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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I started shooting compound a few months ago, and I got a compound bow with 45 lbs of draw weight. This feels fine, but I'm buying a new bow, and I'm wondering whether I should get a 40-50 lbs or 50-60 lbs bow. My thinking is that I can probably shoot 50 lbs without too much problem, and that I would have a bow to "grow" with. On the other hand, the new bow (hoyt invicta 37) only has a 65% letoff with the svx cams, versus 80% with my current bow, and therefore might feel quite a lot heavier anyhow. Would it be foolish to go for the 50-60 lbs version, or would I regret it later if I go for the 40-50 lbs?
Thanks!
 

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The short answer is yes and no.
The long answer is as follows:

Not necessarily and possibly. The good thing about the bow that bottoms out somewhere near your draw weight is it gives a lot of future-proofing, since as you get stronger you can shoot more and more poundage - a big advantage outdoors for example. The bad thing is if you're overbowed even at the lowest draw weight. Then you have this super expensive bow that you more or less can't shoot. You can struggle with it for a few arrows until you're finally injured and have basically a crappy time when shooting. Not a good investment of that kind of money.

So the other short answer is it depends on if you can handle the bottom weight of the 60lb bow. If you can, the higher poundage bow would probably be a better investment resale-wise also. It's also possible that the 60lb bow might actually adjust a little lower than 50 lbs, but you'd probably have to check with the place you're buying it from....

lee.
 

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If you can increase the draw weight of your current bow to 50 lbs and shoot repeatedly without getting fatigued then I would go with 50-60 lbs bow. If you really struggle at pulling 50 lbs I would get a 40-50 lbs bow.

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The lower let off makes a bigger difference than some people think it does. I shot an 80% let off bow(Medalist 38) with a long valley(had the mod one setting shorter) for 3.5 months, then recently bought a bow with 75%(but math-wise it's closer to 70) let off(Supra Ext) and a MUCH sharper valley. I can shoot the Medalist @61lbs for hours on end without feeling any significant fatigue. The Supra I had to turn down to 57-58lbs to comfortably shoot it for long sessions. I 100%, without a doubt shoot better with the lower let off and sharper valley. I believe it's because the bow doesn't allow me to relax too much while aiming and get sloppy with my form, so it's definitely an advantage in my opinion. That being said shoot your current bow at 50lbs and see how it feels. Personally though I'd go with the 40-50lb limbs. I don't know how much they typically cost for Hoyts, but you can always buy another set of limbs down the road if you really want to up your draw weight.
 

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Really depends on your bowing goals; me for example, the class I compete in has a 45lb max DW, so while I can shoot more I don't have a need to do so; So I normally look for bows with a max of 50lbs. I do always keep one bow in the stable with a heavier DW that I use during the off season, or during long breaks between competitions, for conditioning purposes; I also run heavier than needed stabs on this bow, and shoot it at a lower let-off, when the primary goal is form and function over groups and points.

If I were the OP I would either purchase the new bow at the higher weight if my ultimate goal was to shoot that higher weight, while keeping the current lower-weight bow to shoot as I worked into the heavier draw. Especially if I could twist the cable a couple times and work up from [in this case] the 45 to the 50lb draw. I would also incoporate the higher DW bow slowly into the training regime, but not all at once and not for even complete sessions in the beginning.

Now, if the purchase of the heavier bow was contingent on the sale of the lighter one, I would either wait or perhaps buy an intermediary bow between the two weights to build up with; the desired bow at the desired weight will still be out there, either new or used, six months [or whatever] from now, and you won't take a huge hit on resale of a used bow as you would over a new one you have difficulty getting fully into. Again, really depends on what your current bowing goals are, whether it is reasonable to assume your conditioning/form will actually reach the new bow's potential, and IMO how dedicated you are to good form and joint health over desire [ego] of pulling more weight. If you are going to have difficulty shooting, or getting much beyond, that 50lb, then what is the point of going 60... If in time goals/needs will have you closer to that 60lb upper limit, it becomes a matter of climbing towards it versus jumping blindly into it. Only one who can make that call is you, and and it is a question that only counts if the answer is based on a true and honest evaluation of one's own needs and capabilities.
 

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I would get the 40-50# bow and if in the future you decide you can and or want more draw weight get a set of 50-60# limbs.
 

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Really whatever you can pull and hold comfortably. Can always upgrade later. Buddy had bow he said he was comfortable with but when time came to take shot in woods with his body at a little different angle he couldn't get it done. So do what's most comfortable to you. Obviously benefits at higher draw weight but doesn't beat accuracy and able to hold on point for decent length of time if needed.
 

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I can shoot a 70 lb bow but I love my 40-50 lb triax....whitetail killing machine. I don’t shoot over 30-35 yards but it whacks them. I have it maxed out at about 53 lbs. 29 in draw. Shoot a gold tip hunter usually and a rage Broadhead. Just shot this one a couple days ago. Have killed several big deer with it
 

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I'm guessing you are punching holes in paper at 20 yards with this bow? Get the 40-50, it's all you need!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
To the OP: Have you thought about just buying a set of new limbs for the bow you are shooting?
My goal is not higher draw weight but a new target bow. I just want to make sure the new bow will fit me and last me a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Tanks to everyone for great advice. I think I'm going with the 40-50 lbs option, high draw weight is not important for me in itself. As some of you mentioned, I can always get new limbs later at some point if I need a higher draw weight. I don't want to be overbowed!
 

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Sounds like you decided, but if you have a bow shop locally ask them if you can pull a few to see how the higher poundage feels. You didn’t mention your age or any physical issues. If you’re younger and in good health growing into more poundage is easy. Older and shoulder or other issues maybe not do much.


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Sounds like you decided, but if you have a bow shop locally ask them if you can pull a few to see how the higher poundage feels. You didn’t mention your age or any physical issues. If you’re younger and in good health growing into more poundage is easy. Older and shoulder or other issues maybe not do much.


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This!!

I can shoot 70# but I dont. 60# is plenty for me. Once you get tired accuracy is gone.
Years ago I had a PSE Source that maxed at 50# and that bow was a dream to shoot- and a tack driver.
 

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Take into account your age, health, etc.. Are you in great health and can build up some of those muscles, or are your fairly stable in your phsyique?
 

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If you are purchasing an Invicta why don't you consider the DCX Cam with a 45#-55# draw weight? The draw weight is right for you, the let off is close to what you have now and a change to 65% let off is just a change in modules.
 

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I just received my new Invicta 37 DCX cam I have the 75% letoff it sure ain’t 75% if I was you I would go and draw one before you order one not happy with mine at all might be sold before it even gets setup
 
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