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Just my fellow brethren I too lost a deer today - Opening Day for us here in Illinois. But, I know I hit him...maybe a little too low. Since I am an inexperienced hunter I waited only 10 minutes before I went to find him. However, I found blood and at first couldn't find the arrow. I attempted to trail him, but the blood was not all that significant...just like one of our fellow hunters experienced. It was about a 35 yard shot and I hit him where I think I should have, but now believe I may have shot a tad bit low. When I hit him he jumped up and then kicked like I have seen many, many times on OLN. I knew I hit him when he did that. He then ran off to the right. I didn't think he would go far, especially since he was on a small peninsula. Well, after I tried to find him, I went back again and finally found my Muzzy 100 Broadhead covered with blood and pinkish tissue on the fletching. I'll try and upload a photo of it before I close out. I showed it to the game warden and he smelled the arrow and told me I may have gut shot it and not to go back out tonight to look for it since we would just push it farther. He believes I hit it pretty good and should have waited longer to find it. I truly hope it can be found tomorrow. Tonight it's supposed to get down into the 20's here - - bone chilling!!!
 

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I would sure like to see a moratorium on the "lost animal" posts here on AT. Stories like this sure don't do the community any good if the wrong people get a hold of them.
 

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Pinkish tissue could either be fat or lung. It doesn't sound like gut shot. Otherwise half digested food would be on your arrow.

If you hit the fat layer at the bottom of the brisket then its quite possible the deer may live. If you hit the lungs, it's down.
Dylan
 

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BowD:

As unfortunate as these incidents are, they are valueable learning tools.

I believe people post here for the valued advice in terms of how to "act" under such "conditions". The posting on sites such as these are meant for educational/learning purposes...not for "fuel" for the antis or some other ARA group. As far as I'm concerned, they can kiss my ass. I'm far more concerned trying to help fellow bowhunters and hoping that we all can learn from each others' mistakes.


Govtman:

With that said, I'd say based on the pictures that you had a complete pass through, with some relatively decent blood/tissue and a little bit of entrails.

Can you give more details regarding the hit? It was low, but low where? low in the pocket? low and back? low and middle?

You said you took up trail after 10 minutes. First thing to remember, as you will learn from experience, is to wait at least 45 minutes before even getting down. Then go to the spot of the shot and mark it (toilet paper works well) and if the arrow is right there, inspect it to determine the hit. If you had a truly vital hit, 9 times out of 10 you should see or hear that deer go down within 100 yards. (i.e. heart or double lung)

Never go beyond that initial shot point until you are confident the deer is down. If there were no arrow, I would inspect the hair and blood on the ground and that would determine my next steps. If I have bright red blood with bubbles in it, I know I at least hit a single lung. I'd probably wait at least another hour suspecting a single lung hit and then start taking up the trail.

Anything else, such as the entrails on your arrow...I'd let the deer sit for at least 6 hours. With the cold temps out there now and tonight, its a good idea to let the deer sit until morning.

So, a few more questions. After following up after 10 minutes, did you bump the deer? i.e. kick it up? Did you ever see the deer again? Do you have any details on the type of hair found at the spot? What level on the brush and what kind of blood are you finding?

The more details you can give, the more we may be able to help.

Regardless, I'd take up the trail tomorrow morning at first light and make your goal finding where that deer either fell fatally or bedded down. Usually when you let them sit after a bad shot, they will bed down and eventually die there.

So, don't get discouraged, keep at it and go find that deer in the morning! Regardless of the outcome, take this and every hunting experience as a lesson learned and leverage off that information learned in future hunts!

Good luck bud, post more details if you can and we'll see if we can help! :)
 

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You want my honest opinion about this matter. Its a simple mistake, maybe a slight misjudge of distance. A poorly placed shot.

But as far as the Anti hunter concern themselves in this matter, they can suck a root.

Hunting has gone on for far longer then their feeble minds can comprehend. When there were not compounds, or bows at all, there were spears with stone tips, or even just sharpened and fire hardened at the ends.

Im sure many more animals fell to injury and were never found by their human hunters. But I would guess that the other predators and scavangers had their fill because of that.

We don't have to shy away from making mistakes for fear of someone that has nothing better to do then be against hunting. Because we are humans doesn't make us any less of an animal then the rest of them.

So be proud, try to find your animal and this will be a learning experience.
Dylan
 

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I wouldn't worry-You hit it good enough to make it pass through! You will find it not far from where it was shot!
Keep your head up!
by the way, NICE BOW! (we shoot almost the exact same set up! Mine is a Carbon 4-Runner, but everything else maches!)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the experience

BowhunterNJ,

Thanks for the information. Seems like you have a lot of experience. I did not see any hair left at the sight. I believe it was behind the shoulder and about mid to low. I shot the deer while on the ground standing since I fell out of my new Summit Bullet Tree Climber from about four or five feet! I was attempting to adjust it and fell back and down. I'm hurting and feel really sore but thank God that I did not fall on top of anything else...no...I was not carrying my bow or arrows up with me...they were tied off on a nylon string which earlier burnt my fingers after it slipped down too fast with my backpack! Talk about learning a lot of lessons today. I don't think I'll ever use a climbing tree stand again...just too many risks there!

Anyway, I do hope to that the deer is found tomorrow. I'm hoping it wasn't a gut shot. And, I feel really bad about this happening. Like I said, there was some spattering of blood where I found my broadhead, but not much after that at all! I just don't understand why not. When I saw the buck kicking I also heard the arrow hitting. First the arrow hitting...pow...and then the buck kicking just like on OLN. The game warden is heading the search for the buck. I've got to recuperate from the fall and soreness.

IMHO, these replies are all lessons for us to learn from. I'm sure some people don't like us hunting and I can understand...this is their opinion. This is America and there will be differences which is okay. As long as they are not in the extreme or acted upon negatively to those that enjoy the wildlife and literally place food on the table.


:rolleyes:
 

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be glad its going to be cold there tonight and the meat will still be good tomorrow.

Brian
 

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Yet again, I am amaized. Did everyone miss the "top 10 things to do when blood trailing" efresher post that was on this forum in early Sept.?

Rule one, When in Doubt, back out! If you can't find an arrow, don't know exactly where you hit it, exactly what organs were hit, etc... don't try to track it for at least an hour. Until you know your shot is a vital shot, hold up. There is nothing good that can come from pushing a wounded deer (with only a few very minor exceptions).

And to the poster who said..."You hit it good enough to get a pass through...." PPPPPPLEASE! You can shoot a deer through the brisquet (the lower forward part of the deer) and get a pass through, yet it won't die... ever. Gut shoot one... clean through and it may or may not live. A pass through means nothing other than you have good KE and sharp broadheads.

Enough on the preachers pallet...

To the story at hand... It appears, with the little info. that we have, that you have shot low on this deer. At 35 yds, anything is possible, but my guess is that you shot through the lower part of the chest and missed the lungs. The rubbery/fatty tissue is likely grissel. I'd bet you have short white hairs either on the arrow or on the ground where you hit it. Let me tell you that there is NO mistaking a gut shot deer... the smell and the particles on the arrow are unmistakeable. No other part of the deer smells or leaves particles on your arrow like the gut. Lungs are similiar.... bubbles and pink/bright red... no other part of the deer produces blood like that.

My intuition tells me that you hit it, but luckily the hit is low, and the deer will likely survive without issue. You may have gotten lucky enough to clip a lung, but by trailing it after only 10 minutes, may have killed your chances by bumping the deer up out of its bed.

Too many variables, but at this point in time, with what I have to go on, I'd bet on "Your lucky and didn't kill this deer" before "It's dead and you won't find it" and definitely before "It's dead and you'll find it."

Sorry to be so honest about the situation, but you created it.... so learn from it. Not just the shot portion either, learn from your tracking/retrieval mistakes and DON"T repeat them the next time you stick an animal.

Siefrj
 

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1. you hit really low in the chest-all you geniuses thinking he may have caught lung need to look at a anatomy chart.
2. You made lots of mistakes here that really should have been avoided, being new is not as good an excuse anymore, since you have the capabilities to read and learn many helpful tips from the tracking thread that was on here.
3. if you hit low and caught the heart the deer should be found a short distance away. If you hit back behind the heart nad nicked gut/liver, the deer is findable, but you better hope someone good is tracking it.
4.Please learn from this and don't make the same mistakes again.
 

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I think the Warden is right.Look at all the green stuff on the fletching.I would say its a gut shot.Should have waited at least 2-4 hours before tracking.
 

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Well...the only thing I can say is...if you execute a shot properly...you really shouldn't SEE where it hits...but you should KNOW where it hits. If you ever SEE where you hit, it should be well after the shot...

With that said, I guess I find it hard to understand clearly where shots are placed...especially via description. Alot happens in a very short period of time when you shoot an animal, so try to be as detailed as possible when requesting help on here.

"Low" or "High" or "Middle" are extremely vague. Even "Right behind the should" is relative to who is saying it.

If I say "right behind the shoulder", I mean just that...as in within an INCH. 6 inches behind the shoulder is not "right behind it", it is "6 inches behind it".


Alot of the recommendations and guidance on here, including my own, is HIGHLY speculative. We are speculating 100% on the accuracy of the information given and applying our OWN logic to the scenario based on the "hints" of the hit given.

For example, as mentioned above, if someone tells me they hit the deer low...I am going to apply what I think is low and thing perhaps lower heart.

Anything beyond that and it is a miss. Anything left or right of that isn't just "low".

So I guess it is all how each of us perceives the information given and hope that information applies to our own definitions of the descriptive hits.

There is no way our "conclusions" can be even remotely near 100% accurate, since we have absolutely no "real" information to go on. If we were there, observed the place of the hit, the arrow, the blood, the sign, the hair, etc...it would be a different story. But in the end, we are going solely based on another hunters description and his own personal definition of the hit. And more often than not, when a bad hit is made, a hunter will make it seems as if it really wasn't THAT bad...it was just a LITTLE back.

So, we take what he says for face value and assume it was indeed just a LITTLE back and not 14" back.

Another lesson learned for all those that post on here looking for advice on tracking wounded deer. If you want our help, post the details of your hit as accurately and subjectively as possible. Realize your information is the ONLY medium we have to work with, and if you hope to extract value from our replies, be honest with yourself and with us about the shot placement and if you even truly know where the deer was hit.

And to recite what was said above and in other threads of this type...WHEN IN DOUBT, BACK OUT!


Good luck all, shoot straight!
 

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raylandarcher:

I believe a more accurate time period to wait on a paunch hit deer is at least 6-8 hours and preferably overnight if temperatures permit.

2-4 hours, IMO, in inadequate and will likely result in bumping the deer and making the tracking job alot more difficult.

Someone correct me if I am wrong, but I believe that is what I have read in several bowhunting articles and remember from the bowhunting education class I took quite a few years ago.
 

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6-8hrs

BowhunterNJ-

I'll agree with the 6-8hrs and overnight if temps allow, at least that is what I would do, and 2-4hrs on a liver/1 lung hit. A double lung/heart shot well I normally see them go down, but I wait 30 minutes to calm down or I'll get to the ground a lot faster than I should, if you know what I mean. :D ;)
 

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I have an EASY Solution to this. Govtman, your answer to these questions will tell all.

1. Where was your pin, when you shot?
2. What was your first instinct on where you hit it?

Unrelated question - if you are such a new bowhunter, what are you shooting 35 yards for?

Bo

PS - Have you found the deer yet?

PSS - What the heck you shooting a dink 6 point for when you live in Illinois?!??!?!;) :D
 

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I agree with a few things said:

1 - There's NO mistaking the smell of a gut-shot arrow, for starters...

2 - 6 to 8 hours before tracking an animal hit like that...

3 - 35 yards IS too far for an in-experienced bowhunter to shoot at a game animal, IMO...


I have taken quite a few double lung hit deer, and have yet to have one go more than 50 yards max, so we know that's not where THIS deer was hit... Everyone will, sooner or later, lose a deer - it's unfortunate, but that's pretty much the way it is... It's what you learn from it, and how it affects your decisions in the future that are going to define you as a hunter - IF it doesn't really bother you all that much, and you keep doing it, then you're a slob hunter that shouldn't be bowhunting, IMO... IF you take it as seriously as it should be taken, and do EVERYTHING humanly possible to prevent it from happening again, then you've become a better hunter than you are right now... Also, to me a lost doe is EVERY BIT as important as a lost buck - they're both game animals that deserve a humane death, and their meat is equally as important not to waste.. I don't know anything other than what you've posted(which DID take guts to do, BTW), but it sounds like you need to be a little more conservative on your shot selection... I wish you luck, and hope you find your deer... Never forget the awful feeling in your stomach about this, and learn from it...


- georgestrings
 
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