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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello to all,

I am 3 weeks into this love affair and am having a little soreness in my bow shoulder. An archer friend (who actually IS an archer) says my form looks pretty decent so far and that I have "found" a good anchor for me and a somewhat smooth release (now to see if I can repeat it it every time!?!). I am shooting a 40# one piece recurve.

Anyway, I have over done it and shot too much too soon = soreness in bow shoulder. This soreneness goes away after a days rest but I want to prevent further complications. However, I also notice that I start drawing with both arms bent, raise up as I am pushing AND pulling. After watching shot of the day vids on here and countless trad archers online... I see that many raise the bow having already extended bow arm and primarily PULL with string arm (really the back muscles I'm sure).

Do any of you think that my soreness is perhaps being also caused by working my bow shoulder unnecessarily (pushing too much)? Is this a defect/error with my draw form?

I have decided to approach this like running from here on in - trying to gradually increase number of arrows slowly over time, then dropping back, then increasing, etc...

Thank for your thoughts,

Jiva
 

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Jiva -

Most common and most efficient may not be the same thing especially in the "trad" community.
However, even in the Olympic world, you will see a number of "variations on a theme".

For new / learning shooters, the most efficient way to draw the bow is with the bow arm full extended, but not locked and effectively pre-aimed at the target. The string is then drawn directly back to anchor. It requires the least amount of work and therefore provides the most consistency.

Viper1 out.
 

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For a lot of new shooters, keeping the bow arm and shoulder set is not mastered well. Loading them before they are raised just makes keeping and holding good, healthy, alignment harder, because you are moving them and loading them at the same time. Adjustments are harder under full load.

If your bow shoulder is getting sore, look for some topics on keeping a low bow shoulder and not "riding" the shoulder up.

Edit to add: For me, I still find the way Viper describes as the most efficient and consistent for my shooting.
 

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Do any of you think that my soreness is perhaps being also caused by working my bow shoulder unnecessarily (pushing too much)?
Possibly. I don't like to think of my bow arm pushing towards the target. I like to think of my bow arm as an I-beam...solid and stable.

Is this a defect/error with my draw form?
Hard to know for sure without seeing a pic or vid of you shooting.

I have decided to approach this like running from here on in - trying to gradually increase number of arrows slowly over time, then dropping back, then increasing, etc...
Now that's a wise choice! :thumbs_up

Strengthening your rotator cuff can help allot.

I personally think it would be easier for a beginner to first learn what a good stable bow arm feels like when its in position while not holding the bow at dull draw. Once that's achieved the archer can try to recreate it at full draw.

What are your archery GOALS?

Ray :shade:
 

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Jiva -

Most common and most efficient may not be the same thing especially in the "trad" community.
However, even in the Olympic world, you will see a number of "variations on a theme".

For new / learning shooters, the most efficient way to draw the bow is with the bow arm full extended, but not locked and effectively pre-aimed at the target. The string is then drawn directly back to anchor. It requires the least amount of work and therefore provides the most consistency.

Viper1 out.
Good stuff

Concentrate on setting your shoulder low

I am no expert but when I am shooting a lot if I keep my bow shoulder low it gets no burn

Its amazing how just setting it low and drawing straight back can help
 

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I know that the hand that draws the string dictates whether your a right or left handed archer. But what is considered your bow shoulder? Shoulder that holds the bow, which seems obvious, or shoulder that draws the string?

Thank you.
 

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I personally place little value on labeling "how I draw my bow"...then again?...I don't know what you would call "how I draw my bow"...I just do it and about the only thing I think I'm certain of?...is all my upper body muscles are used to do so...front...back....the works...and do my best not to even think about it...and just do my best to allow whatever feels natural to occur...because when I allow my mind to consciously get into the mix of what is a physical function?...I usually manage to fudge things up and never do it twice exactly the same way....that said?...

What I have noticed: is this...those sessions that end with me having a sore bow arm shoulder the following morning?...is more often than not a form related matter...where maybe one (or more) of several key elements have gone awry...and sometimes it can have a domino sort of effect such as...

If I allow my grip pressure to raise from low to high?...I've noticed my bow arm shoulder has a tendency to follow it...not good....or?....alignment issues...or?...not getting to full lock/alignment anchor where side pressure/torque is still in my bow arm shoulder...the cure?...I take the pain as an indication that I need to work on my form until "the right way" evolves and becomes ingrained again with a focus on....

Locked, Low & Inside The Bow"

How I get there?...The actual motion of drawing my bow?...is of little concern to me...and the less I concern myself with it?...the smoother and more natural things seem to flow..and all my muscles are invited to that party! :laugh:

But don't listen to me...I'm a low level backyard hack who snap shoots instinctively. :laugh:

But I have a blast doing it! :laugh:

and now back to our normally scheduled technical breakdown of how to draw a bow. :laugh:

because for me? ;)

 

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I too am new to traditional archery, but from years of shooting my compound bow, I will always do exercises to warm up all the areas that I'll be using to draw my trad bow or my compound bows. I have found that if I don't warm up first, I'll always have soreness in my shoulders; and I limit the number of arrows I will shoot in a day to 15 or less. With compound bows, I see that coming to full draw, it is easier on your joints not so with traditional bows (at least my joints).
 

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I'm 55 and if I shoot too much, it hurts. I often do shoot too much but work hurts too! However, I have gotten my bow arm out of alignment (when trying to make certain it is in alignment) and that's a whole different kind of "hurt". Assuming that you don't have some other injury, my guess is that you're doing something "wrong" with that shoulder.

More specifically, down and back is supposed to be good but getting my bow shoulder too far back is what causes me injury...your mileage may vary. I need to raise my bow arm "naturally" which may not look exactly like somebody else when they raise theirs "naturally". In order to get my whole body in correct alignment, I only need to make certain that I don't move the front end as I'm using the back end to draw the bow...which can happen when I'm fatigued or my string shoulder just gets lazy.

The same holds true whether I swing draw or do it "target style". I tend to think that where you end up is more important than how you get there.

I'm the only archer I teach (I try to help my son and wife) so take this for what it's worth. Sill, my experience is that thinking and then acting accordingly is usually a good thing. LOL
 

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I too am new to traditional archery, but from years of shooting my compound bow, I will always do exercises to warm up all the areas that I'll be using to draw my trad bow or my compound bows. I have found that if I don't warm up first, I'll always have soreness in my shoulders; and I limit the number of arrows I will shoot in a day to 15 or less. With compound bows, I see that coming to full draw, it is easier on your joints not so with traditional bows (at least my joints).
What kind of exercises do you use to warm up? I ask because I've experimented with a few different things with limited success.
 

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Jiva, I suggest what Viper says - begin with setup as bow arm straight and pointed at the target. Your shoulder soreness is probably either from grinding the rotator cuff by moving it while under load and/or from working shoulder muscles to draw the bow. Drawing the bow should be primarily with the back muscles.

Good call giving it a rest and asking for advice. I have seen shoulder problems sideline many archers.
 

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Might as well learn the best way up front. Fita isn't exactly trad but the setup to draw is the same. See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NxvmOPe6Fx4&feature=kp Muscles are gonna ache especially when you first start out but if it's the shoulders and back mostly, that's a cue you're probably on the right track. Arms hurting, you're doing it wrong. Enjoy the pain :)
 
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