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Looking for Advice

343 Views 6 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  MN_Chick
Hello. Recently I went out with some of my friends and tried archery. I really enjoyed it and now I would like to purchase some archery equipment to mess around with target archery in my back yard. Problem is I have no clue where to start, what to get, or anything. I would really appreciate it if someone could direct me to a thread, site, or maybe just give me some advice on where to start.
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Hello. Recently I went out with some of my friends and tried archery. I really enjoyed it and now I would like to purchase some archery equipment to mess around with target archery in my back yard. Problem is I have no clue where to start, what to get, or anything. I would really appreciate it if someone could direct me to a thread, site, or maybe just give me some advice on where to start.
1st step would be to go to a local pro shop and get your DL measured. You don't want to start with a bow that does not fit. Next look at your budget and get something for a decent price....you would not want to get the cheapest thing available (makes for a bad archery experience) or too expensive (in case you don't like it). The clasified ads here on AT is a great place to get everything you need to get rolling. There is also alot of info in this section of AT. http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/forumdisplay.php?f=121. Good luck and Welcome to AT!!!! :wink: Lots of great folks and useful info here.
 

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You start by going to a Archery shop And trying out some bows. Are you looking at compound or recurve bows? Find one that feels good to you. Most that you will see will be in camo that is ok they come in target colors. When you find one that feels good to you look on here for a used one it will save you some money. Do not but the bottom of the line bow. You will soon want to up grade. Then you get some arrows that are the correct spine. Since you said that you want to target shoot then you will be looking at a moving sight. Again look here or ebay for it. Then you need a rest you dont have to buy the most expensive there are some cheap ones that work just as well. If you are going to shoot a release then I would say to get a Carter Evolution learn back tension. It will help with your shooting. As soon or before you et all your equipment find a good coach to get you started off dont learn bad habbits that you will fight to break later.
 

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Compounds have a much shorter learning curve (shorter by many years). Compounds are more accurate. More can go wrong with compounds than recurves. Recurves are less high tec. Dont get me wrong I shoot both and love shooting my recurves. When I just want to relax and shoot I take out my long bow .Just a stick and a string:wink:
 

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With a recurve, if it says it's 50 lbs, you hold 50 lbs of tension every time you draw it. With a compound, the weird shape of the cams allows you to pull past 50 lbs and settle in at full draw at somewhere half that weight. So, a 50 lb compound only requires 25lbs or less to hold it. That's the first advantage: You don't tire so quickly.

So, based on that, Recurves are at full power at full draw, and release their energy as you let the arrow go, getting weaker and weaker until the bow is where it started. Compounds start slow, and build to full power accellerating the arrow faster as it leaves the bow, and then the power drops off. The "
power curve" stays at maximum much longer than an equivalent weight recurve.

Recurves are easier to start on, as you don't need to be so specific on draw length and you don't get all tangled up in buying all those pretty gadgets that Compound shooters love so much. If your draw length is a bit longer, you just pull the bow back more. In order for the cams on a Compound to work, you need to be very specific on draw length, or find a Compound that has a fairly wide range of adjustments without going back to the shop every time you want to change something.

Target shooters have been using Recurves for years, and it's the only type allowed for Olympic competition. If you plan on hunting, it's a different story. For a new shooter, a recurve with enough power to adequately hunt with will require some strength in muscles you didn't even know you had until they start hurting. Being easier to hold at full draw, and launching arrows so much faster than Recurves, Compound bows are the usual choice for bowhunters.

Much of the enjoyment of archery is in talking about it with others, so there will never be a shortage of people willing to help. Either way, find a shop and ask a lot of questions, and try a few bows for yourself before committing to a purchase.
 

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Another idea is to check local archery shops for used bows. You can get a good bow, fully set up, for a very reasonable price. Talk to the shop owners. They will often have a good idea of which bows in their inventory would be good for a beginner.
Personally, I prefer buying at the shop instead of online. I can always go in with problems or questions and they take very good care of me. It is an excellent resource.
 
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