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Discussion Starter #1
okay. well ive been doing some scouting on my property lately and sound a field about 1 acre big with a huge oak tree at the corner. its grown up with waist high weeds but i found 2 sheds from the same deer in the middle of it! it was a 14 point typical!!!! in South Carolina! i couldnt fit my hands around the bases. but i will be planting this field for next season. i now have a few questions and need some input please,

1-should i plant something this spring so theyknow that the plot is there and then plant again this fall?
2-what should i plant and when?
3-how big should the plot be?
4-should i completley clear the little field and plant? or should i just bushog and disc and plant?
5-should i stick a ground blind on the corner of the plot and brush it in? or use a hang on stand in the oak?
thank youvery much!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It's not a bedding area. I checked all over the place for a bed. Nothing. The whole field is grown up. They bed about 100 yards away.
 

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If you've found 2 sets of sheds from the same deer there and it hasn't been a food source in the past it is a bedding area for that deer and probly many others. I wouldn't disturb it at all. I would position my stand, whether it be a ground blind or lock on, between it and the closest food source and catch him in the transition from bed to feed or feed to bed. If you disturb his bedding area he WILL establish a new one somewheres else and that may be on the neighbors place for all we know.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The field was cleared 3 years ago. No trees. Just straw grass
 

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Discussion Starter #6
And I fibbed a little. I found one shed on the edge of the field and the matching shed about 100 yards away in the bedding area
 

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I wouldn't touch it either. Everyone's got there own opinion but big bucks don't get big by being dumb. Most cases, let him know your there, and he wont be!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Okay. But I still have another spot I wanna plant. What should I do in regards to my questions?
 

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First I'd prepare the ground by mowing and harrowing. Then I would suggest a soil sample to know how much lime and fertilizer you'll need per acre. That is the best way to get the most yield and moneys worth out of your seed. I would definitely plant in spring and fall. After the last frost in spring I like to plant a mixture of soybeans and other peas. In the fall, a mixture of winter wheat, oats, clover, and turnips. They wont eat the turnips until after a couple of hard freezes. Also during the spring I like to use mineral supplements in these same areas to help does with fawns and bucks growing new bone in early summer. Hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It helps a lot. Thank you so much! Anybody else like to do anything different?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ttt
 

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Discussion Starter #13
ttt
 

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The field was cleared 3 years ago. No trees. Just straw grass
This tells me it's an ideal bedding area. Any area that has been cleared in the middle of a timber or where several trees have fallen over and allowed light to hit the ground will be ideal bedding areas. If the sun hits the ground in this area I guessing it's a bedding area. I would try to stay out of that area.

Now to answer your questions.

What should you plant? Depends are what your goals of the plot are. By the way you're talking I'm guessing all you are concerned about is a killing plot for the fall. In that case I would plat winter rye/clover/peas about the 1st of sept.

How should you go about this? Disk the ground up about sometime in July and then allow the weeds to germinate and spray them about 2 weeks prior to planting. I'd broadcast the peas onto the undistrubed disked ground and then run a harrow/culitpacker over the ground. Then I'd spread the clover/winter rye seed and cultipack it again. Spread about 300 lbs of 10-10-10 per ac.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
This tells me it's an ideal bedding area. Any area that has been cleared in the middle of a timber or where several trees have fallen over and allowed light to hit the ground will be ideal bedding areas. If the sun hits the ground in this area I guessing it's a bedding area. I would try to stay out of that area.

Now to answer your questions.

What should you plant? Depends are what your goals of the plot are. By the way you're talking I'm guessing all you are concerned about is a killing plot for the fall. In that case I would plat winter rye/clover/peas about the 1st of sept.

How should you go about this? Disk the ground up about sometime in July and then allow the weeds to germinate and spray them about 2 weeks prior to planting. I'd broadcast the peas onto the undistrubed disked ground and then run a harrow/culitpacker over the ground. Then I'd spread the clover/winter rye seed and cultipack it again. Spread about 300 lbs of 10-10-10 per ac.
i am looking for a killing plot thisfall. but i also want a nutritional plot for the deer to be as healthy as possible.
 

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Bow season killing plot try forage soy beans. Stay green well after all other soy beans have lost their appeal and good nutrition. Easy to plant and maintain. Plus relatively inexpensive. I have also started planting strips. Say divide the field into four equal strips and plant alternating forage beans and brassica or oats. Plant clover around the headlands. The tall grass I would leave. Our CRP sections hold more deer than the rest of the farm minus standing corn. Which brings up another idea. Best cover/food mix plant corn but throw switch grass seed in with the corn at let it stand. Replant after 3 years. This is a awesome tactic for holding mature bucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
very helpful. thank you!
 

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Agree with the forage soybeans and standing corn. If you can get the corn to actually ear in the south with sandy soil and no irrigation.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
yeahh that might be a real problem. what about egyptian wheat?
 

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As for planting in the spring, it really depends on how much agriculture is in the area. If there are soybeans being planted close by then I would not worry about trying to plant in the spring. If there are no crops in the immediate area, then I would consider planting in the spring. Another factor is deer density. An acre of soybeans planted in a 1 acre plot in an area with many hungry deer could wipe out a little plot in a couple of weeks. I had this happen a couple of years ago and it was a total waste of money, time and effort. Since my farm is surrounded with crops, I only plant plots in the fall. The easiest and one of the most attractive plots is a grain/crimson clover plot. You could plant oats and wheat and overseed with crimson clover. It will require some fertilizer but the seed is cheap and the deer will love it. It will attract deer in about 14 days as the young oats and wheat emerge and it will be grazed until the following spring. The turkeys will also like it for the following spring gobbler season. It is easy to grow and not too expensive. I would get it cleared and keep it mowed through the summer and hit it with some roundup if possible to kill weeds. Probably plant in SC around the end of Sept or first week of Oct. Hope this helps. We do this every year in several plots.
 
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