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OK before all the hysteria starts and people start saying things like "You are going to kill your self..." Let me say I've been using this design for 30 years and have had zero issues. I always use a safety rope and harness and I always tie into a prussic knot while climbing. I have 3 good friends seriously injured one of which was paralized by a tree stand fall and an uncle who broke his back in a treestand fall. So I am acutely aware of the dangers inherent in treestand usage. Let me now say I am not endorsing that you copy my design, if you choose to do so you do it at your own risk.

Again because I don't own a welder and have no where to put one everything I build has to be done without welding or I have to coerce a friend or two into helping me. So here is my no weld design.

The frame is built with 1 inch aluminum tubing both the undercarriage and the uprights are approximately 20" the cross bar is 8 inches and the seat bars are about 6". Everything is bolted together with stainless steel washers, nuts, bolts 1/4-20 and 5/16-18 so I don't have to worry about them rusting out over time. the chain is connected to the frame with a threaded anchor hasp and threaded mending link. The chain is rated to 850 pounds and is the weakest link (so to speak) in the hardware. Everything else is more like 1500 pound rating. The support cables I purchased from McMaster Carr. They also are stainless steel and I have the crimping tool to make the looped cable ends. When I made my first cables over 30 years ago I was a bit skeptical but after some testing felt they were more than up to the task. This time I put them on a scale to get an idea of just how much they could withstand. As you can see the sample held up fine to 500#. While it was at that pressure I hit it repeatedly with a hammer to simulate shock and it didn't budge. Another thing to keep in mind is that a single cable will never be supporting your entire weight. the stand is supported by 4 points so the load is always distributed.

The platform is 3/4" plywood and I paint it with stain and camo ...eventually.

So your next question is how much did it cost, and if I didn't have some of the materials in scraps and the scrap plywood too these would have been a little over $100.00. So don't build these thinking you will save money, because you can do better with the commercial stands. I just like the idea that when I build them I know who and how they were built and I trust my own skill over some other random guy getting paid close to minimum wage.

Well there you go Enjoy
 

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Discussion Starter #2
here is one of the 30 year old ones that has been camo painted. About every 7 or 8 years I replace the plywood depending on how ratty it looks. At the first sign of laminate separation or sooner I replace the plywood.
 

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Thanks for sharing. Great post! What does one of those stands weigh?
 

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Well done b0w bender. Nicely explained, as always. Keep up the great work on DIY items, I for 1 enjoy them.
 

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I think I have the exact design hanging in my garage...was left here when we moved in. Never did have the balls to try it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What would you say the weight rating on the platform?
Oh I would be quite comfortable with 500 pounds but the chain is only rated for 850 so perhaps the safe estimate would be 425#
 

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Looks like a nice unit is there any support going across the platform or just the plywood and also what are you using for brackets to attach the bottom bars and still be able to fold. Thanks
 

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VERY similar to the ones I will be building for our lease in Ohio only I will weld my joints too, just because I can ;) NICE WORK, these look solid!! Anymore I notice my conduit stands are getting heavy to hang since I make them so big, aluminum would fix the weight issue.....
 

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and I'm sure that is mostly plywood weight ;)
 

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and I'm sure that is mostly plywood weight ;)
Ya, that is correct the weight is in the plywood.

Some one asked above if there was a brace across the bottom, the answer is no a piece of 3/4 plywood is plenty sturdy to hold a human.
 
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