. At 35-40 my arrows begin dropping pretty drastically. Is this common? I have never attempted a shot further than 30 yards in the field, but with todays technology, a 35-40 shot shoudnt be out of the question either. I know there are experts on this site who have a lot of experience at distances much greater than what I have mentioned here. I enjoy shooting my bow but find it very challenging at distances greater than 35 yards. I know the best thing to do is practice, but do you folks have any words of wisdom for shooting longer distances? Thanks in advance.
 

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Practice, Practice, Practice..............tune, tune, tune..............Practice, Practice some more

The key to long shots is practice, Patience for just the right shot, confidence, and knowing when it is too far or you shouldn't take that shot.
 

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Technology

Don't let "today's technology" lure you into a false sense of security and a superpredator mindset. It is still called ARCHery, with the arch being the key.

Find your comfort zone and think about how far your hunting shots really are. Practice to the outer edge of that zone.

With practice you can extend your range, but focus on "your zone".

I've watched way too many "archers" shooting out to 50 yards, because " they have a new sight with a 50 yard pin". Can't hit with any consistency, but they can shoot that far.

Then again, I've seen recurve target shoots nail the X ring at 90 meters with no sight......an a cross wind!

Practice.....a good recommendation.
 

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hayslope said:
Don't let "today's technology" lure you into a false sense of security and a superpredator mindset. It is still called ARCHery, with the arch being the key.

Find your comfort zone and think about how far your hunting shots really are. Practice to the outer edge of that zone.

With practice you can extend your range, but focus on "your zone".

I've watched way too many "archers" shooting out to 50 yards, because " they have a new sight with a 50 yard pin". Can't hit with any consistency, but they can shoot that far.

Then again, I've seen recurve target shoots nail the X ring at 90 meters with no sight......an a cross wind!

Practice.....a good recommendation.
buckangler,
Welcome to Archery Talk! :welcome:

I have to agree with everything that hayslope stated. :thumb: Shoot within your own abilities. :nod:

Good hunting, Bowhunter57
 

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With Broadheads one can fine tune their bow to shoot perfectly. Provided that bow is one that has the ability to shoot perfectly.......But anyway,,,, My effective range with my set up may be 50 yrds and yours may be 25 or what ever. They key here is to be ethical. one must never take shots beyond their own personal effective range.....

The other day a bud an I were playing with our Hunting setups and consitantly were hitting a 9 inch paper plat on a 20 x20 Broad head block with hunting arrows tipped with fixed blade 125 grain t-heads out to 70 and 80 yrds....... Now I surely wouldn't launch a arrow at a great whitetail that far but It does have its merit...... You feel way comfortable at 50 if you can hit a plate witha fixed blade head at 80....... being comfortable on your abilities at your effective range makes it your effective range. if your not comfortable. it is too far....... let the shot pass..... wait for a closer one.... It is not about takign a long shot. it is about taking a shot beyond what you have prepared for..... and feel comfortable with..... You can not get comfort on 30 yrd shots by only practicing at 30 yrds....... your comfort level will be less then what you practice. that is why folks need to practice much farther then they would ever consider taking a shot......

That builds the comofort level for hunting yardages..... Too me there is no other way to build that hunting shot confidence........ Sorry for the long post
 

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Keep on the practice. While I enjoy double lunging a 3d deer at long range,60-70 yards, real hunting shots in the areas I'm in are never going to be more then 30 yards. Tell you what though, after getting comfortable with the long shots on targets it sure makes the 20-30 yard shots easy.
 

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as mentioned....

its all about practice. Distance does, however depend on your set-up. If you are comfy at 20-35 for hunting, by many hunters standards, that is plenty. By quite a few others standards 35-50 is a piece of cake. If it is close to your season, I would recomend practicing the shots you expect to take from your stand rather than trying to become comfy shooting longer distances. Thats just my opinion, cuz if you did want to get comfy shooting farther Im sure you could. I am comfortable shooting 70 in practice, but would not shoot at a deer beyond 40 yrds(this year, maybe next). Good luck this season, and just dont take shots that you havent practiced and you will do fine.
 

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Instead of seeing how far you can shoot at an animal, why not learn how to get close enough to count their eyelashes? Anyone can "shoot" animals at distance (and wounding shots increase in percentage the further you shoot...grouping ability doesn't get better with distance, LOL).

It takes a woodsman to get close to animals. That is what archery has always been for me...an up-close and personal encounter. If I want to just croak them at long distances, I have rifles... :wink:
 

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buckangler said:
I am shooting about at 60-65 lb, 400 grain beman arrow, 100 grain field tip/broadhead. I am pretty happy with my arrow flight up to 30-35 yds. At 35-40 my arrows begin dropping pretty drastically. Is this common? I have never attempted a shot further than 30 yards in the field, but with todays technology, a 35-40 shot shoudnt be out of the question either. I know there are experts on this site who have a lot of experience at distances much greater than what I have mentioned here. I enjoy shooting my bow but find it very challenging at distances greater than 35 yards. I know the best thing to do is practice, but do you folks have any words of wisdom for shooting longer distances? Thanks in advance.
At 35-40 my arrows begin dropping pretty drastically. Is this common?
yes it is common.

but do you folks have any words of wisdom for shooting longer distances?
the longer the distance the more your form becomes critical. So work on form up close and then it might get a bit better farther out.

As for myself I'm not looking to shoot far, I spend all my time trying to figure out how close can I get.
 

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buckangler said:
I am shooting about at 60-65 lb, 400 grain beman arrow, 100 grain field tip/broadhead. I am pretty happy with my arrow flight up to 30-35 yds. At 35-40 my arrows begin dropping pretty drastically. Is this common?.
for both?

No...not common at all but can happen :rolleyes:

an arrows drop based on the bleed off of energy is consistent unless there is an outside force such as tune,broadhead design or arrow balance.

Look deeper into the problem :wink:

just speaking about field point arrows....

are you at 10% foc?

have you done a flight tuning to insure that your timing is correct?
(single cams can and do go out of time...all the time :wink: :D)

There is definitely something at work here and it can be overcome but you first need to find it :embara:
 

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buckangler said:
I am shooting about at 60-65 lb, 400 grain beman arrow, 100 grain field tip/broadhead. I am pretty happy with my arrow flight up to 30-35 yds. At 35-40 my arrows begin dropping pretty drastically. Is this common? I have never attempted a shot further than 30 yards in the field, but with todays technology, a 35-40 shot shoudnt be out of the question either. I know there are experts on this site who have a lot of experience at distances much greater than what I have mentioned here. I enjoy shooting my bow but find it very challenging at distances greater than 35 yards. I know the best thing to do is practice, but do you folks have any words of wisdom for shooting longer distances? Thanks in advance.

I see you live in Ohio, so I assume you're hunting whitetails 90+% of the time......if you know how to hunt them, you shouldn't need to shoot beyond 35 yards.....I've bow-killed dozens of 'em, and never had to shoot past 30 yards, with most being 20 yards or less.....

It's good to PRACTICE at longer ranges.....NOT to shoot at live game that far, but because it makes your actual, shorter game-shots seem much easier and you learn to hold your pin steadier! :wink:

Like "hayslope" said earlier in this thread.....bowhunting is a short-range sport.....always has been, always will be......regardless of the technology of today's compounds, don't get lulled into thinking you have a "stringed-rifle" in your hands! :embara: :rolleyes:
 

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TexasGuy said:
It's good to PRACTICE at longer ranges.....NOT to shoot at live game that far, but because it makes your actual, shorter game-shots seem much easier and you learn to hold your pin steadier! :wink:

I take the time to shoot long shots in my practice sessions for the same reason. It's fun too. :)
 

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Gritty said:
With Broadheads one can fine tune their bow to shoot perfectly. Provided that bow is one that has the ability to shoot perfectly.......But anyway,,,, My effective range with my set up may be 50 yrds and yours may be 25 or what ever. They key here is to be ethical. one must never take shots beyond their own personal effective range.....

The other day a bud an I were playing with our Hunting setups and consitantly were hitting a 9 inch paper plat on a 20 x20 Broad head block with hunting arrows tipped with fixed blade 125 grain t-heads out to 70 and 80 yrds....... Now I surely wouldn't launch a arrow at a great whitetail that far but It does have its merit...... You feel way comfortable at 50 if you can hit a plate witha fixed blade head at 80....... being comfortable on your abilities at your effective range makes it your effective range. if your not comfortable. it is too far....... let the shot pass..... wait for a closer one.... It is not about takign a long shot. it is about taking a shot beyond what you have prepared for..... and feel comfortable with..... You can not get comfort on 30 yrd shots by only practicing at 30 yrds....... your comfort level will be less then what you practice. that is why folks need to practice much farther then they would ever consider taking a shot......

That builds the comofort level for hunting yardages..... Too me there is no other way to build that hunting shot confidence........ Sorry for the long post
Gritty, that was very well said and gets my vote as well. Folks out west have to shoot some longer distances than those in wooded areas and I can't for the life of me figure out why the ethical police beat on everyone who says they shoot further than 30 yards. Or that they aren't much of a hunter if they can't get that close, come on out and try it guys. Practice is the key to anything in life but especially with archery. Practicing out beyond your effective game taking range is good advice as it makes your effective range shots seem easier mentally, kind of opens up the spot so to speak.
 

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What vanes are you shooting, it makes a big difference. For instance, 4" quickspins, and 4" vanetecs tend to slow the arrow down and drop off after 35-45 yards a little more drastically than some other vanes. Not always, but usually.
 

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Bow_Rep said:
Instead of seeing how far you can shoot at an animal, why not learn how to get close enough to count their eyelashes? Anyone can "shoot" animals at distance (and wounding shots increase in percentage the further you shoot...grouping ability doesn't get better with distance, LOL).

It takes a woodsman to get close to animals. That is what archery has always been for me...an up-close and personal encounter. If I want to just croak them at long distances, I have rifles... :wink:

That is expected when you have woods to hunt. When it is open range, that is a whole different story. I've seen where 50 yards was incredibly close and took hours to get there. It's just different situations in different areas. Unless you've been there and done that, don't knock on those that have.
 

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AK-AZ said:
That is expected when you have woods to hunt. When it is open range, that is a whole different story. I've seen where 50 yards was incredibly close and took hours to get there. It's just different situations in different areas. Unless you've been there and done that, don't knock on those that have.

You are right, It isnt like sitting in a treestand requires "woodsmanship" anyways
 
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