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Need a wee bit of help with my form

1031 Views 17 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  3D-Nut
Attached is a picture (from the top) of me at full draw. No matter what I do I cannot seem to get my elbow directly behind (in line with) the arrow. I am under the impression that having the elbow behind the arrow is help full in keeping left/right misses to a minimum. Yes I stuggle with more left/right misses than I think I should. Can anybody help me figure out how to fix this? I have already dropped a bunch of draw length. It seems that whether I am shooting 29.5" or 28.0" my elbow is never behind the arrow.

Thanks!

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Every time youve been shortening your draw length, youve been allowing your hands to get closer by rotating the line of your shoulders away from the bow (and away from good alignment). I think your draw might be a touch short from this angle (id have to see a side on shot taken in the same session as a top shot to be sure). My advice is to concentrate on getting your shoulder alignment first - imagine a line going through your shoulders and that you want that line to point right at the target. Once you achieve that, then you reasses your draw based on your draw side elbow. Im 100% certain that when your shoulders are right, youre going to feel pretty bunched up all of a sudden. Thats a good sign!

Its a myth that the leaning back/forward or the height of your elbow alone is resposible for draw, there are a series of bones from one wrist to the other and up and down your body responsible for alignment, and they've all gotta be right!
 

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Yeah it seems short. However, if you can't shoot better scores with DL 1/2'' or 1'' longer than this, then stay with this DL.
There was a pic of Tim Gillingham taken from an angle that shows his shoulders even more open... I guess some people are simply more comfortable to shoot it that way.
 

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Its actually something i did for some time because of a neck injury - i simply couldnt rotate my neck around enough to look through the bow when my alignment was good. Its only in the last few months ive been working on my flexibility to get a better form going.
 

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Attached is a picture (from the top) of me at full draw. No matter what I do I cannot seem to get my elbow directly behind (in line with) the arrow. I am under the impression that having the elbow behind the arrow is help full in keeping left/right misses to a minimum. Yes I stuggle with more left/right misses than I think I should. Can anybody help me figure out how to fix this? I have already dropped a bunch of draw length. It seems that whether I am shooting 29.5" or 28.0" my elbow is never behind the arrow.

Thanks!

your elbow looks like it is behind the arrow to me matter of fact its just a little to far past. I'm thinking you want to be on the other side when aiming and pull through to where it is now when the shot breaks.

just as a side note is your bubble level when your shot breaks?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That is what I meant Bees, my elbow isnt in line with the arrow, it is past. My bubble is always level when I initiate the shot, I have no idea where it is when it releases.

Thanks
 

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That is what I meant Bees, my elbow isnt in line with the arrow, it is past. My bubble is always level when I initiate the shot, I have no idea where it is when it releases.

Thanks
The only time it is important to know where the bubble is, is when the shot is breaking. if you can get it consistant the left right will diminish.

Try to just stretch out your bow arm just a small amount and take another picture, see if that doesn't move the elbow to the other side of the arrow. or slide your hips to the target anything to get your shoulders lined up just a bit different so your elbow moves to the other side of the arrow, looks like all you need to move is 2 inches at most.
 

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When I open my stance quite a bit my elbow moves a very tiny bit.

I am not sure what you meen by sliding my hips twards the target?

Thanks you

with my body I tend to put too much weight on my right leg which moves my hips to a closed position on the target and when I drift right I hit right. to fix I found if I shift my weight to my left my hips swing back around to the left and I'm back in the center again. too much though and I off to the left.
so I got this constant weight shift thing and I have learned to transfer the weight by sliding my hips either toward or away from the target. Uneven footing on field coarse affects my left and rights a lot.
Maybe Nuts and bolts can chime in to see what alignment effects you. :)
 

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Foot position can help.

Bow shoulder way too far away from the arrow,
when you are at full draw.

Adjust the foot position
to REDUCE the gap between bow shoulder
and the arrow,
when you are at full draw.


STAND TALL...think like you have to squeeze between
two narrow bookcases that are 7-feet tall
and only 12-inches apart.


STOP leaning forward with your head.
Lift the chest up.
Suck in the stomach, and make the stomach the core of your foundation.
Push down on the heels and make yourself as "skinny" as possible.

This will help lift the head, straighten the lower back
and keep the head centered (front to back).

When you adjust your feet to help rotate your entire body,
so that the TWO SHOULDERS form a line that points to the RIGHT of the target....

this will help INCREASE the total distance
between the release side elbow and the bow riser.

When the TOTAL distance between release elbow
and the riser INCREASES, the elbow tip automatically lines up.
 

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When you straighten out the bow arm,
and move the bow shoulder MUCH MUCH closer to the arrow,
when at full draw,
the gap between the release side elbow
and the bow riser is going to increase very very noticeably...

so ALLOW THE NOCK TO SLIDE FORWARD ON YOUR FACE,
while you STAND LIKE A STATUE
and DO NOT MOVE YOUR HEAD FORWARD....

LET the nock slide foward on your face,
and keep standing tall and straight,
cuz the anchor facial touch point is GOING TO CHANGE
and the string probably will not touch your nose anymore.

Get used to the nock touching a NEW SPOT on your face.


If the nock touching your face (single contact point)
is not enough for you...
and you absolutely must have two touch points on your face...

consider adding a kisser button,
cuz the string most likely will not touch your nose,
anymore.


Classic reason for head tilted forward,
like in your picture
is the nock is too far back on the face
and you have to tilt your head way over the toes
to be able to see through the peep sight.
 

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N&B is right on ---
When you get the front shoulder rolled down toward the string, with arm straight, you'll have a good solid foundation----right now you have a mush of muscles trying to do what bones do automaticly every time no matter how many shots you've made.

The bones don't get tired as muscles do.

When the muscles get tired your body centerline moves deeper into your back, because the back gets soft

At that point you then need to lean forward even more to get your centerline back again.

You will need to get those nuckles/bow hand at 45 deg to pull the front shoulder into allignment---but I suspect your grip needs work---see

http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=456493

You can shoot as you are for maybe 20 arrows a day, but if you want to be able to shoot 100 arrows a day -----this is the most important change you'll make for your form.

Thanks N&B
 
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