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Discussion Starter #1
I have not used one in the past, but, am interested in opinions for or against. I probably won't shoot further than 35 - 40 yards, but, have to shoot 3 pins to get there. My pins are at 25, 35 & 45, but, haven't considered taking the longer shot even though I do practice it.

I would assume you figure out distances when you are settled, if your first time hunting an area. I assume I figure my distances pretty accurately, but, would hate to be wrong.

How many use them or feel like they are necessary? What brands and features would you suggest?

Thanks for the help.
 

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I use one...I wont carry it in the stand every time, after I have hunted that stand long enough to know my yardages. But it is nice to have the ability to know the EXACT distance to your target....not to mention, since I bought these Nikon 440's, I probably won't even have to carry my binos. They are 8X and you know how thick the woods are down here in FL.
 

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If used proper the modern rangefinder is an invaluable tool. I have owned several but the Bushnell Yardage Pro that I currently own is my favorite. I had a Nikon but it was no where near as consistent in measurements as my bushnells have been. Maybe I got a lemon:)
 

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Bushnell Yardage Pro for me also. Best out there in the average guys price range.
 

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I also use a Bushnell Yardage Pro. This will be my 2nd season using it and I love it. Remember to range trees from the stand that are at eye level, not the base of the trees below. Gravity effects arrows on a horizontal plane, so eye level readings will be your true yardage. Thats why bowhunters always say aim low when shooting out of a stand. Hope this helps!:)
 

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Always have one with me. Set up, shoot distances and remember them. Keep it handy in case I have a doubt about the distance on a deer.
 

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Leica Rangefinder

They aren't cheap, but, they are always clear and their measurements exact!

I have taken them to football fields to check and they were always e4xact!
 

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If you bend at the waist rather than dropping your bow arm your arrow will hit where you aim. I have a Bushnell Yardage Pro that I just bought from a friend last week. I intend to use it this season. It's not necessary to have one. All you have to do is pace off the distances to a few trees or other objects near your stand for references when you get up there. However, I have forgotten to do that before and had to guess. The range finder just elimintates any guesswork and the need to pace off distances.
 

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YellowHawkk said:
If you bend at the waist rather than dropping your bow arm your arrow will hit where you aim. I have a Bushnell Yardage Pro that I just bought from a friend last week. I intend to use it this season. It's not necessary to have one. All you have to do is pace off the distances to a few trees or other objects near your stand for references when you get up there. However, I have forgotten to do that before and had to guess. The range finder just elimintates any guesswork and the need to pace off distances.

Trouble with pacing off distances is: you're leaving scent to all points of the compass around your stand. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I appreciate the feedback. I assume difference in more expensive models is the ability to range longer distances and accuracy at those distances.
 

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I'm guessing so...also the ability to range up close....not all units range up close...mine will work as short as ten yards....great for bowhunting. Also some higher end units have scan option as well as the ability to change between yards/meters etc. Some have more magnification than others too. You can also get binos with built in rangefinders.
 

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SoWeGA Hunter said:
I appreciate the feedback. I assume difference in more expensive models is the ability to range longer distances and accuracy at those distances.

For bowhunting and almost any hunting the Bushnell Yardage pro is all you need..
I personnaly have the Bushnell scout and I like it,but I picked the yardage pro up in the classifieds here for my Dad and its just fine and half the price of my Scout..:rolleyes: :)

As far as accuracy, they are plenty accurate as the high dollar models,maybe not all the bells and whistles that are really not needed anyway IMO..
 

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i use a lecia , the reason i prefer the Leica is their optic qualities and that they have lighted digits so you will se them clear nomather the backgroundcolur witch is not the case with all models.
The Leica is also very reliable in thei reading nomather the surface you are spotting, some RF.s are not reliable on all types of surfaces, they can missjudge alot sometimes.
 

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I have a yardage pro sport. It works well, but it isn't as compact as the Nikon 440. I also had trouble ranging black targets on the 3D course. I just bought a Nikon and so far am very happy with it.
 

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I can't compare the Nikon 440 to anything else, as it's the only one I've ever owned, but I really like the thing. Just under 2 bills I think. It's my favorite "unnecessary" toy, and believe me, I have a lot of unnecessary trinkets.
 
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