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I am new to traditionaland want a new tome recurve. I am looking at either a new samick or a used bear kodiak/kodiak magnum. Is the samick a good bow or should I get a used bear?
 

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Samick makes a heck of a bow. Fit and finish is alot better on they since they paired up with Lancasters. For the price you cant go wrong.
 

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Honestly you are going to have to shoot the bows and find which one fits you the best. The quality may be equal but not the fit. The newer Samick line looks and shoots very well. If you were looking a Bear Kodiak vs the Magnum I would of said the Kodiak. But again it's all in how you percieve the bow when you shoot it. Like many on this forum I've gone through many bows, Black Widow, Howard Hill, Bob Lee, Great Northern, Black Swan, Morrison, Dale Dye, Martin, Bear, and on and on. Thankfully I have found a couple that work real well for me. For instance I love to shoot my Dale Dye recurve, in quality it's right there with my former Black Widow or Bob Lee. Nothing wrong with either of them, just didn't fit my hand, and I didn't feel comfortable at full draw. Would I stay away from recommending them to anyone, no way, they are fantastic bows.
 

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I am looking for info on getting a tradional Bow that works for me. I have a Bear Newer Grizzly and the draw weight is a bit to much. I am at 60 lbs so I am wondering if a Samick at 45 would be a better choice since most places have a limited offering of Traditional Gear like Bows to try and shoot at different draw weights. And buying another one is hard to do on a limited budget. With the Samick being a bit lower in cost I am wondering how do you know what draw weight on a recurve would be the right weight? Plan on using it for hunting mostly and practice for hunting. My draw on a compound is 60 @ 30 inches with a release.

Any suggestions on draw weight and recurve bows (one piece) being the TD get pricey quick. I have always like Bears but again today their are so many makers. Trying to keep the price down if that is possible and get a decent recurve bow. Then it will be on to arrows and the spine.

How do you determine the right draw weight?

Thanks in advance. Hope I am not hijacking this thread.

LFM
 

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I have the Samick T/D hunter @50#.
The quality is very good considering the price (equivalent $160 over here).
It tuned easily, is quiet and smooth to shoot (has small limbsavers and woolen silencers) and I like it.

Kev
 

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Should I even open my mouth?

Look---LFM---and please understand that this is said out of love, not out of an attempt to criticize or ridicule, but if you are new to traditional, asking someone else what the "best" bow is...or for that matter, even what a "good" bow is, is probably not the wisest of ideas. To me, that's the equivalent of asking a woman to marry you...without even having gone out on a first date.

Being new to traditional---or for that matter, even if you have been shooting for years---and asking someone else for their opinion about which is good or not is not going to be anywhere near as good as what most people here will tell you: go out and shoot as many as you can and then find the one that works for you. What someone else likes may be the worst performing piece of garbage in your hands, and what someone else thinks is garbage may be the greatest stick on God's green Earth. And the truth of the matter is: No one is wrong! As crazy as it may sound, when you've found the one that is right for you, trust me---you'll know! And that is a question that no one else can answer for you but you and the bow and how well the two of you interact:wink:

Another thing that has me slightly concerned is that when you say you're new to traditional, I am curious as to how well you've mastered (at least) the basics of shooting a traditional bow. There's not really any sense in getting what you're looking for to be a "keeper" if you haven't gotten enough experience with how different bows perform to know the difference---and have not figured out which would be best for you. In my opinion (and I am sure there are going to be some who will take issue with my saying this, but...), it may be better for you to get something relatively inexpensive, that you can easily draw for medium/longer lengths of time, and learn as much as you can, and in the meanwhile, visit shops and shoots and try out as many bows as you can, but I'd seriously consider putting off getting a hunting bow for the moment. Learn, master form and basics, and practice as much as you can, and then you should know enough about how different bows and types of bows perform that you'll be able to make a wise decision for a "keeper. And on top of that, you'll know how to shoot it as well. Enjoy your journey and God bless!
 

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Okay but I thought asking for info was the point of forums.
Guess I was mistaken...when it comes to learning more about traditional bows and equipment
LFM
 

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Okay but I thought asking for info was the point of forums.
Guess I was mistaken...when it comes to learning more about traditional bows and equipment
LFM
There is absolutely nothing wrong with asking for info here, and quite frankly, I thank God for all the incredible advice, wisdom, and perhaps literal combined millenia of experience that many have so graciously shared over the years I have been a member here, and I try to chime in and help out when and where I can, if it is something I know the answer to. But with that being said, I say again, a person asking someone else for advice on what would be the best bow for them is probably not the wisest of ideas---that is the only area in which anything I've said might be misconstrued as being reluctant to give advice, and even then, it was given as a piece of advice. But I still stand by my assertion that which bow is the "best" bow---or for that matter, even a "good" bow---is not something someone can answer for someone else---only the shooter and the bow can determine that. Beyond that, I am sure you'll find that pretty much everyone here---myself included---is more than happy to share what they know, and that is what makes this place so GREAT! I'm not sure how my previous response came across as a reluctance to give advice, but rest assured, that was not the case
 

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I'm kind of new to traditional archery. (About 6 months) I found a good way
to start off was to do a search for a particular model of bow that I might
want. You can get reviews on some of them as well as lots of good info
in general. I think Samick makes a great bow. Maybe the Red Stag or the
Deer Master t/d recurves might be some good ones to take a look at. The
good thing about the Samick t/d recurves is you can get heavier limbs for
them later on. You could start with 30# or 40# limbs until you get your bow
and shooting form dialed in a bit. Do a search on both of those bows and
see what you come up with. For Samick I like these guys:

http://www.traditionalarcheryusa.com/


Robert
 

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There is absolutely nothing wrong with asking for info here, and quite frankly, I thank God for all the incredible advice, wisdom, and perhaps literal combined millenia of experience that many have so graciously shared over the years I have been a member here, and I try to chime in and help out when and where I can, if it is something I know the answer to. But with that being said, I say again, a person asking someone else for advice on what would be the best bow for them is probably not the wisest of ideas---that is the only area in which anything I've said might be misconstrued as being reluctant to give advice, and even then, it was given as a piece of advice. But I still stand by my assertion that which bow is the "best" bow---or for that matter, even a "good" bow---is not something someone can answer for someone else---only the shooter and the bow can determine that. Beyond that, I am sure you'll find that pretty much everyone here---myself included---is more than happy to share what they know, and that is what makes this place so GREAT! I'm not sure how my previous response came across as a reluctance to give advice, but rest assured, that was not the case
Alanraw:

I am new to traditional as well and I think what LFM is afraid of is that he just doesn't buy a "clunker" bow. I went the inexpensive (CHEAP) route by getting a Samick Sage for $99 at Lancaster. I think the sale ended on the 21st, but it is still only $129.

In hindsight and talking with others, even though I shoot a 70# compound, it looks like I should have gotten a 35 - 40# bow instead of a 45# bow that I could use for hunting.

That being said, and having limited funds as well, for $99 I should be able to figure out whether or not I am going to like switching from a compound to a recurve. I just wanted to make sure that the Samick Sage wasn't a "clunker" so advice gotten from this forum was helpful.

Unfortunately, there are no places around here where I could go out and shoot a bunch of different bows.

You were right on in saying that until you shoot a bow, you'll never know how it fits you. But, I think for myself, not wasting money on an expensive bow right away that I may not like, was my main goal.

t
 
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