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Discussion Starter #1
I was reading another thread and was curious. Does anyone know if these large companies (Mathews, Hoyt, etc.) make the limbs in pairs to match? Do they mass produce top limbs and bottom limbs separately in large batches?

I am just curious. If they mass produce them do they try to match them up by reflex? If so does it really matter if you replace just one?

I would think the company that spends the most time pairing up limbs would pay greater attention to details with the rest of the bow as well and would consequently makes the best product.

If anyone has facts I would be greatly interested.
 

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MARTIN LIMBS A#1

As far as I've ever known, the standard practice in the archery industry has always been to replace limbs on a bow a pair at a time. That being said I've owned over 150 top of the line compounds and can say there are significant differences in limb design and quality from one manufacturer to another. Not all limbs are anywhere near the same. For example, Martin Archery to the best of my knowledge has a 12 3/4", 14", 16", and a 17" XRG limb. Now couple that with the fact that there are 15 different deflection numbers(0-14), in Light, Medium , and Heavy. Limbs deflections are then measured to the pound and marked with a representative number and letter designation. For eaxmple on a Scepter 3 a matched set of number 6M's might yield 60#, 6H- 61#, etc. That's about 135 different limb sizes and deflections, coupled with the fact that they are offered in carbon dipped finish, as well as Mossy Oak and Advantage Timber. I am confident that with Martin I know I'm getting the best limbs available. Having matched limbs on a bow can alleviate a lot of tuning headaches in the long run. As a result, Martin can offer its' customers a bow with a peak weight exactly to the desired specification. Some companies have been known to only offer bows in peak weights in ten pound increments, with limbs varying as much as two or three pounds from limb to limb. You can imagine what happens to the shooting qualities of a bow if you were to mix a limb three pounds heavy with one that's three pounds light. It happens more frequently than most people realize. Granted, it can still be tuned and then shot accurately, but the extra time and consideration taken to get good results could be avoided just by having a matched set of limbs in the first place. The easiest way to demonstrate a matched set of limbs is simply to bottom the limbs out and measure the tiller. Compare top and bottom measurements and there shouldn't be more than about 1/16"-1/8" of variance. Every once and a while you'll be very surprised at what some manufacturer's deem "matched".
 

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Jim, very well stated! My Hoyt bottomed out and was only off on tiller about a 16th, then I set it even. I have not seen a number on my limbs. Are they under the limb pockets? I have never had the need to take a limb off any of our bows before.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks. WOW. I did not know that some manufacturers went to such length to match limbs. That is incredible. With the recent post on here about not sending a set of matched limbs to replace a broken one I might reconsider the purchase of my next bow.

You guys rock
 

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Some manufacturers build limbs in the form of a minature bow and then cut them apart at the but end. Likely this is a carry over of stick bow manufacture of one piece bows.

I do not think it matters if limbs are made as above or in single limb presses or even side by side out of a blank. As long as all limbs of a spine rating are of an identical component stack, it does not matter if a pair of limbs are kept together from beginning to end, or not.

The important issue is that the spine be closely matched to a specified deflection differential. Close but not exact because I do think that the top limb should be a little weaker spined, slightly greater deflection.

It would be great if all bows and all sets of limbs did indeed have a differential of 1/16 to 1/8.
 

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fs560, I'm assuming your talking about limb deflection
rates.. and I respectfully disagree with your statements..
One would have to consider also what type of cam system(1 or 2
cam, or hybrid)...
I would not want my deflection rates to vary more than
1/16", but you state upwards of 1/8" is desirable...

I say the closer to zero, the better... fine tuning of a bow
for that elusive "sweet spot" can be achieved through
limb bolt/slight tiller adjustment, not in limb deflection rates..
I want my limbs to be matched....then I can fine tune the
bow from there(depending on cam system and finger or
release shooter)...

The manufacturer does not know what type of shooter
a prospective customer is, so it's always best to get
a bow with a matched pair of limbs(deflection close to
zero)...
 
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