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Discussion Starter #1
I have been shooting a carter evolution tension release and I like the concept but I find this release not very consistant. I have had it for over a year and I keep tring it and its allways the same thing. One day it fires light and the next day it fires heavy. I spend more time adjusting it than I do shooting it. Im ready to try something else.
Here is were I need the help........ What is the diference in a tension release and a hinge release ? Im thinking about tring a hinge release buy not sure of the difference. Can someone explain the difference in the two and how they work. Maybe this will help me decide my next release.
 

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I will try and give my version and what I have heard about the evolution even though I have not personally shot one. I did shoot the Carter Attraction and currently shoot two Stan Elements.
1) The differance between resistance and hinge is that resistance is set to go off at a certain poundage over your holding weight. A hinge is activated by rotating the release to activate the hinge which is adjusted by a moon. Both of these release should be done by proper back tension.
2) From what I have heard others say about the Evolution is that consistent hand position is very critical in getting a consistent release. One person I shoot with shoots them and I have noticed if it is a severe angle shot up or down he may have to let down as he sometimes has trouble with it going off.
3) I did not see a big differance in the Attraction and the Element just that the Element felt so much better in my hand is why I went back to the Stan.
Hope this is helpful.
 

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It's much easier to cheat and punch with a hinge than with a pull-through. The hinge fires based on how far the handle has been rotated. Rotate it far enough and there's not enough angle or tension or friction left to keep the loop on the hook and it fires. As you know, on a pull-through the hook releases when you pull harder than your holding poundage. I've punched my Longhorn hinge many times either accidentally or on purpose. It's something you have to be aware of and train yourself not to do.

The Evolution is notorious for being "touchy". Part of that is due to it's requirement that everything be EXACTLY the same every time you shoot. Frustrating, but in it's self, not a bad thing. From what I've read, the other part is due to it's internal spring mechanism which is sometimes not as consistent as the Stan Element sear mechanism. The Performance Archery TV website used to have a segment discussing the Evolution quirks but I couldn't get it to load otherwise I would have posted the link.

I went to a Stan Shootoff (thumb) from my hinge. I shoot it back tension and like it better than the hinge. Not completely sure why, part of it is that it feels better, part of it is that it sort of has a safety and is easier to let down. By saying "sort of" I mean that if you keep your thumb behind the thumb peg until you're anchored and ready to fire, that acts exactly like a safety. It's also MUCH easier to adjust in terms of how it fits your hand and how light the firing mechanism is.

The new Truball Inside Out hinge looks pretty awesome though.
 

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Socket Man
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I went through the same frustration last year with my carter evolution, I strongly suggest you switch to a hinge and shoot true back tension. I learned back tension this spring using a true ball bt gold and a stans micro 3 and after trying a variety over the summer when I found someone with a release that caught my attention I shot it and have been trying to narrow down which one to get. The two best I have tried are the trueball ultra sweetspot 2 and the bernies knuckle under both in the swept back style.

I am going to be getting the trueball ultra sweetspot 2 in the 4 finger swept back because you can pull it disengaged and when you get it back to anchor you touch a button and then it engages and you start your firing sequence and it goes off. All other hinges you have to draw with more tension on the index finger and thumb peg to keep them from going off and then when you get to anchor getting your hand in the exact same spot every time is hard for a beginner. The ultra sweetspot allows you to draw with all fingers and get to anchor with a comfortable amount of tension on the entire release and then touch the button that turns the release to live mode so you can start your backtension and fire.
 

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I went through the same frustration last year with my carter evolution, I strongly suggest you switch to a hinge and shoot true back tension. I learned back tension this spring using a true ball bt gold and a stans micro 3 and after trying a variety over the summer when I found someone with a release that caught my attention I shot it and have been trying to narrow down which one to get. The two best I have tried are the trueball ultra sweetspot 2 and the bernies knuckle under both in the swept back style.

I am going to be getting the trueball ultra sweetspot 2 in the 4 finger swept back because you can pull it disengaged and when you get it back to anchor you touch a button and then it engages and you start your firing sequence and it goes off. All other hinges you have to draw with more tension on the index finger and thumb peg to keep them from going off and then when you get to anchor getting your hand in the exact same spot every time is hard for a beginner. The ultra sweetspot allows you to draw with all fingers and get to anchor with a comfortable amount of tension on the entire release and then touch the button that turns the release to live mode so you can start your backtension and fire.
I draw with all three fingers on my Knuckle Under. Just set it slower and use the click as a warning. This lets you really relax your fingers and hand and, as a result, makes the release extremely consistent. The downside to safeties is that they don't teach any consistency in drawing and anchoring, they let you just draw however.
 

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I'd be a little leery of the Sweetspot concept simply because by using that safety, your pull angle could be off and you could be further into (or out of) the half moon and release sequence than you'd planned once you take your thumb off. The subconscious awareness that "I have to draw this safely and at a certain angle or I'll bust my face" isn't there when you put a safety on a hinge. That's without actually trying it though. Maybe that isn't actually a problem once you start shooting with it.Just a side note: the OP IS shooting true back tension. That's the way you shoot an Evolution.
 

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Shootin and Cussin
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2) From what I have heard others say about the Evolution is that consistent hand position is very critical in getting a consistent release. One person I shoot with shoots them and I have noticed if it is a severe angle shot up or down he may have to let down as he sometimes has trouble with it going off.
There you go.......

I've been shooting an Evo+ indoors for a couple of years now. They are VERY critical of hand position.
 

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Socket Man
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Hunt123 that is the beauty of the sweetspot is that when you draw it isn't a safety, it is totally disengaged from the half moon and when you get to full draw and anchor then you push the button you are now engaged on the half moon with your pre set amount of travel to make it go off every time. I didn't know this existed until I tried one and it is pretty slick idea.
 

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Hunt123 that is the beauty of the sweetspot is that when you draw it isn't a safety, it is totally disengaged from the half moon and when you get to full draw and anchor then you push the button you are now engaged on the half moon with your pre set amount of travel to make it go off every time. I didn't know this existed until I tried one and it is pretty slick idea.
It still changes the angle of your hand relative to the bow. No good for learning consistency.
 

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Socket Man
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I am definately in the learning phase and on a scale of 1 to 10 the evolution was a 10 when it came to being difficult to become consistant, the bt gold trueball has a click and I would rate it at a 8, the stans micro 3 is rated at 7. They are the releases that I currently own where as the sweetspot and bernies knuckle under on my wishlist and I rate both of them at a 3 for the bernies and a 2 for the sweetspot.

My problem is that shops don't have a variety for you to try so when you invest 180 into a new evolution and you find that it isn't what you want you aren't going to get all of that 180 back, plus I have three releases that I have put over a year into and I don't like any of them.

My other problem is that the guys in my area that are shooting handle releases from hinge to thumb trigger are for the most part they cheat and don't really shoot with true back tension so listening to them recommend a release is worthless when you watch them punch the thumb or squeeze their pinky.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
OK It seems like its all about position. I will continue playing with the evolution but in the meen time I would like to pick up a new release to try. Can anyone suggest a good easy to learn back tension release. I see alot of talk about the hooker, would thid be a good one to learn???
Thanks
 

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Any of the releases will not be consistant if you are not consistant. Your Evolution has been telling you youare not consistant. Listen to it and figure out what you are changing instead of changing the release. The evo is very sensitive to changes in pre loading anything from foot placement to where your little finger is will make it fire differently.
 

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OK It seems like its all about position. I will continue playing with the evolution but in the meen time I would like to pick up a new release to try. Can anyone suggest a good easy to learn back tension release. I see alot of talk about the hooker, would thid be a good one to learn???
Thanks
Just sold mine. It's an amazingly simple release which is nice. But mine was a 2 finger and I couldn't get used to it. If you go with a Hooker, I'd suggest the 3 finger one. And pay attention to which hole size. One thing about the Hooker to be aware of is that it's either a trigger release or a back tension release, depending on how you shoot it. Their video shows it being shot both ways. So you'll have to pay close attention so you don't trigger it.

The Stan Element will minimize your chance of cheating/punching. The rest of them, the Hookers, the hinges, the thumb releases, ALL are easy to punch (and I've done it plenty of times with all of them) but all CAN be shot correctly with back tension. You just have to stay aware of what you're doing and practice a lot until it's automatic.

In terms of which is easiest/best, that's an impossible question for someone else to answer for you. Everyone has their own preferences and sometimes tend to be real opinionated about them as though what they like is what everyone else should use.

Out of all of the styles, I'd say the Hooker is the simplest but Carter makes one that has a similar hook style (http://www.carterenterprises.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=109&Itemid=363). The handle is different though.
 

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ArcheryLessonsOnline.com
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I have been shooting a carter evolution tension release and I like the concept but I find this release not very consistant. I have had it for over a year and I keep tring it and its allways the same thing. One day it fires light and the next day it fires heavy. I spend more time adjusting it than I do shooting it. Im ready to try something else.
Here is were I need the help........ What is the diference in a tension release and a hinge release ? Im thinking about tring a hinge release buy not sure of the difference. Can someone explain the difference in the two and how they work. Maybe this will help me decide my next release.
I can provide you a little insight regarding the day to day fluctuation in the Evolution...

Something you need to pay strict attention to is the manner in which you draw the bow & how consistant you are with coming into the back wall. You might be surprised how easy it is to have a 1-2 lb variation in holding weight from day to day, depending on your level of strength on any given day.

As you draw the bow, be sure to draw smoothly. IE, don't draw fast & furious & smack into the back wall. As you approach the wall, settle into the draw stops & then add 1+ pound to the back wall. This will ensure that you both settle into the stops and also have a consistant holding weight.

Since you have configured your EVO to fire based on the holding weight of the bow, you can see how easily a small fluctuation in holding weight can effect the way the release fires.

Again, as always. plug... www.ArcheryLessonsOnline.com :)

-Adam
 

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To digress (just a little)...
One way to avoid many issues is to get a hinge or a hook and forget about the gimmicks and gadgets out there. In other words no evo's, no safeties, etc. Learn the release without a bow and you will take many months out of the learning curve. I really wanted to learn and spent six months and literally 18,000 or so shots before ever letting her fly at a real target at regulation distances. I think it's working at least a little as I had two different well known professional archers examine my technique up really close and in person for more than a few shots and they were well pleased. So, the moral of the story is... Get a coach - or at least a few books and dvd's - and start from scratch as if you have never shot a bow before. If I could put a small dent in mastering such a thing (and I am still learning by the way) then I know you could for sure.
 

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Shootin and Cussin
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Hand position on the release, hand position on your anchor, or both ?
Both.... The angle of the release relative to the bow is critical. It makes you MUCH more consistent.
 

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Just a side note: the OP IS shooting true back tension. That's the way you shoot an Evolution.
One doesn't necessarily follow the other. I can set off my Evolution by simply dropping my release elbow without any back tension.

It is, certainly, a release designed to be shot with back tension.
 

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Shootin and Cussin
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By dropping your elbow you are creating back tension. :wink:
 

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OK It seems like its all about position. I will continue playing with the evolution but in the meen time I would like to pick up a new release to try. Can anyone suggest a good easy to learn back tension release. I see alot of talk about the hooker, would thid be a good one to learn???
Thanks
You need to look at the Stan back tension releases. They all come with the Trainer Lock Pin that allows you to draw your bow and pull thru the release without the release going off. Set the release up with the Clicker hook and you can practice drawing, relax your hand to the clicker, then pull thru the shot. These releases are great for learning to shoot BT or training at home without having to shoot an arrow or worrying about making a mistake and punching yourself or launching an arrow.
 
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