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I'm new to shooting a bow. I'm not doing to bad so far, groups are fairly good out to 20yards but I seem to be having a problem with misfiring.
I'm shooting a mission craze LH 29.5 / 50#... I'm pretty comfortable with those settings. I am using a tru ball stinger release.
I can shoot the first 5 or 6 shots perfectly ( no misfire) then all of the sudden I misfire... I'll take another shot fine then... Misfire again .... Sometimes it will continue like that for 3 or 4 shots and sometimes it happens constantly.... Till i give up for the day.
I'm confident that I am not hitting the release.... I keep my fingers bent behind the trigger... I want to question the release itself but I've replaced it 3 times now... The first was a .44 caliper and then 2 tru ball stingers...
I'm wondering if it's fatigue that is making me torque the release but I don't feel fatigued. or if maybe my draw needs to be lengthened another .5"....(I,'m 6'2" and have long arms)..... These are just ideas that have popped in my head... I really don't know... And probably way off
I know it would be difficult to tell me with out seeing a video of what I'm doing but any tips or ideas to help me correct my missfiring would be great!!!! It's already cost me 6 arrows in 3 months!!
 

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A good coach would be the best option, but you might be able to figure out the problem yourself.

Get close to a big blank bale. 2 to 3 yards at most. Don't put up a target. Shoot the bale concentrating on what is going on with your release. (concentration is what the mind sees)

When the misfires occur, you should be able to tell if it's something you are doing wrong or if it is a problem with the release.

Go to the Tru Ball website and download the instructions for adjusting the Stinger. Be sure that you adjust it so that it is not sensitive. Hair triggers very often lead to target panic and you really don't want to go there. If you have a means to measure it, set it for 3 to 4 pounds.

Also adjust the length of the barrel so that you can rest the second joint of your index finger on the trigger without setting it off. The tip of your index finger is more sensitive and often leads to anticipation that leads to target panic.

Check the the release at full draw. The jaws shouldn't be touching, but there should only be a very small distance between them. No more than the thickness of a dollar bill folded a couple of times. When doing this be sure an arrow is loaded and you are pointing in a safe direction. A misfire without an arrow is a dry fire and that does bad things to your bow.

One other thing, if you use a D-loop is to check the thickness of the rope. Most caliper releases need the thickest rope that you can find. At least 2 mm and thicker is better. The wider the gap between the jaws, the thicker the D-loop needs to be.

Let us know what you work out,
Allen
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Allen.
I'll try your suggestions just as soon as my new arrows arrive. I'll post with the results after... in the mean time I will look into adjusting my release.
 

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I've only shot that bow one or two times and I don't remember just how it feels so take this for what it is worth. It could be your form. If I am reading your post correctly and understanding what you mean by "misfire". I do it too. First of all when you are at full draw and ready to touch you release make sure your finger is in the proper place and don't let the trigger touch the tip of your finger. Make sure it's behind your first joint and your fingers are relaxed.
While you are at full draw make sure your shoulders and stance are correct and you are holding with your back muscles. Do not let your shoulder of your holding arm come forward. If your bow has a solid back wall and you come forward with your shoulder, it could cause you to release your arrow. It makes it worse when your finger is placed improperly on the trigger too. It's called "creep" (the shoulder coming forward). Some bows allow for a bit of creep and others will take right off on you. My Old Glory allows for a bit of creep but it also causes me to shoot bad. My Specialist does not allow for creep because it has a very solid back wall. It also has fairly aggressive cams so if you come forward with your shoulder the bow will take off.
That said, it could be several other things. It's just one thing that won't cost you anything to try.
 
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