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i am hoping to be able to go deer hunting next season if i can find a promising spot to hunt at. I hear about people having done there homework online and mapping out an area through google maps. How? I would guess you factor in all the main survival necessities from a biological perspective (water,shelter,food) so do you just look for an area that has all of the following or is there any tips that i am missing out on? Any feed back would be great. You guess are awesome so i know that you guys know your stuff so any pointers, tips, or tricks you can give me would be great.
 

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I look at several things.
- are there nearby trails? Trails are bad imo. Hikers and horse riders = more people.
- Habitat. I look for feed, water and cover.
- Terrain. Is it overly steep, are there rock bluffs. Does it look like somewhere elk would be.

I switch back between topo and aerial. There's better ways to do this than Google Earth. Try Caltopo.com lots of layers you can add to your map. And it's easy to transfer way points and routes to your gps
 

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faller downer
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Topo maps are a must no doubt but google maps IMO is a very usful tool not to be over looked. For me it is hard to visualize places that I have never been . I like to feel as I have been somewhere before even if I have not and GM helps me in that manner.

Never can have too much info IMO
 

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Topo maps are a must no doubt but google maps IMO is a very usful tool not to be over looked. For me it is hard to visualize places that I have never been . I like to feel as I have been somewhere before even if I have not and GM helps me in that manner.

Never can have too much info IMO
Yep agreed. The nice thing about Caltopo.com, you can switch from Google Satellite to Topo, or you can do a Hybrid and add Semi-transparent contour lines over the Google maps along with extra details like Peak names, lake names, creeks, etc. Some other cool layers to add are active fires or gradient slope shading (I only use thing if I am planning a summit), but it REALLY does a much better job of showing how steep a hill is compared to topo.

If you can't tell, I really love that website :)
 

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I used google earth on my PC and did scouting of ridgelines and meadows for an elk hunt this year by it. I had the 'general' area where I/We was going to be and I marked/named a bunch of the meadows on google earth and got their GPS coordinates.

I then put those coordinates into my GPS as 'way points' so I would be able to find them and know where they are. I also printed out the google maps onto a hard paper for a hard copy with the names of my meadows on them. One thing to do though is when you 'mark' them on your GPS find some way to identify these 'marks/waypoints' as ones you have pulled off of google earth.

Unsure if this is what your asking but thats how I used GoogleEarth. I also would hook up my laptop to my TV to get a bigger image of it too. That can be nice when your planning on where to go with other people.
 

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I used google earth on my PC and did scouting of ridgelines and meadows for an elk hunt this year by it. I had the 'general' area where I/We was going to be and I marked/named a bunch of the meadows on google earth and got their GPS coordinates.

I then put those coordinates into my GPS as 'way points' so I would be able to find them and know where they are. I also printed out the google maps onto a hard paper for a hard copy with the names of my meadows on them. One thing to do though is when you 'mark' them on your GPS find some way to identify these 'marks/waypoints' as ones you have pulled off of google earth.

Unsure if this is what your asking but thats how I used GoogleEarth. I also would hook up my laptop to my TV to get a bigger image of it too. That can be nice when your planning on where to go with other people.
Just a tip for you.......It's been a while, but when I used to transfer GE waypoints to GPS I would use a free program called GPS Babel. This way you can transfer a bunch of waypoints and tracks (routes) all at once (instead of typing in the coordinates). I won't go into detail, but if you download the program you'll see it's really easy to transfer the KML/KMZ GE files to GPX for your GPS.
And there may be an easier way now too that I don't know of.

http://www.gpsbabel.org/
 

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Corripe Cervisiam
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I don't want to give out too much on a public forum-grin- but suffice it to say, many of the areas I hunt for the first time....I feel like I have already been there through GE.
 

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1 more tip - different imagery sources. Google has been pretty good about updating their imagery files. But sometimes you'll come across an area that has an old image and is fuzzy. If that's the case, try Bing aerials. They have some really good high resolution imagery of SOME places. And sometimes Google will have a better image, you just never know until you look at both. Here's an example (zoomed way in) of a bing image compared to an Google Earth image of the same meadow. Area names have been censored :)

Bing...
Green Biome Map Aerial photography Forest


Google.....
Green Nature Natural environment Tree Biome
 

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Thanks for the heads-up Elk.Addict! I never heard of Bing aerial (I knew of their search engine, but never thought to see if they had maps), so I just tried it and it had much better photos of the rural areas I hunt in the midwest!

-WRM
 

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Corripe Cervisiam
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1 more tip -bing aerials
That is a good tip.
It seems to me the Google stuff has been less in focus in the last year or two since they upgraded software and started the Google pay program [which is crystal clear]- anyone shocked?
 
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