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Discussion Starter #1
Would any of the pros out there be willing to become mentors for some of us newer shooters who'd like to get serious about archery and eventually go pro?

We can ask questions here on AT but sometimes we get a lot of contradictory information. The kind of help I'd be looking for is answering a few questions about equipment and a LOT of questions about how to compete. What to bring to a competition. Lots of discussions about how a particular tournament went or even how a practice session went. I'm talking about a relationship to help a newer archer over many of the problems, especially mental problems, related to working towards becoming a winning archer.

What do you think?
 

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baldmountain. The thing about archery is that there is no wrong way to do anything. The best way to learn things in archery is by trial and error. What works for one may not work for another. That is why there are soooo many different answers. Pros have many different theories on things. How do you think the pros got so good? They tried everything and found what works best. Though I would take a pros advise over an amature. answers will vary no matter who you talk to. What you want is a coach, a single person to tell you want to do and only one way to do it. If taking a single persons advice will help YOU better mentaly, go right ahead!
 

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cousin dave

geoff - dave cousins offers private and group lessons of 20. I plan to fly to Maine in early November for some private lessons with dave. He will also come to you. It's not cheap but you get what you pay for.

Currently, I am developing Dave's website and helping him with his marketing.

PM me if you want contact information.

Good shooting.

ox
 
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OXYCLEAN...

...timing is PERFECT!!...take a month off prior to going to see CUZ...fly into SBN Regional and I'll pick you up...it's just 10 minutes from my crib:cool: ...

...we will "work" on your form ahead of time:cool: ...CUZ will be ever so pleased with the results:cool: ...

...and I'll have the help I'm looking for about then:cool: ...OOPS...I mean...I'll have the MENTORING I need from you for that "pre-CUZ" period of time:cool: ...

...PM me on the arrival time at SBN so we can hook up:cool: ...

>>>---DD--->;)

PS...this is going to be so>>>--->:cool:
 

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Brad Rega said:
The thing about archery is that there is no wrong way to do anything. The best way to learn things in archery is by trial and error. What works for one may not work for another. That is why there are soooo many different answers.
I fear that the Korean Olympic coaches would not agree with even one of your (above) statements. :)

kgk
 

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I agree

I must agree. There is more than one way to do most anything but usually a best way. I work for a japanese automobile manufacturer and we constantly strive to duplicate the same motion, by different sized people with different strengths and weaknesses. Kaizen or continuous improvements are the bedrock of their philosophy and it's hard to argue with success. The same can be said for the Korean's. BTW we just received our exchange student from Korea wonder if she can help me???? 3DFEVR.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
There is more to being a mentor than just teaching. A large part of being successful is having the right mental attitude. Here's an example. I've never shot a 300 round. Last night I setup a NFAA 5 spot target at 20 yards and decided to shoot for score. I didn't have time to shoot 60 arrows but I did have time for 30. After 5 ends I had scored a 125 with 19Xs. I said to myself, "Shooting 300 is easy. Why do people fret about shooting trying to shoot 300. I'm practically half way there. The sun's in my eyes and the mosquitos are biting and the arrows are still going into the center. This is easy." The very next arrow was a 3. Doh! In archery it is so easy to start thinking about what you are doing, get excited about the scrore you are shooting, second guess your form and/or equipment, etc. and then proceed to screw up.

This is the kind of thing you'd discuss with a mentor. They'd be able to give you tools to not fall into those traps. Ways to keep from getting excited about a good score or to keep from second guessing your form and/or equipement.

Yes there will be questions about equipment and form, but more importantly the mentor is a sympathetic sholder. Someone who has worked through all these issues and knows how to help.

Or am I over thinking all this?
 

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I agree with Brad, somewhat... On some points there are very different schools of thought in archery, while on others there is consensus. Archery isn’t an exact science, and while there may be a common wisdom shared by many, there are also many variations.

Take for example, aiming. While no one would argue against one half of the shot being subconscious, the majority would tell you to aim hard and let the shot happen subconsciously, but some of the best archers and coaches in the world teach/do just the opposite.
 

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baldmountain said:
...Last night I setup a NFAA 5 spot target at 20 yards and decided to shoot for score....

...This is easy." The very next arrow was a 3. Doh!
BM - The NFAA 5 spot scores 5, 4, not 5, 4, 3...

Also, I've experienced bad things when score comes to mind... It's like Murphy's Law.
 
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