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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in my early forties and have never been hunting. I just purchased a Mission Riot and have been practicing. My son who is nine is excited and can't wait to start hunting. I would love to teach him, but being a novice myself, I am trying to figure out how to get started. I have taken my hunter's safety course and will purchase my license. I am just interested in advice on how to get started. I live in Northwestern OH. Should I join a club and hope some one will show me the ropes? Or do I just take my chances on some public land and just see how it goes? Does the state offer hunts for people new to the sport? Any suggestions would be helpful.
 

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I would hit up your local pro shop. Shoot the range there with the other archers there. They will be able to help you first hand. That being said DO NOT HESITATE TO ASK ANY QUESTIONS ON THIS FORUM! There are a lot of guys out here that can help you out and are great guys. If you question anything the guys at the shop tell you, post it up here and guys on here will be able to tell you if it crap or good advise.

Oh almost forgot, welcome to the the site.
 

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My advice;

Don't buy a bunch of stuff. You'll never get what you need if you don't know what you need. Clothes that don't make noise, a small knife for skinning, a camera, bow and arrow and a sense of humor is all you really need.
Shoot the first deer you see. If it's your first, you need to get that under your belt ASAP. It cannot be explained what happens to you after you shoot your first. You just have to do it. It's like sex.
Master your bow. Before you think about shooting a deer, be sure you can hit it where you want. You owe the critter that much. I'm not talking about hitting bottle caps at 70yds, I'm talking baseballs at 30yds.
Don't watch hunting shows. You will not learn anything useful from those. They are just commercials for stuff you don't need. Learning woodcraft is a doing thing. There are several books that will help, maybe somebody could chime in on those.
Hunting isn't shooting. You may go years and not get a chance at a deer. Enjoy the time outdoors and being part of nature.
Follow the basics and you'll be ok. Remember, nobody climbs mountains for the view, you do it for the challenge.

I wish you and your son the best of luck and welcome to Archery Talk.
 

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Welcome to the sport!
I couldn’t tell you the first thing about hunters in NW Ohio, but most hunters (clubs or public land) cherish their favorite spots and won’t divulge too many secrets. As far as learning the basics (scouting, stand placement, when and where to hunt) it always helps to have a selfless friend show you the ropes.
I can tell you that my favorite set up for bow hunting has always been to target bottlenecks between feeding and bedding areas. I find that it is easiest to pattern deer during bow season in these “transition” areas. So I would start with aerial photos of public land and look for possible bottlenecks that will naturally funnel the deer. Once you think you have located a few put in the footwork.
Best of luck! And always ask questions.
 

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Welcome to bowhunting and to AT. A good buck to help you with the lingo and learning a little about how to hunt deer would be Mapping Trophy Bucks by Brad Herndon. This will give you an idea of how to get started learning where deer will be. Practice under hunting conditions. Shoot from stands, ground blinds, sitting, standing, and kneeling. Shoot one shot cold, which means no warm up, and make that shot count. When your cold shot is on target consistently that should be your hunting distance.
 

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Keep up the research!! with some beginners luck (which for some reason they always see deer and get lucky with a giant ha!!) and planning you will be on your way.. Like said above dont be afraid to ask any Q's on here. I am fairly new to the site and have already seen tons of grateful advice being poured out to people. Good luck and i hope your ready to get addicted really fast, it willl happen ha!!
 

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My advice;

Don't buy a bunch of stuff. You'll never get what you need if you don't know what you need. Clothes that don't make noise, a small knife for skinning, a camera, bow and arrow and a sense of humor is all you really need.
Shoot the first deer you see. If it's your first, you need to get that under your belt ASAP. It cannot be explained what happens to you after you shoot your first. You just have to do it. It's like sex.
Master your bow. Before you think about shooting a deer, be sure you can hit it where you want. You owe the critter that much. I'm not talking about hitting bottle caps at 70yds, I'm talking baseballs at 30yds.
Don't watch hunting shows. You will not learn anything useful from those. They are just commercials for stuff you don't need. Learning woodcraft is a doing thing. There are several books that will help, maybe somebody could chime in on those.
Hunting isn't shooting. You may go years and not get a chance at a deer. Enjoy the time outdoors and being part of nature.
Follow the basics and you'll be ok. Remember, nobody climbs mountains for the view, you do it for the challenge.

I wish you and your son the best of luck and welcome to Archery Talk.
That's some pretty solid advice right there. I'll add this, I don't care what you do a deer is going to smell you if there close enough. Always try to have the wind in your favor. Have different places to hunt for different wind directions.
 

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My advice;

Don't buy a bunch of stuff. You'll never get what you need if you don't know what you need. Clothes that don't make noise, a small knife for skinning, a camera, bow and arrow and a sense of humor is all you really need.
Shoot the first deer you see. If it's your first, you need to get that under your belt ASAP. It cannot be explained what happens to you after you shoot your first. You just have to do it. It's like sex.
Master your bow. Before you think about shooting a deer, be sure you can hit it where you want. You owe the critter that much. I'm not talking about hitting bottle caps at 70yds, I'm talking baseballs at 30yds.
Don't watch hunting shows. You will not learn anything useful from those. They are just commercials for stuff you don't need. Learning woodcraft is a doing thing. There are several books that will help, maybe somebody could chime in on those.
Hunting isn't shooting. You may go years and not get a chance at a deer. Enjoy the time outdoors and being part of nature.
Follow the basics and you'll be ok. Remember, nobody climbs mountains for the view, you do it for the challenge.

I wish you and your son the best of luck and welcome to Archery Talk.
This is great advice.

Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk 2
 

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I wouldn't buy a bunch of gadgets however the one thing I feel is important if you are not good at judging distance is a rangefinder. I know I sure wish I had one 24 years ago when I started.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you very much for the advice. I will look for that book. I will not shoot an animal until I am comfortable with my accuracy. I am not interested in wounding a deer, now killing and eating is another matter. A guy at the archery shop told me not to take a deer over 20 yards until I get a few under my belt. As far as gadgets, I keep remembering what my father told me about fishing lures. He said the best fishing lures were designed to catch the fisherman. I can already see that this is true about archery. I bought Mission Riot with the hunter package that includes: QAD Ultra-Rest Hunter, Alpine Bear Claw Quiver, TruGlo Carbon XS 4 Pin Sight, and Axion 3" Stabilizer. I have it set at 27" draw at 55lbs. I bought this bow with my son in mind. I figure if I get hooked and he starts shooting, then I can pass it on to him. I am very good at rationalizing my purchases. I did buy a Tru-Fire Edge 4 Finger Release. I felt more comfortable with a hand held release than a wrist strap release. I really appreciate every ones help here. I have already marked AT on my favorites.
 

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My advice;

Don't buy a bunch of stuff. You'll never get what you need if you don't know what you need. Clothes that don't make noise, a small knife for skinning, a camera, bow and arrow and a sense of humor is all you really need.
Shoot the first deer you see. If it's your first, you need to get that under your belt ASAP. It cannot be explained what happens to you after you shoot your first. You just have to do it. It's like sex.
Master your bow. Before you think about shooting a deer, be sure you can hit it where you want. You owe the critter that much. I'm not talking about hitting bottle caps at 70yds, I'm talking baseballs at 30yds.
Don't watch hunting shows. You will not learn anything useful from those. They are just commercials for stuff you don't need. Learning woodcraft is a doing thing. There are several books that will help, maybe somebody could chime in on those.
Hunting isn't shooting. You may go years and not get a chance at a deer. Enjoy the time outdoors and being part of nature.
Follow the basics and you'll be ok. Remember, nobody climbs mountains for the view, you do it for the challenge.

I wish you and your son the best of luck and welcome to Archery Talk.

This ^^^^^
Welcome to the addiction, its a great way to spend time with your son. I've been shooting with my son since he was 6, he is 13 now, and still sends me pictures of his groups while I'm at work. He is still after his first deer, he killed a hog with his bow 2 years ago.
 

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You sir are on the right track! Time in the woods will be your best teacher! Play the wind and be a predator. Quite, move slow, and practice a ton with your bow. If you are fortunate enough to harvest a animal, I would bring him to the butcher and ask him if he will teach you how to gut and butcher the deer for you. If you lived closer i would have you and your son on my land in a heartbeat!!

Welcome to AT and good luck this year! Be safe!
 

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Some great advice has been posted here so far. When I started bow hunting, I didn't have a portable tree stand, just one ladder stand. After many encounters with deer and always getting busted being on the ground, I decided to buy a good climber. I rarely hunt out of anything other than my climber now and have killed numerous deer from it. IMO, it is very important to be able to hunt from an elevated position, because of scent and to get out of the deer's line of sight to enable you to draw without being detected.

Good luck and welcome to AT.
 

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lots of great info here
also on the net in general try a search hunting tactics for beginners feel free to pm me if you have any questions, also when you are beginning dont get discouraged it's an art and takes some learning and practice..

welcome to the adiction
 

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Have you hunted at all before? If not there are a lot of basics you will learn and probably a lot of them the hard way. Tips and tactics that seem elementary to folks that have been doing this a long time will be all new to you if you've never hunted. You can't kill a deer sitting on the couch so plan on spending time in the woods, the more the merrier. You will see, smell, & hear things you've never imagined. If you've never hunted then the simplest advice I can give to put you on deer is find the food. Look for chunks of bedding that serve as cover and find the trails where deer move from cover to food and food to cover. Set up downwind of those trails (especially look for inside corners where 2 patches of cover meet a field edge) and settle in. The closer you get to mid-November the more action you're likely to see. Be safe, hunt smart, and enjoy every second of it. Take lots and lots of pictures. You can find books about fundamental tactics and strategies in almost any sporting goods store.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Wow, Thank You all for taking the time to answer my post. What a great community. I have never hunted before, though I used to go with my Dad bird hunting when I was a little boy. I spend as much time in the woods with my sons as I can, fishing, hiking and camping. Now I will have an excuse to spend even more time outdoors. I am going to take some free classes at Bass Pro this weekend on hunting and field dressing. I will keep you updated on how it goes.
 

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Take in all the info you possibly can. Don't buy a bunch of gear. I've accumulated my stuff over 4 tears.
 

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Don't hesitate to hunt! Who cares if you get one or not, you'll learn something ever time you go out.
Even if you don't see anything, think about why that was?
No sign, no food source, no bedding/cover areas. And if you get lucky.....shot the first deer you see!
You will never learn everything...been at it 40 years and every year seems something new and different.
The important thing is your out in the woods with your kids.
Enjoy it. Seems it was yesterday my kid was tagging along..now he's off to college this fall!
 

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I think getting yourself and your kids involved in hunting is one of the best things you could ever do. I know it kept me out of trouble....taught me patience....respect....so many things I cant even list them all. Some of the best times of my life were and still are spent in the woods with good friends and family...incredible... unpredictable.... good times I will cherish forever.
 
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