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Discussion Starter #1
Will be mostly used for hunting, 31" draw, 74lbs running 29" arrow length out of an E35. Has anyone shot either of these arrows out of a set up like mine, if so which did you like better and why? Also would 300 spine be good or need to look at other options for spine? Thanks in advance
 

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I prefer the Axis because I believe it is more durable. A 300 spine (10.7 gpi.) at 29" carbon to carbon will weigh 453.3 grains and a 260 spine (11.5 gpi.) at 29" carbon to carbon will weigh 476.5. I think either would work with your setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies, will mostly be whitetail with hopefully elk soon. Was thinking of running an extra 50 grains up front, that's why I was asking about spine. Thanks again for the responses.
 

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I think .300 spine will be fine. Even with the extra 50 up front. I figured you were using 100gr heads. Where are you going elk hunting?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
looking at Montana and Wyoming, not sure yet. Need to go mule deer hunting at your place up north.
 

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I have a similar setup (70#, 30" draw). I opted for a slightly lighter setup with Black Eagle Carnivore 250's cut to 29" with a 100gr brass insert at the front. They fly amazing so far but still tuning. They're only 9.7 gpi so with the insert and 100gr point they are 510 grains with a 16% FOC. I'd rather shoot that than a standard Axis or FMJ of similar weight but lower FOC.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have a similar setup (70#, 30" draw). I opted for a slightly lighter setup with Black Eagle Carnivore 250's cut to 29" with a 100gr brass insert at the front. They fly amazing so far but still tuning. They're only 9.7 gpi so with the insert and 100gr point they are 510 grains with a 16% FOC. I'd rather shoot that than a standard Axis or FMJ of similar weight but lower FOC.
Thanks, that's sounds really good. Definitely something to look at.
 

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I went with axis. I have shot the FMJ's and was not impressed with durability. They bent on shots where carbon shafts would have just flexed. My axis with double inserts weight 450 grains total. They fly like darts and are tough.


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I’m shooting 29” FMJ’s with 50 gr inserts, 100 gr BH’s and 3-fletch AAE Max Hunters. Total arrow weight is 544 gr. Great performance from this arrow setup. I did find the Axis to be a bit more durable, but the weight and 5mm shaft on the FMJ is a great setup for wind. Also, pulling aluminum arrows from target foam is much easier.
 

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I have shot nothing but FMJ's and Axis the last few years, they are great if you are shooting 20 yards out of a tree stand but not very good for longer distance shooting. FMJ's especially are haeavy shafts and they can be tough to achieve proper FOC with. There are other arrows out there just as good and not as expensive that are excellent.
 

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Oh I forgot about the great Cam Hanes. He can shoot out to 160 yards. Forget everything I said
 

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I have shot nothing but FMJ's and Axis the last few years, they are great if you are shooting 20 yards out of a tree stand but not very good for longer distance shooting. FMJ's especially are haeavy shafts and they can be tough to achieve proper FOC with. There are other arrows out there just as good and not as expensive that are excellent.
I don’t think anyone here has held up FMJ’s as the perfect arrow. Within the AT community the shortcomings of the FMJ are very well known; weight and durability. Though most of the durability claims I hear about seem more anecdotal. For every arrow there are tradeoffs. For me, and the conditions in which I hunt in the western high country, the FMJ’s are what meet my requirements. Whereas you disqualify the FMJ for anything over 20 yds, I prefer a heavier and skinny arrow because of how it performs in the wind, and it’s terminal performance. I can more easily calculate the necessary elevation adjustments of a heavier arrow than predicting the corrections for variable winds at distance. I’ve seen more misses due to wind than I’ve seen due to poor range estimation, especially when using a good range finder. And, in my experience, a 500+ grain arrow performs better on elk. But, I don’t want to turn this into a KE vs momentum debate.

“Proper” FOC on a FMJ is easy to achieve. Either use a 50 gr brass insert, as was already stated by others and my posts in this thread, or use a heavier grain BH. If you’re shooting FMJ’s then this should be fundamental knowledge to you. Again, I’m not arguing the superiority of FMJ’s. I use plenty of other shafts that are not FMJ’s or Easton. Depending on YOUR requirements, YMMV!
 

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I don't believe FOC matters much if at all.

I have shot both Axis and FMJ Deep six. I found the Axis to be not very durable compared to old Gold Tips I used to shoot as well as not as durable as my FMJs. I would go FMJ, the penetration with aluminum is amazing, they hit very hard, are a good GPI. I've bought at least 3 dozen FMJs and see no reason to switch; I haven't found a better arrow.

I don't see why they can't shoot past 20 yards?? Not sure where that comment came from. I run mine out to 80, which isn't too far, but they work awesome. I know a lot of people hate Cam, but he shoots them past 160 extremely well, its hard to argue with that. Maybe they just don't take him seriously because they can't shoot that well themselves.
 

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I've got a dozen brand new, never shot Easton Axis 300's. I can cut them to your specs and fletch with blazers for you. PM me if your interested. I can do well below retail.
 

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Durability is somewhat subjective. While I’ve had fewer FMJ’s break or shatter, they do tend to bend easier than other high-end carbon shafts I’ve used. Since the OP mentioned the Axis, I’ll stick with that comparison. So, if one defines durability as an arrows ability not to shatter, then the FMJ is arguably more durable than the Axis. Again, any evidence of this is anecdotal. I’ve yet to see a scientific experiment where the FMJ is compared to other shafts that are shot into various hard barriers. I will say that from my experience the FMJ tends to bend easier than Axis shafts. I spin my arrows often, especially my practice arrows. The FMJ’s will develop wobbles more often than my Axis shafts. So, if I define a shafts durability in relation to its straightness, then the FMJ is not nearly as durable as the Axis. Again, this is anecdotal evidence as well. I don’t keep notes on my arrows (shot counts, target impact notes, etc.). It could be that I shoot my FMJ’s more often. Maybe I shoot groups with my FMJ’s more often, and they are more susceptible to arrow strikes. Perhaps those that argue the FMJ is more durable never spin test their arrows. Too many variable to draw any solid conlusions.

The reasons I choose the FMJ is because of its weight, 5mm shaft and it’s aluminum properties. If you want to shoot a 540 gr arrow, then the FMJ is one of the best options there is. Both the Axis and the FMJ have the same OD, but the FMJ is marginally straighter than Axis (.002 vs .003). Aluminum has less surface tension than carbon... better penetration. It's for these reasons I hunt with FMJ's.
 
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