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Isaiah 6:8
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so i saw some people talking about this on another thread but didn't want to divert away from the original content. in theory i get why more weight equals less pin float but more weight increases the load on the bow arm and wouldnt that create some pin float? seems like a lighter bow would be easier to hold still since you're not holding up more weight but i get that more weight would resist any kind of torque or movement. just need some help figuring this one out
 

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More weight does not necessarily reduce movement. Pulling too many lbs. and holding too many lbs. will work against reducing pin movement.
Pull a comfortable weight that has a holding weight you can hold with the least amount of pin movement, Then at the moment of executing your shot, increase the holding weight ever so slightly by pushing your pin at the center of your target while pulling your release until it fires. If you do it right you will see the pin almost set still at the moment of release. Learn to do this exactly the same every time. I think you will be pleased with the results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
More weight does not necessarily reduce movement. Pulling too many lbs. and holding too many lbs. will work against reducing pin movement.
Pull a comfortable weight that has a holding weight you can hold with the least amount of pin movement, Then at the moment of executing your shot, increase the holding weight ever so slightly by pushing your pin at the center of your target while pulling your release until it fires. If you do it right you will see the pin almost set still at the moment of release. Learn to do this exactly the same every time. I think you will be pleased with the results.
ill give it a try this afternoon!
 

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There’s a perfect medium for everyone. For Mike Schloesser, his bow probably weighs 20 pounds with all of the weight he shoots. However Jesse broadwater is shooting I think 3oz up front, and maybe 5 in the back. Just have to play with them


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Pin float is subject to a number of factors.
Ideal setup to the archer in question include but are not limited to,
Mass of the final setup including all accessories,
Stabilizer system setup, peep to sight matching,
CORRECT hold weight and ideal draw length.

The best float/sight picture for you is determined by intelligent experimentation.
Don't for get about form, conditioning and practice.

DK
 

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there isn't any one particular aspect that affects pin flow. it's the right combination of exactly correct draw length , holding weight, stab weight, stab weight distribution, stab length, string angle, anchor point, shooter's form, sight picture and relative condition both physical and mental on any given day. the later two being the reason we can be steady as a rock today and all over the place tomorrow. really,... every aspect of the shot affects pin float. that's why there is so much written about it.
 

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Isaiah 6:8
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
good information here guys, thanks
 

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Mass weight is what helps with pin float, look at a target rifle & a sporting field rifle. What is the weight difference between the 2??
 

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In regards to weight, I would agree that similar sports have it figured out but it is totally different for every shooter. A lighter bow for me gets too much “correction” when I try to float the pin. More weight and I can slow that way down but only to a certain point. Too much weight and it feels like the bow won’t move at all. Like others have said, bow weight is only a small factor in the overall scheme. Find the most comfortable and efficient system for your personal preference that you can and you’ll be miles ahead.
 

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Mass weight is what helps with pin float, look at a target rifle & a sporting field rifle. What is the weight difference between the 2??
more to it than just mass weight,..... completely different stock geometry between a sporting rifle and a target rifle, stock fit, and balance point have huge inputs to how steady a rifle holds. look at a typical target rifle,...the stock is full of adjustable sections that move to accommodate different physical sizes and shapes. balance point can be adjusted fore and aft with weights.
 

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Reckoning 35 for 3D, RealmX for hunt, PSE SupraFocusXL for spot . Axcel, ARC release, Victory.
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She say's it pretty well.... it's not about weight, it's not about stabilisation only, and for shure it's not same for everyone.

 

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I'm relatively new to shooting "open class" set ups. (I'm in my second season)

What I seem to be noticing is as my bow arm gets stronger, I need to add weight to get the pin to "quiet" down. (seems like every few months)

When I first moved on from Hunter Class, I shot a 27" long bar with nothing and 1 oz on the 12" back bar. I 've incrementally made changes to bar angles and weights to where I am now 27"(2oz)/12"(50z) with an 8* down disconnect on my 3D bow.

Everytime I make these changes, the bow holds better and my scores go up for a few months. I assume this is normal for someone in my position and eventually, I'll get to that magic spot and won't have to mess with my bars and weights as much.
 
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