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Discussion Starter #1
Another thread brought up the issue of "Made in USA". Which prompted me to do a little net research...


"For a "Made in USA" claim to be accurate, all significant parts, processing and labor that go into the product must be of U.S. origin. Products should not contain any - or only negligible - foreign content. "
http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/alerts/usaalrt.htm


Aluminum June 2003 figures
461 out of 1804 1000s of metric tons
461 figure split between USA and Canada
http://www.world-aluminium.org/iai/stats/150.html


"Bauxite consists of 45-60% aluminum oxide, 12-30% water, and various other impurities. Bauxite is typically mined in open-pits and either processed into alumina near the mining operation, or shipped to smelting markets around the world for processing. Less than 1% of aluminum in the U.S. comes from domestic bauxite. Major bauxite producing countries include Australia, Guinea, Brazil, Jamaica, and the former republics of the U.S.S.R. " ... "However, only about half of the alumina supplies in the U.S. are refined domestically."
http://www.energysolutionscenter.org/HeatTreat/MetalsAdvisor/aluminum/mining_and_primary_processing/mining_and_primary_process_description.htm


From the above data (if correct), it is apparent that virtually no aluminum (less than 1%) in mined in the US, less than 50% is refined in the US...so...

How can any manufacturer of archery products that consist largely of aluminum...bow risers, releases, sights, arrows...make the claim of "Made in USA"?

I'm certainly not an attorney, but my layman interpretation of "products should not contain any - or only negligible - foreign content." appears to make the "Made in USA" claim virtually impossible for most manufacturers of aluminum based products to make. Am I missing something?
 

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The company I work for, has several government contracts which require all products to be made in the United States. However knowing the processing problems with aluminum they allow us to use material which is produced with imported ingots, as long as the material is value added in the United States. All other material such as steel, must be ore or scrap to finished product in the US.
 

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A large amount of the aluminum used in the US & Canada is processed in Quebec @ a plant owned by Alcan. The bauxite is mined in South America and then refined at the plant in Chicoutimi. The country of origin is based on where the product is finished NOT where the raw materials came from. After all, the hat made in China - would quite possibly be made in the USA if it were based on the source of the raw materials.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Russ,

"The country of origin is based on where the product is finished NOT where the raw materials came from."

So if I have a hat made in China, but it is shipped to the US in pieces and "assembled"...sew on the bill, add logos, etc., then it's "made in USA" ? :) It seems odd that it shouldn't matter where the bulk of the material for the product comes from or where the marority of the assembly/manufacturing occurs.

Toyota pickups used to be shiped to the US without beds. I think this was so they could dodge taxes for importing finished goods. The final assembly occured in the US, but I wouldn't consider them "made in USA".

There are all kinds of creative ways to make something somewhere else and assemble it here. Made in USA should be everything from raw material to finished product; otherwise, the phrase kind of loses its meaning.
 

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Made in USA should be everything from raw material to finished product; otherwise, the phrase kind of loses its meaning.
I would venture to say that you therefore do not own one single complex item (something with 10 or more components) that meets your personal criterion for made in USA.

As for aluminum, the bar stock used in Hoyt recurve risers and compound pockets comes from the Alcoa plant in Spanish Fork, UT, that which is used in compounds comes from another Alcoa plant in California, and the plate stock for things like cams comes from a Kaiser Aluminum plant in California. (You would have to ask Alcoa exactly where their raw ingots come from, if you do, please let us know.)

I have seen some rather pointless posts here but the one about the origin of hats is just ...amazing.
 
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LMAO...

...and wasn't it the Chinese that came up with the slogan:...

...MADE IN THE USA:D ...

...good stuff...very good stuff:p ...

>>>---DD--->;)

...I "think" I was MADE IN THE USA...but now I am not sure...
 

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Then some houses in the USA are made in Canada? Last time I checked it was still American carpenters building the house, irregardless of where the lumber comes from.

Really, this is a soapbox thread if there every was one. The subject is far more complicated than it appears.
 
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RUSS...

Really, this is a soapbox thread if there every was one. The subject is far more complicated than it appears. [/B][/QUOTE]

...ONLY for those that do not understand it!!;) ...

>>>---DD--->:)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My, you guys are sensitive. The point I'm trying to make is that the term "made in USA" is overused and sometimes mis-used.

"Are raw materials included in the evaluation of whether a product is "all or virtually all" made in the U.S.?
It depends on how much of the product’s cost the raw materials make up and how far removed from the finished product they are.
Example: If the gold in a gold ring is imported, an unqualified Made in USA claim for the ring is deceptive. That’s because of the significant value the gold is likely to represent relative to the finished product, and because the gold — an integral component — is only one step back from the finished article. By contrast, consider the plastic in the plastic case of a clock radio otherwise made in the U.S. of U.S.-made components. If the plastic case was made from imported petroleum, a Made in USA claim is likely to be appropriate because the petroleum is far enough removed from the finished product, and is an insignificant part of it as well."
http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/buspubs/madeusa.htm

So, if aluminum is refined in the US, then it appears that products made from that refined material can be labeled "made in USA". Kudos to Hoyt for using American refined aluminum. gt, I wasn't trying to single out any particular bow company, but I'm glad you presented the facts as they relate to Hoyt.

Are all archery parts makers buying their refined aluminum from Alcoa? Somehow I doubt it. I'm sure there are those that purchase the least expensive raw material available...stuff not refined in the USA...China maybe? ;-) If they are doing so, this doesn't seem to fit with the "far enough removed from the finished product" definition.

Am I being nit-picky. Yeah. That's the whole point. :)
 

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PSI, it's a pretty safe bet that most of the aluminum being used by any manufacturer in North America is being produced by Alcoa or Alcan. Which means in all likelyhood the aluminum ingots will be sourced from the nearest facility.
 

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I agree with you russ.


Alcan or Alcoa aluminum will most likely be the only aluminum used.It is the best and is readily available and there isn't any reason for a company to take a chance with something as important as a riser breaking.


I know some got the impression on the other thread that I was suggesting 100% American made products only.That wasn't my intention and not my belief.



I just feel that the situation with China in this point in time needs to be addresed.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Alcoa only has 1 refinery and 8 smelters in the US...
http://www.alcoa.com/ingot/en/market_map.asp?lc=7&continent=North_America
...and many more world wide.

Balco, Mitsubish, and Magna are other sources of refined aluminum; just to name a couple that popped off the top of a Google search.

Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. The 11smelters east of the Mississippi River accounted for 77% of the production; whereas the remaining 12 smelters, whichincluded the 10 Pacific Northwest smelters, accounted for only 23%. Based upon published market prices, the value ofprimary metal production was $4 billion in 2001. Aluminum consumption, by an estimated 25,000 firms, was centeredin the East Central United States. Transportation accounted for an estimated 35% of domestic consumption in 2001;packaging, 25%; building, 15%; consumer durables, 8%; electrical, 7%; and other, 10%.
http://216.239.57.104/search?q=cache:I-hSrg5axG0J:minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/aluminum/050302.pdf+"aluminum+imports"&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

Salient Statistics—United States Production dropped from 3606K tons in 1997 to 2600K tons in 2001...or almost 30%. This may be due to the downturn in the US economy, but if not, the aluminum is being refined outside the US.

Alcoa is starting a joint venture in China...
http://www.alcoa.com/ingot/en/china/strat_overview.asp
...and once this operation gets started, who's to say that US operations won't be impacted further or shut down completely?

Alcoa is already being impacted in the US...

"They point out that the U.S. continues to decline as a producer of prime metal, due primarily to high energy costs. At the same time, aluminum demand is growing slowly. Thus, the U.S. is becoming more dependent on other sources of metal, such as ingot imports and locally generated scrap. As an example of the
continuing pressure on U.S. aluminum companies, Alcoa (Pittsburgh) says it will cut 8,000 jobs and sell several American subsidiaries. Alcoa lost $ 223 million in the fourth quarter of last year."
http://www.swa.org/PDF/mrkt_review0103.pdf

US companies import a lot of their "raw ingots" mostly from Canada and Russia so Alcoa isn't making 100% of the material used domestically...

"Canada accounted for about 60% of U.S. imports of ingot and between 55% and 60% of both imported mill products and scrap. Russia remained second only to Canada as a major shipper of aluminum materials to the United States. "
http://e-mj.com/ar/mining_aluminum_2/index.htm

The plant gt mentioned in UT isn't a smelting or refining plant...
https://www.alcoa.com/locations/alcoa_location/en/home.asp?code=26
...it's a fabrication location. It takes the raw material and forms extrusions..rods, bars, plates, etc.

This link...
http://www.aluminum-extrusions.net/pg2.htm
...is a list of other extrusion plants located in the US. It may be a complete list of plants, and then again, there may be others.
 
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