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Discussion Starter #1
I am tired of paying everytime I need something done to my bow, and would prefer to work on it myself because I am very particuliar. I am thinking of buying an omni press on here. It looks to me like it would do a good job, and the price is right. I am just concerned that I may somehow damage my bow, and void the warranty in the process.

Can anyone offer some advice, or words of wisdom...to either put me at ease of steer me clear of doing my own work?

Thanks
 

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I pressed a ton of different bows with my Omni it worked well, i never worry about press approval from the mfg, if i wreck something pressing my bow i deserve to pay out of my pocket. make sure you get the U pins..i used them on every bow. i bought a Toad press to replace the Omni and the guy i sold it to is happy with it.
 

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Doing your own work can be very satisfying and cost effective BUT it takes time to learn and it takes some money to get all of the various tools. If you enjoy building and fixing things, enjoy challenges and are a perfectionist, then by all means get a press and other tools. It really isn't rocket science. Chances are slim that you will cause more damage than what you are fixing to begin with but it can happen especially when you start to do tuning. If you get frustrated easily, have little patience and not willing to learn from your mistakes, then keep going to your favorite pro shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the advice. I am leaning towards getting a press. I am a perfectionist and very patient when it comes to stuff like this. I'm confident I could learn, and I know that once I learned, I would have my bow setup well. Is the omni press setup ok/safe for the bow? I am wondering if the posts that are placed on the limb, right by the riser is the best way to do this.???
 

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What kind of bow do you have? I know that x-force bows need an adapter for a lot of presses. If you are looking for a portable press that will handle all kinds of bows then http://nitehawkarchery.com/default.htm is what I have and it works awesome.
 

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what bow do you have? pretty much anyone who has a omni has been happy with them. there not the greatest press made but they do work fine, but i dont believe you can do a total tear down with a omni though, but for changing strings,peeps and tuning they work fine.

heres a list of bows i pressed..switch back and XT, Truth 1, bowtech Equalizer,Commander, diamond Triumph,black ice,Hoyt ultratech,rintech, Stacey mighty mite PSE bowmadness, Brute.

the U pins will help press at the tip of the limbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the input everyone. I have a Reezen right now. I PMd the guy (Ken?) at nighthawk, and am awaiting a reply. I'm just not sure about it. For a bit more, the omni looks like a better press.
 

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yes you can. It takes a little more effort than a dedicated table stand but it will completely take them down. I got mine in just a few days after order and tried it on my BIL's PSE stinger and old Pearson before doing on my Axe. It worked flawlessly.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok, so I went on to the Mathews site and downloaded the owners manual. It shows the Reezen in an x-press, and it looks like the bottom posts are positioned to go through the riser where the dampers are. Can this really be the best way to press one?
 

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If you can afford it i would go with a linear press. they work by simply pressing in on the limb tips and fwork really really well. I just bought a press this past Febuary and i ended up settling on a EZ press and i am glad i did. very easy to use, i can do what ever i need to do and can do it fast. If you can take the time to go and observe your local pro shop working on different bows, or maybe even yours. Some shops will let you do it and some won't but you won't know until you ask, and it a great way to see how things are done on your particular bow. Good luck in your choose.
 

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Take a look at the $20 bow press thread in the DIY section. I posted some pictures in the thread of my press which allows me to take down my pearson pitbull and pearson stealth.

Most press work is just to replace strings and cables and to adjust the lengths of the strings and such. So it might be cost effective to get a press for just working on the strings and take the bow to a shop when you need a full take down. Prices vary but one of the shops around here charges $85 dollars for a full take down and lube.
 

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I am tired of paying everytime I need something done to my bow, and would prefer to work on it myself because I am very particuliar. I am thinking of buying an omni press on here. It looks to me like it would do a good job, and the price is right. I am just concerned that I may somehow damage my bow, and void the warranty in the process.

Can anyone offer some advice, or words of wisdom...to either put me at ease of steer me clear of doing my own work?

Thanks
I pressed a ton of different bows with my Omni it worked well, i never worry about press approval from the mfg, if i wreck something pressing my bow i deserve to pay out of my pocket. make sure you get the U pins..i used them on every bow. i bought a Toad press to replace the Omni and the guy i sold it to is happy with it.
Doing your own work can be very satisfying and cost effective BUT it takes time to learn and it takes some money to get all of the various tools. If you enjoy building and fixing things, enjoy challenges and are a perfectionist, then by all means get a press and other tools. It really isn't rocket science. Chances are slim that you will cause more damage than what you are fixing to begin with but it can happen especially when you start to do tuning. If you get frustrated easily, have little patience and not willing to learn from your mistakes, then keep going to your favorite pro shop.
All good statements, just keep in mind that warranties are void if work is not done by an authorized dealer... I have guys that put small things on like string loops and peeps...and it is a liability to even do that on your own.

Just last week a guy brought in his bow with a blown string, and when asked if it was dry-fired he said no, that he'd had his loop break while he was checking it at full draw and no arrow - duh!? that is a dry-fire and the warranty is gone due to his decision to work on it himself. Manufacturers have seen enough damage to their bows to know the difference between defective product and defective choices...
 

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All good statements, just keep in mind that warranties are void if work is not done by an authorized dealer... I have guys that put small things on like string loops and peeps...and it is a liability to even do that on your own.QUOTE]

True, fine for you guy's, but what do you do if there are no authorized dealers in the county, or even in the country?
I reckon you could probably count the number of good bow tech's in England using only the fingers of one hand, I don't know any (good ones that is):thumbs_do

So, I invested in the equipement and learnt stuff.
I fix and tune all my own, I now have my buddies bringing me theirs to do as well.

Kev
 

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Discussion Starter #18
That stinks Kev. It is nice having a decent pro shop farily close, but I still want to do my own work...I know that I will take all the time I need to make it perfect...or at least as perfect as my ability will allow, and I will learn.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hey everyone, I'm still wondering about this:

Ok, so I went on to the Mathews site and downloaded the owners manual. It shows the Reezen in an x-press, and it looks like the bottom posts are positioned to go through the riser where the dampers are. Can this really be the best way to press one?
 

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Hey everyone, I'm still wondering about this:
Omni Presses similar to the X press, the Omni would work fine on a Reezen the lower pins go against the limb as close to the limb pocket/riser as possible.

personally if i was you i would by a linear press so if you need to save up some money it is deffinetly woth the wait, i bought a Toad and its awsome, i think there is 2 guys selling linear presses yet Omni and another guy who just started making them...check it out and see the linear is deffinetly better.
 
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