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My one gripe with FOBS!!

847 Views 14 Replies 8 Participants Last post by  Paul Morris
I'm a definite fan of FOBS. It's all I will shoot any more.

However, I DO have one major gripe with them and I'm curious to see if anyone else feels as I do.

that issue would be: CRACKING/BREAKAGE.

I believe that the manufacturers of the FOBS have not chosen the best material for their product. Surely there exist at least several varieties of plastic that would offer better durability than what is currently being used. All it takes is one hit from an incoming arrow and bam, the FOB is toast and there goes another couple $$ down the drain.

Come on Starrflight... I KNOW you can do it - make the FOB with a more durable material. Sure, you might end up selling a few less but it will make your diehard fans happy. :thumbs_up:tongue:
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I'm a definite fan of FOBS. It's all I will shoot any more.

However, I DO have one major gripe with them and I'm curious to see if anyone else feels as I do.

that issue would be: CRACKING/BREAKAGE.

I believe that the manufacturers of the FOBS have not chosen the best material for their product. Surely there exist at least several varieties of plastic that would offer better durability than what is currently being used. All it takes is one hit from an incoming arrow and bam, the FOB is toast and there goes another couple $$ down the drain.

Come on Starrflight... I KNOW you can do it - make the FOB with a more durable material. Sure, you might end up selling a few less but it will make your diehard fans happy. :thumbs_up:tongue:
I don't have any problem with them breaking,UNLESS I shoot the same spot. I think it would be real tough to use a more flexable material and maintain the rigidity needed. Not to mention it would probably price them out what most would want to spend IF possible. One big reason FOB's work so well is they dont loose shape and flutter like vanes/feathers. This is just my opinion,nothing I have heard from Paul.
 

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I have no issues with fobs. I do my best as to not group them. Are you breaking the collars off your fobs and the fob slides down the shaft?. I second what rutnstrut stated. This as come up before and so far this was the best Material to use for Archery. Fobs can't be too soft or they will loose form and or wobble. They can't be too hard or they will just crack from the Arrow impacting any Target. Just my opinion.:darkbeer:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
they break when another arrow (or a FOB on an arrow) impacts them coming in to the target. I don't really shoot more than 2 arrows into one spot but it still happens.

don't tell me that there isn't a material out there that offers similar rigidity but a higher level of impact resistance!!! I used to deal a lot with polyurethane rubber in work that I did and there are many degrees of flexibility and strength available in that material and I know the same is true for plastics.
 

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i went the whole season last year with just one tube of fobs for hunting and practice. I only broke two or three fobs, if i remember correctly. I shoot one arrow per spot. When it comes to the material issue, we'll just wait for Pauls response. I would assume that there might be a cost factor. Happy Hunting!.:thumbs_up
 

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\ I used to deal a lot with polyurethane rubber in work that I did and there are many degrees of flexibility and strength available in that material and I know the same is true for plastics.

You will start running into them being too heavy if you aren't careful :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Maybe Paul will surprise us when he comes out with the next generation Fob?.:wink:
that'd be very cool. next generation FOB -- I'll definitely need to get my hands on those if they're a better design! :thumbs_up
 

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My story is the exact opposite. Even though he didn't recommend it, I went and shot groups with my FOBs. I did it over and over again, and broke just one. I found them to be extremely durable. I don't shoot a compound for hunting anymore because I caught the trad bug, but when I pick up the compound again for indoor spots, you'll see me with FOBs for sure.
 

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they break when another arrow (or a FOB on an arrow) impacts them coming in to the target.
It is a fine line that dictates when a Fob is going to stay in and do what it is intended to do and when it will pop off if it gets into a situation that might cause it harm. I was shooting groups and semi-not groups with Fobs when I first started, and I was breaking them a plenty. Till I was told That my nocks were too tight.

So I began testing different tightness of FOBs and found out about this fine line called WORKS/BREAKS. It you take a standard axis arrow and use a z nock without any alteration it fits in the arrow shaft TIGHT, tight enough that the sell a tool just so you are able to adjust the nocks. If you shoot FOBs with this kind of nock, if you hit anything at all with any stopping power, it will break the FOB at the small ring and probably find the big ring down at the target end of the shaft.

On the other end of the spectrum is the loose nock. If you take 320 grit sand paper and give the whole nock base area a good sanding , it will create a FOB that is so loose, that one of two things will happen. One is that the nock with stay with the string if you go to draw the bow and your full capture rest(like my Kaz fall away) has a hold of the arrow, but the arrow will stay in its starting place without moving. Or when you do draw and the arrow and nock comes back with the arrow, upon release, your arrow will fly down target with the FOB and nock coming off somewhere between the bow and the target. This will usually result in a lost nock.

The medium of this is a simple adjustment. I take a new nock and a small 1" piece of 320 grit sandpaper. I fold the sandpaper in half then open back up t set nock in the fold/ Now on the x nock there are two separate sets of knobs that give it the tight fit. I only VERY LIGHTLY sand the whole base, then move to the shaft end of the nock and sand a little harder about 1/8th " This will give the nock the shoulders to hold the FOBs tight, but allow the shaft to not grip so tight that it wont let go if it hits something.

I still have FOBss from my first tube that show little notched where I have hit previous shot arrow with FOBs and had the incoming FOB pop off. that is when you know that the nocks are just right. I have since shot groups and have had either one of two things happen. I either have arrows that have hit previous arrows with FOBs, where the shaft goes inside the first ring and the back FOB pop off. Or the incoming arrow will glance off the ring and not hit so close and the incoming FOB will still pop off. Either way, I still have not broke any FOBs in a long time.

I understand guys feeling that they are going to never get to the point where they are going to like them. like you would think that there is no way it would ever get cost effective to keep trying them if they keep breaking. But once you find the things you need to and you have answers to all the negative things, then It is something that can be trusted and believed in.

I am the type of guy that likes the challenge of someone saying "You cant' or it won't. I surely would not keep using them or keep giving them away to guys that want to try them, unless I felt they were nearly perfect in my opinion. Now I know my opinion is just that, MINE> and it my vary from everybody else’s but, I have confidence that if a person puts away their "love of what is normal and comfortable" and be willing to try "new" to the point where they try and overcome what they feel are the negatives, then they will have given FOBs an honest try, and that is all I ask when I give some away to try.

I am relative new to the sport compared to most of the others, but I have spent enough time fletching with vanes to know that the process of gluing and pressing vanes on arrows is a hit and miss process at best. now I know it got better as I done it more but there is enough vanes get stripped by other arrows hitting them, or they just lose adhesiveness, to know that the excuse that Fobs don’t last as long as vanes is just an excuse. A poor one to boot.
 

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After about a hundred types of material, we made the choice of a high impact nylon. Everything is a compromise with material. We all want what I call unobtainium.

Urethanes, while almost indestructible, do not hold the shape. Say you lay your bow down on the FOB and it will go flat. Also the softer material is more cut prone.

I made the decision that it is best to have a FOB that #1 holds its shape, has very good memory properties and is resistant to cuts. I guess that is because I am a stump shooter/hunter and having a FOB that does not cut and stays round was important.

The are millions of combinations regarding material. What we have is a compromise given all the factors primarily in a hunting situation. Like a carbon arrow, I like perfect or broke. Nothing in between for me.

We are kicking around the idea of a target FOB that will take a hit, however nothing will hold up to a direct impact with an arrow.

Having said all this...If a better material comes along that meets my hunting criteria, we will go for it.

If you do like to shoot groups (So do I), you can set up a cheep 2 or 3" wide foam target in front of your block target at least an arrows length away. Then when you have a pass through, the FOB will pop off (undamaged for re-use) and you can try and shoot the same hole. Those ballistic peel and stick gun targets make for a good spot indicator. They turn from black to green when you make a hit.

Regards,
 
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