Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,666 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone else think that there seems to be more deer wounded with no recovery or very long track jobs with muzzleloaders than other weapons?

Between relatives,friends and co-workers I have a lot of conversations with hunters through out the season many of who are well seasoned hunters but I hear more stories of wounded game during ML season than I do archery (crossbows and vertical bow) and firearm season. I could understand it more back in the day when we used percussion caps and ball and patch but now with in-lines with pellets and sabots etc. they are very accurate.

I am not by any means putting down muzzleloaders or ML hunters but I was wondering if anyone else seems to notice this?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,450 Posts
Does anyone else think that there seems to be more deer wounded with no recovery or very long track jobs with muzzleloaders than other weapons?

Between relatives,friends and co-workers I have a lot of conversations with hunters through out the season many of who are well seasoned hunters but I hear more stories of wounded game during ML season than I do archery (crossbows and vertical bow) and firearm season. I could understand it more back in the day when we used percussion caps and ball and patch but now with in-lines with pellets and sabots etc. they are very accurate.

I am not by any means putting down muzzleloaders or ML hunters but I was wondering if anyone else seems to notice this?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
hunters hurting Hunters grow up
 

·
Tooth, Fang, Claw
Joined
·
6,268 Posts
I've heard that same story about crossdresser bows, not muzzle loaders. Regardless of what weapon system is being used, it's more likely than not the operator, not the weapon/ammo that is used, that causes the wounding of an animal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
I agree with Boykil, and note that the many of the guys I know who own muzzies rarely practice with them and bought cheap ones to begin with. So, they are inherently less accurate with the muzzy than their primary weapon(s). Not good.
 

·
Back down to ground level
Joined
·
16,089 Posts
Muzzleloaders today are very accurate if the time is taken to find the right load for the gun. It is the operators fault, as bowkil said, with any weapon, whether it be from not enough practice or taking a poor shot. I hear a lot of gunshots during all firearm seasons, and see, or see sign of, very few deer being dragged out, if any. Same with bow season. Hear, and read, a lot of stories of lost deer. The accuracy and ease of use of a weapon, from traditional to compounds to crossbows, and muzzleloaders to shotguns to rifles, doesn't matter. The better the weapon, the more reckless they seem to get, expecting the weapon to make up for their lack of judgement. The worse the weapon is, the more they will use it as an excuse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,900 Posts
My experience with them has been great. Have alot of confidence in my setup, but I also took the time to make sure my bullet and powder combo produces good accuracy and it holds its zero.

Like anything, if a guy buys the gun right before opener, bore sights it and runs to the woods results will most likely be bad. Like everything practice makes perfect
 

·
Tooth, Fang, Claw
Joined
·
6,268 Posts
Know the limitations of your weapon system, ammo, and yourself. Practice and become proficient with whatever you're using to take game. Take ONE clean shot and make it count! I don't think that too many so called 'hunters' put forth that amount of time and/or effort. Then complain about the ones that they wounded and/or couldn't recover.

This was a 178 yd heart shot. The deer went maybe 40 yds before dropping dead. T/C .50 cal Pro Hunter ML, 2 T7 Magnum Pellets, T7 primer, 250 gr Shockwave bullet/sabot combo, Leupold 3.5-10 x 42 VXIII scope.

20161117_092946 (2).jpg
20161117_100327 (2).jpg
20150220_175632 (2).jpg

If folks don't want to properly learn the performance of their weapon system, and put in the time and practice, maybe they would be better off finding another activity to occupy their time. I know the animals that are being hunted would appreciate it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,450 Posts
I agree with Boykil, and note that the many of the guys I know who own muzzies rarely practice with them and bought cheap ones to begin with. So, they are inherently less accurate with the muzzy than their primary weapon(s). Not good.
and you obtained this wealth of knowledge where??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Buckeyboy, Thanks for your reply. I have been shooting various muzzleloaders for 20+ years, so maybe I am not as experienced as you? Currently, I shoot an accurized Savage Ml 10II with N120, Barnes Originals, MMP sabots, and Federal primers. I shoot my ML hundreds of times each year at the range. In my muzzleloading (in)experience, the guys I know who own muzzies rarely shoot them, and don't shoot them very well.That lack of proficiency leads directly to poor hunting outcomes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Boykil, I 100% agree with you. Great photos and shooting. That deer was slightly quartering toward you when you shot? That TC Pro Hunter Encore is a great gun. My buddy just picked one up and it is really nice rifle. I also have an older Encore set up as a 20 gauge slug gun and it shoots well.
 

·
Tooth, Fang, Claw
Joined
·
6,268 Posts
Boykil, I 100% agree with you. Great photos and shooting. That deer was slightly quartering toward you when you shot? That TC Pro Hunter Encore is a great gun. My buddy just picked one up and it is really nice rifle. I also have an older Encore set up as a 20 gauge slug gun and it shoots well.
It sure was. Actually, when I first saw him he was with a doe a tad over 300 yds out at the edge of the hay field s/e of me. I was tucked in the hedgerow sitting. My rifle was on a Stoney Point Rapid Pivot Bipod. I got his attention with a few loud grunts (Extinguisher) and he came walking in. I kept my range finders on him as he started walking east to west (I was facing south). Right at 178 yds I did a 'voice grunt'. He stopped completely broad side but turned his shoulders (to the right) towards me. So his body was more of less broad side but chest was quartering towards me. I set the range finders down and got behind the scope. I had my rifle zeroed 2" high at 100 yds so I just put the cross hairs just above the right shoulder and squeezed the trigger. The rest is history. The 250 gr Shockwave center punched the heart and blew up the right shoulder area. Quite a bit of secondary projectile internal damage as well. Inside of 200 yds that rifle is deadly. With the load I'm using I don't think I'd attempt a shot over 200 yds (for ethics reasons).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
35,283 Posts
I could have had many deer in archery season just did not want to shoot a doe with my bow and the bucks I had come by were just not the size I wanted to shoot. So while I had no luck in archery season I shot a doe in rifle season and tonight took my first Flintlock doe will post pictures tomorrow as it was dark by the time I gutted it tagged it and got home. Mines a Flintlock so I know it’s not a long range shooter it’s up to me to get close enough to get a shot I can shoot good to 100 yards good enough to kill a deer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,666 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks to everyone who took time to answer my question and some good info was thrown out there. I thought I made it clear in my original post but will once again reiterate that I have no problems with muzzleloaders as I hunt with them myself but as stated earlier just wanted to get some thoughts on if anyone else seemed to notice what I did.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top