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Discussion Starter #1
My wife is brand new to archery and is starting out shooting the Hoyt Klasher with a 25" draw length and a 30lb draw weight.

She is really enjoying shooting but wants to be able to pull more weight and have the arrow travel flatter through the air. End goal is to be able to hunt later this year.

I would think that once she can pull back and shoot 30 arrows in a row that we could go ahead and add an additional 5 lbs draw weight.

Any thoughts or recommendations on when to increase the draw weight?
 

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Why not get her some really light arrows? What arrow/weight/spine is she shooting now? Easton Apollo are $80/dozen and Easton Inspire are $40/dozen. Build them with 2" feathers with a .900 spine cut 25" at 30 pounds, no need to turn the bow up, they will fly flat.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The archery shop we bought the bow at suggested we use the Gold Tip Hunter 500. They came with blazer vanes equipped.

Do you think going with a lighter arrow would still be suitable for deer hunting? My only concern is that they are going to strike with enough force to get a clean kill.
 

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Being able to control the bow is more important than draw weight, Shop probably doesn't carry 900 spine arrows so he sells what he has in stock.
Friend brings his daughter & she is shooting about 32# & the shop gives her 500's at 27" & her DL is only 25". Most shops will sell what ever have on hand. She will struggle when trying to push the weight up & will probably loose interest then.
She just needs to take close shots & be accurate. WI. is 30# check & see what your state regs. is.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I definitely don't want her to lose interest so I don't plan to make any changes soon.

It would be interesting to see what the speed is at 30# draw weight.

Probably limiting shots to no more than 20 yards would be good to start with in the woods.
 

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A 5 pound increase can be too much at once for a girl. Maybe she can do it, maybe not. As a new shooter, hopefully her muscles adapt quickly. I increased 5 pounds this year by turning it up a quarter turn at a time over the course of 5 months. If I found it was too much I would turn it back for awhile until it was easier.

I would not recommend light arrows for hunting with a low poundage short draw.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks. I agree about not shooting light arrows for hunting purposes.

I am hopeful that since she is new to the sport and shooting every other day that by November I can add another couple of pounds. We are working on some upper body strength building exercises so I hope this in combination with shooting often will allow her to build up enough strength to hit 40 lbs by the end of the year.

We will see... Either way we will play it safe and make sure to keep it enjoyable.
 

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If she shoots every other night for a month, by the end of the month she should have enough muscle memory to up her draw weight.
I shot my first whitetail at 38lbs, it can be done. I would try to up her weight sooner rather than later so you're not changing things up right before season starts.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If she shoots every other night for a month, by the end of the month she should have enough muscle memory to up her draw weight.
I shot my first whitetail at 38lbs, it can be done. I would try to up her weight sooner rather than later so you're not changing things up right before season starts.
Season has already started here in Georgia but it is too blazing hot to get out there right now anyways. Once her accuracy is better (just needs more time and muscle memory) I will bump it up one half turn at a time. I imagine she will increase strength quickly considering she has never used these muscles before.
 

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My wife is brand new to archery and is starting out shooting the Hoyt Klasher with a 25" draw length and a 30lb draw weight.

She is really enjoying shooting but wants to be able to pull more weight and have the arrow travel flatter through the air. End goal is to be able to hunt later this year.

I would think that once she can pull back and shoot 30 arrows in a row that we could go ahead and add an additional 5 lbs draw weight.

Any thoughts or recommendations on when to increase the draw weight?
Wow, this thread exploded....I think the answer here is quite simple, how about WHEN SHE WANTS TO?

I do not think there is any such thing as a 5# increase being "too much for a girl" any more than it would be for a guy. That said, 5# is a sizeable adjustment. The only caveat I see here is that she is a NEW SHOOTER. So, first and foremost is FORM. If she wants to keep turning it up, go up to where it is not "too easy" (she can determine) and then have her shoot. If she can't do a normal practice session it's too much; if she can, her muscles will adapt. Then adjust more gradually; maybe 1 or 1/2 turn at a time. If it gets hard to pull back the adjustment needs to be smaller. Archery muscles can develop quickly. Someone starting out at 30# could very well work their way up to over 50# or 60# maybe even more if they really wanted to. I see no reason not to, as long as it FEELS RIGHT TO HER.

What I would do is NOT buy new arrows though right now. What you can do is have her shoot whatever she has, work on form and just shooting a lot. As her progressions start to taper off in the draw weight then you can get tuning and arrow setup all dialed in. That said, the GT 500's will likely be fine til she is shooting over 50# (you may have to cut them at some point before then, it depends).

FWIW, for low poundage I don't think you need to go overkill on the arrow weight. There's a balance to be struck, and a well placed arrow with a sharp broadhead kills every time, especially on them little southern deer ;) Just make sure to teach her the limitations of her setup and how that applies to shot selection. Shots you could take without thinking twice may not be a good idea for her. Depends where she ends up. Also, choose your broadhead wisely.
 

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Amyers0802
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Techniques leading up to the shot are just as important as the shot. This includes drawing back, nonetheless, drawing back is just one component of the entire package. Specifics include foot placement, standing sitting, movement, string to release, variations of draw and controlling pre-shot anxiety while the deer moves in position. Also prepping your stand area if shooting from a tree stand (marking the circle of death). This list goes on and on.

Bottom line I would stick to a draw weight that is comfortable for her and legal for shooting. I would then practice practice practice and change situations to shoot from and practice environmental shooting adaptability. Nothing can prepare you for the first time a deer gets under 20 yards and your heart is racing.

Good luck and happy hunting,

A
MatthewsZ7ext
 

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When I started shooting, I was at 35#. I shot every day, often 75-100 arrows. There wasn’t anyone around to tell me not to, and I could handle that number of arrows. Within 3 weeks I had the bow maxed at 45#, and could shoot it comfortably sitting down. Everyone is different. If your wife can sit an draw the bow, hold at draw, and then let down with no issue, try putting a turn in the top and bottom limb bolt. Don’t focus on the number- focus on her maintaining control and developing strength where she needs it. Shoot a couple of days, see how her stamina holds, and increase as she is comfortable. 30 arrows in a session, every other day, isn’t a lot, when you consider that in a hunting situation she may be cold, stiff, and nervous. That one shot she has to make under pressure, cold, is going to be a lot harder than 30 shots taken in a relaxed setting. I would deal with one thing at a time. Build her strength up, work on form, and build her confidence.
 

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After watching her shoot for the past couple of weeks she has definitely become more comfortable with pulling the weight. For now I won't suggest for her to move it up until her form is correct in other areas.

Now the biggest issue seems to be holding steady on the target which will correct itself over time. Her group for the first 6 arrows at 15 yards is about 8 inches wide. The next 6 widens out more and continues to widen as her arms get more tired. But this is also getting better when compared to day one. Everybody faces this same issue when getting fatigued.

She is also needing to lean back a little bit to feel comfortable shooting which I don't think is an issue for target practice and don't plan on adjusting until she can hold the bow on target more steadily. We will eventually work on shooting from different positions once she is able to hold tight groups on the target.

Consistent grip, and jerking the trigger is another thing we will tackle down the road.

Right now I am just happy she looks forward to shooting and hope I can keep her encouraged to stick with it.
 

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After watching her shoot for the past couple of weeks she has definitely become more comfortable with pulling the weight. For now I won't suggest for her to move it up until her form is correct in other areas.

Now the biggest issue seems to be holding steady on the target which will correct itself over time. Her group for the first 6 arrows at 15 yards is about 8 inches wide. The next 6 widens out more and continues to widen as her arms get more tired. But this is also getting better when compared to day one. Everybody faces this same issue when getting fatigued.

She is also needing to lean back a little bit to feel comfortable shooting which I don't think is an issue for target practice and don't plan on adjusting until she can hold the bow on target more steadily. We will eventually work on shooting from different positions once she is able to hold tight groups on the target.

Consistent grip, and jerking the trigger is another thing we will tackle down the road.

Right now I am just happy she looks forward to shooting and hope I can keep her encouraged to stick with it.
That's fantastic that she is enjoying the sport and practicing shooting!

One thing I did not see you mention, that was probably the single-biggest thing for me, when I was starting shooting, that took me from the level of the groups you describe, to being able to stack most of the arrows inside the 5-ring at 20; was anchor point. This can be a little complex with a newer shooter; as it's hard enough to really "nail it" on draw length to begin with. (Which also makes it hard to place the peep in the right place).

If she is having to lean back to feel comfortable shooting, I think her DL is either too short or too long. Either condition can cause one to lean back.
Pay attention to her head position when she is shooting. If she has to tilt her head forward into the string to look through the peep, it is likely too short; if she has to tilt away from it, or is unable to pull the string to her nose, it is likely too long.

Mention this stuff, because DL is the foundation of being able to hold stable; and anchor point, is the foundation for being able to be consistent.

Yep, lots of stuff to work on!

What I would suggest is posting a picture of her form in here, and maybe in Gen Arch as well. Take a few shots, from in front of, behind her, and if you can, from above. People here will be able to give much better feed back that way!
 

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My wife started out with her bow in the low 30 pound range. She is naturally right handed, but left eye dominant so she also started out shooting a left-handed bow.

Just had her shoot as much as she was comfortable with couple days a week at least. Every week or so I would turn the bolts up a half a turn. We never checked the wait until right before hunting season, as to leave the number out of the equation. Just keep it on form and personal Comfort and determination. Within a few months she was up to 43 pounds for hunting season. By the next season (this year) she was up to 52 pounds.

Just remember to focus on form. there for a little bit she was pushing herself hard and got to the point to where she realized she could not pull her bow back with her Bino harness on, she was starting to pull too much into her chest.

Like mentioned before. I think when it comes down to it the most important thing for her is The combination of her comfort level and knowing her limitations. Just remember to be ethical. Don’t shoot a super light set up just to increase her distance if the accuracy isn’t there, especially with broadheads. Also if that arrow isn’t going to have enough kinetic energy for lethal penetration. Nothing more gut wrenching and demoralizing than just wounding an animal. That can crush somebody’s spirit and enthusiasm pretty quickly!
 

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After watching her shoot for the past couple of weeks she has definitely become more comfortable with pulling the weight. For now I won't suggest for her to move it up until her form is correct in other areas.

Now the biggest issue seems to be holding steady on the target which will correct itself over time. Her group for the first 6 arrows at 15 yards is about 8 inches wide. The next 6 widens out more and continues to widen as her arms get more tired. But this is also getting better when compared to day one. Everybody faces this same issue when getting fatigued.

She is also needing to lean back a little bit to feel comfortable shooting which I don't think is an issue for target practice and don't plan on adjusting until she can hold the bow on target more steadily. We will eventually work on shooting from different positions once she is able to hold tight groups on the target.

Consistent grip, and jerking the trigger is another thing we will tackle down the road.

Right now I am just happy she looks forward to shooting and hope I can keep her encouraged to stick with it.
Good idea... don’t push too hard. Takes time, it’ll come.
 

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It depends on the bow, but at least a 1/2 or full turn as soon as you get comfortable with the poundage. Do not over do it, that could potentially lead to shoulders getting hurt and out of place. I had to sit out for 2 weeks, because I shot so much when I first upped my poundage. It was awful.
 
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