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I want to start making my own arrows and am looking at the Bitzenburger Dial-O-Fletch. I am a complete novice at this. First of all, I don't know if I want/need the straight or right helical model. I shoot Axis arrows now with Blazer vanes. I believe there is some slight helical to them. How much helical can you/should you get with Blazers? Second, what's the best adhesive for Blazers? Then there is the wrap/no wrap issue. If I use them do I use a different adhesive than if I do not? My current arrows were dipped, but I doubt I'll be doing that. Finally, what about cleaning out the shaft for the inserts, do I need stuff for that? Like I said, have never done it before and am not having much luck finding instructions. If someone has time and could spell it out for me step by step I would really appreciate it.
Thanks.
 

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P&Y137 said:
I want to start making my own arrows and am looking at the Bitzenburger Dial-O-Fletch. I am a complete novice at this. First of all, I don't know if I want/need the straight or right helical model. I shoot Axis arrows now with Blazer vanes. I believe there is some slight helical to them. How much helical can you/should you get with Blazers? Second, what's the best adhesive for Blazers? Then there is the wrap/no wrap issue. If I use them do I use a different adhesive than if I do not? My current arrows were dipped, but I doubt I'll be doing that. Finally, what about cleaning out the shaft for the inserts, do I need stuff for that? Like I said, have never done it before and am not having much luck finding instructions. If someone has time and could spell it out for me step by step I would really appreciate it.
Thanks.
You will need to build or purchase an arrow saw.

You will need a fletching jig, and the Bitz is an excellent choice.

A bottle of 90% isopropyl alcohol and a paper napkin is nice for removing finger oil off the shaft. Yes, the oil in your fingers is enough to interfere with adhesion. Do not touch the vanes with your hands or even feathers. Just shake them out of the bag onto the table. Use a pencil to guide the feather or vane to the edge of the table. Then, use the clamp to grab the vane or feather.

Arrow wraps make the adhesion process much easier for feathers or vanes.

You can get a vane to stick to a carbon or aluminum shaft, but the shaft must be cleaned with the alcohol and paper napkin wipe, and you must never touch the base of the vane or feather.


I used an angle grinder and a grinding wheel for cutting stainless steel.










You can purchase an Apple Arrow Saw, which does the same thing as the angle grinder, namely you can use two hands to spin the arrow to make a shallow scoring cut through the top layers of the arrow, before completing the cut.

Some folks use the mini-chop saw on Harbor Freight.


After the shaft is cut,
you need to rinse with water to get all the carbon dust out of the interior of the shaft.

Flick the shaft sharply downward to get most of the water out.
You could even use a Q-Tip or stuff a paper napkin to soak up
any excess water.



You will need some hot melt glue
for gluing target points or inserts.

I like to use the CDM low temp hot melt glue.
http://www.lancasterarchery.com/sho...=2534&osCsid=37d9b2b58ce01ec56c4372845a9f9ff3


24-hour epoxy also works very well for gluing inserts.



A straight jig will work just fine for the blazers.

A helical jig will curl the base of the vane around the outside diameter
of the shaft. These clamps come in right helical or left helical.

The base of the helical clamp looks like a "S-curve".
The front tip and back tip of the clamp are lower
and the middle of the clamp is higher
when you look from the side.

Offset
refers to the front edge of the vane is not
on the centerline of the arrow shaft.

So, a straight right offset vane installation,
means you are using a straight clamp...
and the front of the vane is to the right of the arrow shaft centerline
and the rear of the vane is either right on the centerline
or
the rear of the vane is a little left of the centerline.


Whatever glue you use
(Goat Tuff)
or
(LocTite Super Glue Gel)
or
(some other favorite brand)

make sure you get a continuous bead of glue on the base of the vane.


Put the vane into the clamp,
by maneuvering the vane to the edge of the work table
using a pencil and then use the clamp
to grab the vane.

Use the pencil to maneuver the vane towards the back end of the clamp.

The Bitz Clamp has marks on the bottom edge of the clamp
for reference points.

Pick a reference mark for your rear spacing from the back end of the vane
to the nock. You might like 3 marks or 4 marks from the end. Put a pencil mark on your favorite reference mark on the clamp.

Turn the clamp upside down on the work table.

Now, lay an even bead of your favorite glue on the base of the vane.
You may need a desk lamp to shine onto the base of the vane
to look for the reflection on the bead of glue, to make sure you have ZERO gaps on the bead of glue.

Make sure you have a bead of glue especially on the front edge of the vane,
and
the rear edge of the vane.

I will sometimes put an extra dab of glue on the front corner of the base of the vane
and
the rear corner of the base of the vane.

Put the clamp onto the magnets
1/4-inch above the arrow shaft.

Slide the clamp until the rear edge of the clamp
hits the receiver at the bottom of the Bitz frame.

Now, slide the clamp down onto the arrow shaft.

Fingertips along the top edge of the clamp.

Two thumbs under the arrow shaft.

Squeeze gently AND evenly so that you see the glue
squeeze out from under the vane base.

HOLD this squeeze for 20 seconds if you use
Super Glue Gel or any other cyanoacrylate type adhesive.

Release your fingers and allow the clamp to sit there
for the next 90 seconds.

If you wish, you can use a paper napkin
to cleanup the squeeze out while you are waiting.

After 90 seconds, squeeze the clamp lever
AND
rotate the receiver knob to rotate the arrow vane away from the clamp.

When the vane is safely rotated away,
now remove the clamp off the magnet.
 

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I would add:

1. Clean inside of arrow where inserts and / or bushing will go, if you are gluing.
2. Some use a tool made up of sandpaper on a rod and in a drill. Insert and spin to clean up the inside. Then clean with the alcohol.
3. I like epoxy with carbon
4. Like N&B said on dabs of glue on edges... but I recommend always putting a small dab of glue on the leading edge of the feathers or vanes. This helps them resist being torn off.
5. I recommend use of nock bushing or pin bushings. If you use weight, do not glue in but use cellophane to “bind” them in. This is so you can remove to add/ remove weight.
6. Axis are small dia. so do not go nuts with large offsets, mimic what the factory does as this works fine.
7. Sawing: Do not force and rotate. At first you can get a proshop to cut them for you I think.
8. Get a good scale that measure about up to 600 to 1,000 grains, and use that once you get going.. At first you do not REALLY need, but once you get anal… you will.
9. Go to, “the archer’s friend” web site. They did have a good how to on arrows.
10. By the way, the archer’s friend has pretty good prices as well as great information for the new archer.
11. Also go to Gold tip, Easton, and Carbon Express web sites.. Easton has a great tech manual. Also read tips.
12. Some of the feather makers and blazer have some information as well.

BY the way.. I use a Jo Ann.. There are threads here on AT on tweaking it to get the most out of it.
 
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